supreme court

Last week we discussed the importance of taking political campaigns back from big donors. This week we begin examining the complexity of reinstating limitations without damaging what should be protected speech.

  The Supreme Court has released some of its highly-anticipated rulings — but with only eight justices weighing in.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern — a Democrat from the 2nd district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Merrick Garland hasn’t gotten a fair shake. 

  With only eight jurists, the Supreme Court has been punting of late.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays talks about this new paradigm with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  The Supreme Court is one justice shy of a baseball team.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock he hopes the Merrick Garland standoff doesn’t set a new precedent.

  How did gay and lesbian couples’ right to marry go from unthinkable to inevitable? How did the individual right to bear arms, dismissed as fraudulent by Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1990, become a constitutional right in 2008? And what compelled President George W. Bush to rein in many of his initiatives in the war on terror before leaving office, even though past presidents have had a free hand in wartime? We are likely to answer that, in each case, the Supreme Court remade our nation’s most fundamental law.

Yet as the award-winning legal scholar David Cole argues in Engines of Liberty, citizen activists are the true drivers of constitutional change.

  January 20th, 2017. That’s the earliest Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell thinks the next Supreme Court justice should be named.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about her new “SCOTUS” bill. 

  Merrick Garland appears qualified for the Supreme Court, but he’s stuck in limbo.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock continues his conversation with former Deputy Solicitor General of the U.S. Philip Lacovara. 

  Will Merrick Garland get a vote in the Senate in 2016?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Paul Tonko tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Republicans have gravely miscalculated.

  In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays and WAMC’s Alan Chartock continue their conversation about the Supreme Court’s vacancy.

Should Americans get used to an eight-person Supreme Court?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Alan Chartock is joined by Union College political science professor Brad Hays to discuss the possibility that Antonin Scalia will be replaced.

In 1927 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Buck v Bell that the state of Virginia was allowed to sterilize Carrie Buck, a young woman wrongly thought to be feeble minded. Imbecile: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck by NY Times bestselling author Adam Cohen exposes the story of one of the darkest moments in American legal tradition- the Supreme Court’s decision to champion eugenic sterilization of undesirable citizens for the greater good for the country. The 8-1 ruling was signed by some of the most revered figures in American law including Chief Justice William Howard Taft, a former U.S. President and Louis Brandeis, a progressive icon. Oliver Wendell Holmes considered by many the greatest Supreme Court justice in history wrote the majority opinion. 

Republicans are standing firm, saying the next president should nominate the person to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court, not President Obama, who is in his final year in office.

  President Obama has more than 300 days left in office.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the White House intends to nominate a new Supreme Court justice during that time. 

This is picture of Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Murphy
http://www.murphy.senate.gov/newsroom/press-kit

Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Murphy is urging his Republican colleagues to hold a confirmation process for a Supreme Court Justice nominee.

  An eight-person Supreme Court is either an emergency or the new normal depending on who you ask.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Richard Neal tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that President Obama isn’t a lame duck for another eight months. 

Brad Hays: An Opportunity For Merit

Feb 26, 2016

By now, the politics of selecting the next Supreme Court justice have become clear.  President Obama has pledged to fulfill his constitutional responsibility by nominating someone to fill the seat opened by Justice Antonin Scalia's death.  Republicans in the Senate have pledged to block any such nomination.  In short, the crisis of federal judicial selection that has plagued lower court nominations for decades is now prominently on display and, regrettably, promises more of what we have come to expect in our politics: partisanship and gridlock.  But, crisis, they say, creates opportunity and this moment creates an opportunity for more meritorious politics.

  The death of Antonin Scalia led to a political standoff in a matter of hours.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the late jurist must be replaced ASAP. 

  Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died last weekend at the age of 79.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Alan Chartock speaks with New York Congressman, Paul Tonko, about what will happen next.

