For anyone who has ever been more comfortable in the press box than on the sideline, Mitch Sloan is a familiar kid in Rookie Bookie, the new young adult book co-authored by our guest Jon Wertheim. An undersized and sometimes overshadowed thinker, Sloan always looks for the angle as he builds a middle school gambling business using ideas familiar from Wertheim’s landmark exploration of sports and behavioral economics, Scorecasting.


  Three-time National Champion, two-time Olympian and NBCSports commentator Johnny Weir was in Albany last weekend for a meet and greet with skaters and fans at the Empire State Plaza. WAMC's Jessica Bloustein Marshall caught up with him while he was there.

Even though she's not yet 25, in some ways, Nastia Liukin has already led several lives — and has done so on the world stage.

    In 1969, the 42-year history of biennial golf matches between the United States and Great Britain reached its climax. The U.S., led by Jack Nicklaus, had dominated competitive golf for years; Great Britain, led by Tony Jacklin, was the undisputed underdog. But in spite of having lost 14 of 17 Ryder Cups in the past, the British entered the 1969 Ryder Cup as determined as the Americans were dominant. What followed was the most compelling, controversial, and contentious Ryder Cup the sport had ever seen.

Author, writer and blogger, Neil Sagebiel writes about it in his new book, Draw in the Dunes: The 1969 Ryder Cup and the Finish That Shocked the World.

Keith Strudler: Ray Rice, Domestic Violence And The NFL

Sep 10, 2014

It’s a safe default to assume you’re always being watched. The notion of privacy is as antiquated as afternoon tea time and top hats. Particularly if you’re somebody, you live your life as if it’s on TV.

Yankee Stadium
Ian Pickus, WAMC

After a cast of Yankee greats and Hall of Famers had taken their seats, after none other than Michael Jordan electrified the Yankee Stadium crowd, after the raucous cheers finally died down, a visibly touched Derek Jeter gave a brief speech. A line in the valedictory said everything.

  John Feinstein has been praised as “the best writer of sports books in America today” (The Boston Globe). The Walk On is the first installment in his Triple Threat series is his most thrilling and suspenseful novel yet. He joins us to talk about the series and about current events in the world of sports.


   In Against Football, Steve Almond details why, after forty years as a fan, he can no longer watch the game he still loves.

Major League Baseball is the toughest level of the sport, with the world’s best players and highest quality of play. But contrary to what modern fans used to on-demand scores and video might think, it wasn’t always this way.

    The fights resonate still: The Fight of the Century, Down Goes Frazier!, The Rumble in the Jungle, The Thrilla in Manila. And the fighters, too, Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, and George foreman - three complicated and competitive men who happened to be vying for sport's biggest prize when boxing was still a national reassurance and its champion a cultural resource. They fought five times for that title, from 1971 to 1975, ranging across the globe, and their struggles, triumphs, and defeats echo through the years as well.

In Bouts of Mania: Ali, Frazier, and Foreman - and an America on the Ropes, longtime Sports Illustrated writer Richard Hoffer evokes all the hopes and hoopla, the hype and hysteria of boxing's last and best "golden age."