Stephen Lynch

Mass. Voters To Decide US Senate Primary Winners

Apr 30, 2013

Massachusetts voters are heading to the polls to decide which Republican and Democratic candidates will win their party primaries and go on to run in the state's second special U.S. Senate election in four years.

The race to fill the seat formerly held by Secretary of State John Kerry has been overshadowed by the Boston Marathon bombings. A light turnout is expected today.

The Republican candidates include former Navy SEAL Gabriel Gomez, former U.S. Attorney Michael Sullivan and state Rep. Daniel Winslow.

masonvotes Flickr

It appears that interest for Massachusetts’ U.S. Senate primary election tomorrow is low, particularly for cities and towns in the westernmost part of the commonwealth.

wikipedia commons

Democratic Massachusetts Senate candidate Stephen Lynch has canceled most public events on the eve of the primary election because he is ill.

U.S. Rep. Lynch's campaign says all public events have been canceled Monday except for a scheduled rally at the Iron Workers Hall in South Boston at 7 p.m.

Lynch is facing off against fellow U.S. Rep. Edward Markey in the Democratic primary on Tuesday.

State Rep. Daniel Winslow, businessman Gabriel Gomez and former U.S. attorney Michael Sullivan are squaring off in the Republican primary.

The Springfield Republican ( debate pool photograph)

With just a week remaining before the primaries in the special election for U.S. Senate in Massachusetts the two Democratic candidates held a debate in Springfield last night that was punctuated with heated rhetoric. 

The two veteran U.S. Representatives, Stephen Lynch and Edward Markey, argued bitterly over their Congressional voting records on issues ranging from homeland security to health care to the bailout of the automobile industry. Markey accused Lynch of personal attacks and deliberate distortions, while Lynch at one point called Markey a “liar.”

3 GOP US Senate hopefuls squaring off in debate

Apr 10, 2013
Jason Wilson/Flickr

The three Republican candidates for U.S. Senate are preparing to square off in a televised debate.

Michael Sullivan, Gabriel Gomez and Daniel Winslow are expected to participate in the debate sponsored by WBZ-TV and the Boston Globe. The debate is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m.

The three are competing in the April 30 primary.

Whoever attracts the most votes will face the winner of the Democratic primary pitting Congressmen Edward Markey and Stephen Lynch against each other.

  The Massachusetts Senate race primary is just weeks away.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Stephen Lynch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he hopes to be successful in his race against fellow Congressman Ed Markey.

Polls show Democratic  Congressman Ed Markey is the frontrunner in the special election for US Senate in Massachusetts.   His primary opponent, Congressman Stephen Lynch is trying to shore up support among key Democratic constituencies. 

   The dean of the Massachusetts delegation, Ed Markey has a huge lead of 29 points over his Democratic primary opponent, fellow Congressman Stephen Lynch, in a poll released this week by the Boston Herald and  UMass Lowell. Markey leads Lynch, 50 percent to 21 percent among likely primary voters.

WAMC

For a time it appeared Republicans would struggle to field a candidate for the special election for U.S. Senate in Massachusetts.  But when the deadline passed earlier this week for candidates to submit 10,000 signatures it turned out that three people will compete for the party’s nomination.

WAMC

Gabriel Gomez,one of the three Republicans running in the special U.S. Senate election in Massachusetts, formally launched his campaign on Thursday with events across the state.

Speaking at an American Legion Hall in West Springfield, Gomez introduced himself as a fresh faced political outsider with an appealing life story. He’s the son of Columbian immigrants, a former Navy SEAL and a successful businessman.  He said reducing government spending, and creating  jobs are top priorities

GOP, Dems in final signature gathering sprint

Feb 25, 2013
masonvotes Flickr

Democrats and Republicans hoping to get their names on the ballot for the special U.S. Senate election face a signature-gathering sprint before the close of business Wednesday.

That's the deadline for collecting the 10,000 voter signatures necessary to secure a spot on the April 30 primary ballot.

Candidates typically try to collect more than 10,000 signatures to give themselves a cushion in case not all are certified.

WAMC

The Massachusetts Republican Party remains optimistic about the upcoming special election to fill the senate seat formerly held by Secretary of State John Kerry.  But it appears the minority party in the Bay State is facing long odds. 

   Republicans are facing a number of challenges in their quest to pick off a Democratic seat in the U.S. Senate from Massachusetts.  The immediate challenge for the party is getting a candidate willing to commit to the race, according to Tim Vercellotti, a political science professor at Western New England University.

WAMC

There will be no senate comeback bid this year for Scott Brown. The former Republican senator announced Friday he will not run in the special election to fill the vacancy left by  John Kerry’s departure.

Brown  who became a national Republican star with his upset victory in the 2010 special election for senate in Massachusetts, then lost to Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren last year, has decided to sit out this year’s senate campaign.

official photo

The race for US Senate in Massachusetts  is heating up. Congressman Stephen Lynch has launched a campaign for the Democratic nomination. Lynch and fellow Democratic Congressman Ed Markey are the only announced candidates, so far. WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill spoke with Lynch in Springfield about why he’s running for senate.

WAMC

Massachusetts Congressman Stephen Lynch has  launched his campaign for the US Senate in Massachusetts becoming the second Democrat in the race.

Lynch, who grew up in a housing project in Boston and was an ironworker before going into politics said he would be the voice of  working families in the Senate.  He took a dig at the Democratic Party establishment for trying to clear the field for fellow Congressman Ed Markey, saying he would try to earn the election, not buy it.

Fickr/Diane Beckwith-Zink and Wikimedia Commons

BOSTON (AP) — GOP officials close to Scott Brown report that the former Republican senator is "leaning strongly toward running" in the special election to replace Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry.

They report that Brown is likely to enter the race early next week. The officials spoke Tuesday on the condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to share internal discussions.