supreme court

Brad Hays: An Opportunity For Merit

Feb 26, 2016

By now, the politics of selecting the next Supreme Court justice have become clear.  President Obama has pledged to fulfill his constitutional responsibility by nominating someone to fill the seat opened by Justice Antonin Scalia's death.  Republicans in the Senate have pledged to block any such nomination.  In short, the crisis of federal judicial selection that has plagued lower court nominations for decades is now prominently on display and, regrettably, promises more of what we have come to expect in our politics: partisanship and gridlock.  But, crisis, they say, creates opportunity and this moment creates an opportunity for more meritorious politics.

  The death of Antonin Scalia led to a political standoff in a matter of hours.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the late jurist must be replaced ASAP. 

  Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died last weekend at the age of 79.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Alan Chartock speaks with New York Congressman, Paul Tonko, about what will happen next.

The death of Antonin Scalia this weekend has opened up a veritable Pandora’s box with major implications for the remainder of President Obama’s term, the balance of power in the Senate and the upcoming presidential election. It’s a game-changer, and we’re going to talk about what happens next today on the show. Albany Law Professor Stephen Gottlieb joins us.

Union College

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died suddenly on Saturday. The man known for his strong convictions and conservative stance was 79. Union College associate professor of political science Brad Hayes offered his thoughts on the outpouring of praise for Scalia from politicians on the right and left.

  In his new book - Unfit for Democracy – WAMC Commentator and Albany Law Professor Stephen Gottlieb takes a critical look at the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts, asserting that the interpretation of constitutional law should be applied with a focus on preserving the system of government put in place by our founding fathers.

He joins us this morning to discuss Unfit for Democracy and preview his hour-long conversation tomorrow at Albany Law School with Alan Chartock beginning at 1PM at the Law School’s Dean Alexander Moot Courtroom. That sit-down will be aired at a later date here on WAMC and will take place in front of a live audience and is open to the public.

Prof. Gottlieb, Albany Law School's Jay and Ruth Caplan Distinguished Professor of Law, is the author of Morality Imposed: The Rehnquist Court and the State of Liberty in America he is also an expert on the Supreme Court, constitutional theory and election campaign law.

  Unions could be weakened depending a Supreme Court decision.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Were President Obama’s executive actions on immigration legal?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the Supreme Court may have to answer that question.

 Thurgood Marshall the first African American to be nominated to the Supreme Court, brought down the separate but equal doctrine, integrated schools, worked with the NAACP's legal defense fund, and not only fought for human rights and human dignity, but also made them impossible to deny in the courts and in the streets. In a new biography, Showdown: Thurgood Marshall And The Supreme Court Nomination That Changed America, award winning author, Will Haygood, details the life and career of one of the most transformative legal minds of the past one hundred years.

How much do we think we know about the First Amendment? How many of us have looked at and considered the full text? More than likely we rely not on our own reading of the document and its various clauses, but on our Supreme Court’s interpretations and rulings to flesh out its true intent. But, what if the Supreme Court got it wrong?

Burt Neuborne, a former legal director of the ACLU, who has argued many cases before the Supreme Court, contends that oftentimes they have gotten it wrong. In his new book, Madison's Music: On Reading the First Amendment, Neuborne demonstrates that by failing to relate to the text as a coherent whole, the court has incrementally and collectively warped the original intent of the First Amendment.