taliban

The Roundtable
11:48 am
Tue May 27, 2014

"No Good Men Among The Living: America, The Taliban, And The War Through Afghan Eyes" By Anand Gopal

    In No Good Men Among The Living: America, The Taliban, And The War Through Afghan Eyes acclaimed journalist Anand Gopal traces in vivid detail the lives of three Afghans caught in America’s war on terror. He follows a Taliban commander, who rises from scrawny teenager to leading insurgent; a US-backed warlord, who uses the American military to gain personal wealth and power; and a village housewife trapped between the two sides, who discovers the devastating cost of neutrality.

Through their dramatic stories, Gopal shows that the Afghan war, so often regarded as a hopeless quagmire, could in fact have gone very differently. Top Taliban leaders actually tried to surrender within months of the US invasion, renouncing all political activity and submitting to the new government. Effectively, the Taliban ceased to exist—yet the Americans were unwilling to accept such a turnaround. Instead, driven by false intelligence from their allies and an unyielding mandate to fight terrorism, American forces continued to press the conflict, resurrecting the insurgency that persists to this day.

World News
7:39 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Blast Rocks Kabul; Dozens Wounded, Attackers Killed

Debris littered the street at the scene of today's attack in Kabul.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 8:57 am

Men wearing bombs strapped to their bodies and traveling in two vehicles carrying more explosives wounded dozens of civilians in Kabul today when they attacked a government security office, NPR's Sean Carberry reports from the scene.

Sean tells the NPR Newscast desk that the Taliban is claiming responsibility and that:

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Commentary & Opinion
12:28 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Rabbi Michael Rothbaum: A Picture's Worth a Thousand Lives

When the most recent Iraq war began, I was serving as student rabbi at a wonderful little synagogue in New England.  One of the regulars at our monthly Torah study was a World War II veteran – let’s call him Sam.  Sam would always bring consideration and deep insight to text study.  But more than that, Sam was – and is – a mensh.

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