The death of Antonin Scalia this weekend has opened up a veritable Pandora’s box with major implications for the remainder of President Obama’s term, the balance of power in the Senate and the upcoming presidential election. It’s a game-changer, and we’re going to talk about what happens next today on the show. Albany Law Professor Stephen Gottlieb joins us.

Union College

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died suddenly on Saturday. The man known for his strong convictions and conservative stance was 79. Union College associate professor of political science Brad Hayes offered his thoughts on the outpouring of praise for Scalia from politicians on the right and left.

  In his new book - Unfit for Democracy – WAMC Commentator and Albany Law Professor Stephen Gottlieb takes a critical look at the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts, asserting that the interpretation of constitutional law should be applied with a focus on preserving the system of government put in place by our founding fathers.

He joins us this morning to discuss Unfit for Democracy and preview his hour-long conversation tomorrow at Albany Law School with Alan Chartock beginning at 1PM at the Law School’s Dean Alexander Moot Courtroom. That sit-down will be aired at a later date here on WAMC and will take place in front of a live audience and is open to the public.

Prof. Gottlieb, Albany Law School's Jay and Ruth Caplan Distinguished Professor of Law, is the author of Morality Imposed: The Rehnquist Court and the State of Liberty in America he is also an expert on the Supreme Court, constitutional theory and election campaign law.

  Unions could be weakened depending a Supreme Court decision.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Were President Obama’s executive actions on immigration legal?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the Supreme Court may have to answer that question.

 Thurgood Marshall the first African American to be nominated to the Supreme Court, brought down the separate but equal doctrine, integrated schools, worked with the NAACP's legal defense fund, and not only fought for human rights and human dignity, but also made them impossible to deny in the courts and in the streets. In a new biography, Showdown: Thurgood Marshall And The Supreme Court Nomination That Changed America, award winning author, Will Haygood, details the life and career of one of the most transformative legal minds of the past one hundred years.

How much do we think we know about the First Amendment? How many of us have looked at and considered the full text? More than likely we rely not on our own reading of the document and its various clauses, but on our Supreme Court’s interpretations and rulings to flesh out its true intent. But, what if the Supreme Court got it wrong?

Burt Neuborne, a former legal director of the ACLU, who has argued many cases before the Supreme Court, contends that oftentimes they have gotten it wrong. In his new book, Madison's Music: On Reading the First Amendment, Neuborne demonstrates that by failing to relate to the text as a coherent whole, the court has incrementally and collectively warped the original intent of the First Amendment.

  The nation’s highest court returns for its next term in October.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Supreme Court isn’t immune from political developments.

The Supreme Court has handed down several landmark decisions in the last week that have dominated headlines and stirred great debate across the country. From the decision to uphold President Obama’s healthcare law, to the decision to make same-sex marriage legal nationwide, to putting redistricting in the hands of voters, the court’s rulings are what we’ll be discussing today. What do you think of the SCOTUS decisions? Are they history-making? Has the court gotten too political?

Stephen Gottlieb: Democracy’s Future In America

Jun 4, 2015

The Court has now decided that states can stop judges but only judges from personally asking for campaign contributions. It left all the rest of its protections of economic privilege in place.[1] Corporations can use treasury funds to flood the airwaves with political ads. Donors can hide their contributions behind a variety of specialized corporate entities. The one-tenth of one percent of the wealthiest Americans can dominate American politics directly and through their domination of corporate treasuries.

Supports and opponents agree: it was a decision that changed American politics. Now, on the fifth anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling known as Citizens United — which led to the rise of super PACs and millions in spending in election campaigns — Vermont Independent Senator Bernie Sanders has introduced a constitutional amendment to undo the ruling.

1/19/15 Panel

Jan 19, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, NYPIRG’s Legislative Director Blair Horner and WAMC newsman, Ray Graf.

Topics include U.S. Lawmakers in Cuba, Panetta on Paris Attacks, Supreme Court to Decide Marriage Rights for Gay Couples, Obama Seeks to Raise Taxes on Wealthy.

Pages