supreme court

  The nation’s highest court returns for its next term in October.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Supreme Court isn’t immune from political developments.

The Supreme Court has handed down several landmark decisions in the last week that have dominated headlines and stirred great debate across the country. From the decision to uphold President Obama’s healthcare law, to the decision to make same-sex marriage legal nationwide, to putting redistricting in the hands of voters, the court’s rulings are what we’ll be discussing today. What do you think of the SCOTUS decisions? Are they history-making? Has the court gotten too political?

Stephen Gottlieb: Democracy’s Future In America

Jun 4, 2015

The Court has now decided that states can stop judges but only judges from personally asking for campaign contributions. It left all the rest of its protections of economic privilege in place.[1] Corporations can use treasury funds to flood the airwaves with political ads. Donors can hide their contributions behind a variety of specialized corporate entities. The one-tenth of one percent of the wealthiest Americans can dominate American politics directly and through their domination of corporate treasuries.

How much do we think we know about the First Amendment? How many of us have looked at and considered the full text? More than likely we rely not on our own reading of the document and its various clauses, but on our Supreme Court’s interpretations and rulings to flesh out its true intent. But, what if the Supreme Court got it wrong?

Burt Neuborne, a former legal director of the ACLU, who has argued many cases before the Supreme Court, contends that oftentimes they have gotten it wrong. In his new book, Madison's Music: On Reading the First Amendment, Neuborne demonstrates that by failing to relate to the text as a coherent whole, the court has incrementally and collectively warped the original intent of the First Amendment.

Supports and opponents agree: it was a decision that changed American politics. Now, on the fifth anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling known as Citizens United — which led to the rise of super PACs and millions in spending in election campaigns — Vermont Independent Senator Bernie Sanders has introduced a constitutional amendment to undo the ruling.

1/19/15 Panel

Jan 19, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, NYPIRG’s Legislative Director Blair Horner and WAMC newsman, Ray Graf.

Topics include U.S. Lawmakers in Cuba, Panetta on Paris Attacks, Supreme Court to Decide Marriage Rights for Gay Couples, Obama Seeks to Raise Taxes on Wealthy.

  The new year could mean some major Supreme Court actions.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that same-sex marriage is due for a landmark decision.

  The midterms got all the attention, but the Supreme Court has plenty on its plate.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about some key upcoming decisions.

9/30/14 Panel

Sep 30, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf, and Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
White House Intruder
Hong Kong Protests
Supreme Court on Early Voting
Judge on Rikers Beating

Capitalism v. Democracy

Sep 15, 2014

  In the new book, Capitalism v. Democracy, law professor Timothy Kuhner looks to offer the keys to understanding why corporations are now citizens, money is political speech, limits on corporate spending are a form of censorship, democracy is a free market, and political equality and democratic integrity are unconstitutional constraints on money in politics.

Kuhner says Supreme Court opinions have dictated these conditions in the name of the Constitution and he explores the reasons behind these opinions, reveals that they form a blueprint for free market democracy, and demonstrates that this design corrupts both politics and markets.

Timothy Kuhner is Associate Professor at Georgia State University College of Law and we welcome him to The Roundtable this morning.

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