soldier

  In his book, Men of War: The American Soldier in Combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima, Alexander Rose draws on an immense range of firsthand sources from the battlefield. He begins by re-creating the lost and alien world of eighteenth-century warfare at Bunker Hill, the bloodiest clash of the War of Independence, and reveals why the American militiamen were so lethally effective against the oncoming waves of British troops.

Then, focusing on Gettysburg, Rose describes a typical Civil War infantry action, vividly explaining what Union and Confederate soldiers experienced before, during, and after combat. Finally, he shows how in 1945 the Marine Corps hurled itself with the greatest possible violence at the island of Iwo Jima, where nearly a third of all Marines killed in World War II would die. As Rose demonstrates, the most important factor in any battle is the human one: At Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima, the American soldier, as much as any general, proved decisive.

  In Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War, Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little known aspects of the Civil War - the stories of four courageous women - a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow - who were spies.

"Bring the War Home," which had been a rallying cry of the anti-Vietnam-War movement, was transformed on May 4, 1970 into a macabre irony when the Ohio National Guard opened fire on student anti-war protesters at Kent State, killing four and wounding nine. Many, certainly not all, of the anti-war student activists were chauvinist, privileged, white men.

    In the winter of 1939 in the cold snow of no-man’s-land, two loners met and began an extraordinary journey that would turn them into lifelong friends. One was an orphaned puppy, abandoned by his owners as they fled Nazi forces. The other was a different kind of lost soul—a Czech airman bound for the Royal Air Force and the country that he would come to call home.

    In the late summer of 1918, after four long years of senseless, stagnant fighting, the Western Front erupted. The bitter four-month struggle that ensued—known as the Hundred Days Campaign—saw some of the bloodiest and most ferocious combat of the Great War, as the Allies grimly worked to break the stalemate in the west and end the conflict that had decimated Europe.

A U.S. Army soldier from the Berkshire County town of Dalton was among three killed Tuesday in an attack in Afghanistan.

According to military officials 24-year old Army Spc. Mitchell Kirk Daehling was killed along with fellow soldiers Spc. William Joseph Gilbert and Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey C. Baker. The soldiers were killed by an improvised explosive device.

Daehling was a 2006 graduate of Wahconah Regional High School. On the school’s website a statement reads in part, “Mitch was a true "Warrior" in every sense of the word.” The school’s mascot is the Warrior.

The 2005 publication of Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles changed author and former sniper Anthony Swofford’s life. The Gulf War memoir became a best-seller and inspired a film adaptation starring Jake Gyllenhaal.