In his new book Creative Schools, Sir Ken Robinson offers a roadmap to parents, educators and administrators on how to transform the way our schools work, highlighting schools around the world that have already begun this process and giving practical examples of what works.

One of the schools Robinson profiles is Smokie Road Middle School in Newnan, Georgia, which had the odds stacked against it with consistently low academic achievement ratings and a high poverty level. When a new principal arrived and focused on the everyday needs of each individual student and strove to meet those needs by prioritizing what the student found to be important - she had dramatic results and saw improvement on every level.

  Sir Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential educators. Listed by Fast Company as “one of the world’s elite thinkers on creativity and innovation,” he advises governments, corporations, and leading cultural institutions.

In his new book, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education, he shows parents, educators and administrators how they can transform the way our schools work. He says - by focusing first on the students and teachers (not test scores), schools can evolve into the organic, personal learning environments they deserve to be.

As the legislative session winds down in New York, there's an eleventh hour push to promote a measure that would prevent and protect health professionals from participating in torture - WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas spoke this morning with Dr. Allen Keller, Director of the Bellevue/NYU Program for Survivors of Torture, who is in Albany today in support of the bill.

    We speak with Dave Tomar about his book, The Shadow Scholar: How I Made a Living Helping College Kids Cheat.


Thirteen students from six Vermont colleges and universities are spending their summer working on long-term recovery projects from storm Irene.

The group in charge is the Vermont Campus Compact's Statewide Internships for Vermont Recovery. The program is starting today.

The undergraduate and graduate students will take on a variety of projects that range from working with flood survivors to improving emergency response plans. They will take part in the continuing cleanup effort and assess environmental damage following the storm last August.