spy

  In June of 2013, Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old former CIA employee, thrust himself into the spotlight when he leaked thousands of top secret National Security Agency (NSA) documents to the journalist, Glen Greenwald. Immediately branded as a whistleblower, Snowden reignited an international debate about private citizens who reveal government secrets that should be exposed but may endanger the lives of citizens.

Like the late Karen Silkwood, whose death in a car accident while bringing incriminating evidence against her employer to a meeting with a New York Times reporter, is still a mystery, Snowden was intent upon revealing the controversial practices of his employer, a government contractor.

Rightly or wrongly, Snowden and Silkwood believed that their revelations would save lives. In his book, The Whistleblower's Dilemma: Snowden, Silkwood And Their Quest For the Truth, Richard Rashke weaves between the lives of these two controversial figures and creates a narrative context for a discussion of what constitutes a citizen’s duty to reveal or not to reveal.

  In Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War, Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little known aspects of the Civil War - the stories of four courageous women - a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow - who were spies.

  In The Red Room - the newest international thrill ride from New York Times-bestselling author Ridley Pearson - John Knox and Grace Chu, the incomparable and often incompatible duo, team up again, this time in the exotic “city between two worlds,” Istanbul.

1/7/14 Panel

Jan 7, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and Newsman, Ray Graf. Meteorologist, Paul Caiano, will join us for part of the show to talk about the record breaking cold weather.

Topics include:
Utah - Supreme Court
Cheney Out of Race
Yellen In
Polar Vortex
Biden in Albany
Burglary Exposed J. Edgar Hoover's FBI

    Gordon Corera is a security correspondent for BBC News. In that role, he covers the work of Britain's intelligence agencies. His new book is The Art of Betrayal: The Secret History of MI6: Life and Death in the British Secret Service - in it, he provides a unique and unprecedented insight into this secret world and the reality that lies behind the fiction.

Peter Steiner is a writer, artist and former New Yorker cartoonist. While he may be best known for his 1993 New Yorker cartoon, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog,” Peter Steiner has recently been making a name for himself as a writer of powerful thrillers. His most recent novel is The Resistance: A Thriller (Louis Morgon Thriller).