success

Rachel Simmons is the author of "Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives," and the New York Times bestsellers "Odd Girl Out and "The Curse of the Good Girl."

As an educator, Rachel teaches girls and women skills to build their resilience, amplify their voices, and own their courage so that they live with integrity and health.

"Down the Up Staircase" tells the story of one Harlem family across three generations, connecting its journey to the historical and social forces that transformed Harlem over the past century.

Bruce D. Haynes and Syma Solovitch capture the tides of change that pushed blacks forward through the twentieth century as well as the many forces that ravaged black communities, including Haynes's own.

As an authority on race and urban communities, Haynes brings unique sociological insights to the American mobility saga and the tenuous nature of status and success among the black middle class. Bruce Haynes joins us.

The small village of Norwich, Vermont, has an unusual knack for creating Olympians. Despite only having about three thousand residents, they have sent an athlete to nearly every Winter Olympics in the past thirty years, and three times the athlete has returned with a medal.

But according to our next guest, this unusually high success rate is not the result of tiger moms and eagle dads – it’s the result of a community culture of supportive, hands-off parenting that encourages children to enjoy themselves and try everything, without any emphasis on winning.

Karen Crouse is an award-winning New York Times reporter who stumbled upon this quiet village that has the secret to not only raising better athletes, but happier and healthier kids. Her new book is "Norwich: One Tiny Vermont Town’s Secret to Happiness and Excellence."

David DeSteno is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University, where he directs the Social Emotions Group. He is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the American Psychological Association, for which he serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Emotion.

His book, "Emotional Success" provides an accessible and powerful path to grit: our prosocial emotions. These feelings – gratitude, compassion and pride – are easier to generate than the willpower and self-denial that underpin traditional approaches to grit. And, while willpower is quickly depleted, prosocial emotions actually become stronger the more we use them. These emotions have another crucial advantage: they’re contagious.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Supporters of changing Saratoga Springs’ system of government are preparing for a narrow defeat after the counting of absentee ballots.

If you saw a toothpick on the floor, what would you do?

This seemingly innocuous question was posed to Subir Chowdhury by one of his longtime clients, and ultimately lead him to a profound realization: good enough is not enough. The best processes in the world won't work without developing the kind of mindset — a caring mindset — that is needed to achieve real and sustainable change in both organizations and individuals.

A guide to living a successful life and career, Chowdhury's new book is The Difference.

The Airbnb Story

May 5, 2017

Fortune editor Leigh Gallagher explores the success of Airbnb along with the more controversial side of its story. Regulators want to curb its rapid expansion; hotel industry leaders wrestle with the disruption it has caused them; and residents and customers alike struggle with the unintended consequences of opening up private homes for public consumption.

Gallagher's book is ​The Airbnb Story: How Three Ordinary Guys Disrupted an Industry, Made Billions ... and Created Plenty of Controversy.

Danielle Krysa is the writer/curator behind the contemporary art website The Jealous Curator, and the author of Creative Block and Collage.

Her new book is Your Inner Critic Is a Big Jerk: And Other Truths About Being Creative.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tracy Kidder's new book, A Truck Full of Money, chronicles the life of Paul English, a kinetic and unconventional inventor, philanthropist and entrepreneur suffering from bipolar disorder, who co-founded the travel website Kayak, which sold for almost 2-Billion dollars.

Young, searching, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed fifty dollars from his father and launched a company with one simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost running shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed eight thousand dollars that first year, 1963.

Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In this age of start-ups, Knight’s Nike is the gold standard, and its swoosh is more than a logo. A symbol of grace and greatness, it’s one of the few icons instantly recognized in every corner of the world.

Phil Knight's new book is Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike.


  Mike Birbiglia is an award winning comedian, writer, actor, and director known for his autobiographical stand-up tours and one-man shows on Broadway. His first feature film, Sleepwalk with Me, was released in 2012.

His second film, Don’t Think Twice, opens this Friday at Spectrum 8 Theatre in Albany, NY and at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, NY. This story is Birbiglia’s first major work not based on his own life -- in it, an improv group called The Commune has reigned as the big fish in the small pond of their New York improv theater. When not all members of the group start to find success beyond the improv stage -- the group fractures, friendships are strained and feelings are hurt. It’s a funny movie about failure and success -- and how success doesn't always look the way you think it will.

The film is produced by This American Life host and creator Ira Glass, was written and directed by Birbiglia and he stars along with Keegan-Michael Key, Gillian Jacobs, Kate Micucci, Chris Gethard, and Tami Sagher.

  Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Charles Duhigg’s first book The Power of Habit has spent over 150 weeks on the NYT bestseller lists.

In his new book, Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business, he looks to explain why some people and companies are able to get so much more done than others. 

  What does it take to succeed? This question has fueled a long running debate. Some have argued that humans are a fundamentally competitive, and that pursuing self-interest is the best way to get ahead. Others claim that humans are born to cooperate and that we are most successful when we collaborate with others.

  Throughout history, there are some events that stand out as so groundbreaking that they completely change life as we know it. The Apollo moon landing of 1969 was one of those events—the invention of the Apple personal computer was another.

Former CEO of both PepsiCo and Apple, John Sculley writes about technology, business, and the future in his book, Moonshot!: Game-Changing Strategies to Build Billion-Dollar Businesses.

  In his book, The Power of Habit, award-winning New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed.

  Novelist Meg Wolitzer has written several popular novels including, The Wife, The Ten-Year Nap, and The Uncoupling. Her new novel is an exploration of friendship, coming-of-age, talent and success. The Interestings follows six artistic friends who meet as teenagers one pivotal summer at a camp called Spirit-in-the-Woods.