teacher evaluations

Two words — “sharp dissent” — are not normally used in the same sentence as “New York State Board of Regents.”

Lucas Willard / WAMC

From Common Core testing to teacher evaluations, education is one of the most contentious issues in New York right now. About two dozen teachers, administrators, and union officials participated in a roundtable discussion this morning to offer their own ideas on the state’s education policies with their local Assemblymember and Regent Board member.

  Disagreements that have roiled the state’s education community in the wake of new teacher evaluation laws approved by Governor Andrew Cuomo and the legislature as part of the budget were highlighted at a day long summit called by education officials.

Principals, teachers and school boards have objected to the tight deadline in the law, as well as the greater reliance on standardized tests, a component that Governor  Cuomo has insisted upon.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

There’s growing support in the state legislature to address controversial aspects of New York State’s Common Core learning standards and related testing.

classroom
en.wikipedia.org

  Less than a month after it was enacted, Governor Cuomo’s new teacher evaluation plan seems to be in jeopardy, with the Regents Chancellor calling for a year’s delay and a key Senator saying the legislature needs to revisit the issue.

When Cuomo convinced the legislature to approve a new teacher evaluation system that relies more on standardized tests, his administration said that the State Board of Regents would have very limited power to make any changes including compliance with a November deadline to come up with new performance reviews.

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State Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch wants to give school districts another year to implement the state-mandated teacher evaluation system. The controversial evaluation plan has already been a motivating point for students to opt-out of the state Common Core testing. Tisch said Cuomo’s deadline of November 15th for districts to approve of the new teacher rating system is unrealistic. Tisch wants to move the date back until September 1st, 2016.

Karen Magee: Teaching Is An Art

Jun 11, 2014

When I taught special education in my hometown of Harrison, one of my students achieved an educational milestone.

New York state education officials have adopted a safety net for teacher candidates who fail a newly required "bar exam."

The Board of Regents on Tuesday agreed to let student teachers who fail this year or next use a passing score on a previous test as proof they're ready to teach.

Before the Regents vote, any teacher graduating college after May 1 was going to have to pass the bar exam — called the edTPA  — to be certified. The test requires video and written proof of a would-be teacher's skills.

edTPA, the new portfolio assessment required for student-teachers in New York, has come under criticism. One of New York's teachers' unions wants it suspended.

Deal ensures NY teacher-evaluations don't expire

Mar 26, 2013
wikipedia commons

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders say they've come up with a plan to ensure that school district teacher-evaluation systems remain in place until they're re-negotiated.

Monday's agreement addresses a concern at the center of an impasse between New York City and its teachers union that caused city schools to miss a deadline for adopting an evaluation plan. That cost the district $260 million in state aid.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg has said he didn't want an agreement that would expire before it could weed out ineffective teachers.

With the school year starting for students across New York State in the coming weeks, there are several new programs being implemented. WAMC's Brian Shields spoke with Tim Kremer of the New York State School Boards Association about the new policies, including teacher evaluations and anti-bullying programs.

The Massachusetts House has approved a measure calling on school districts to implement a new teacher evaluation system and place performance ahead of seniority in deciding future layoffs.  WAMC’s Lucas Willard reports…

The legislation, which has already been approved by the Senate, resulted from a compromise struck between the Massachusetts Teachers Association and an advocacy group called Stand for Children that had proposed a statewide ballot question.

The organization has said it would be willing to drop the ballot initiative if the bill becomes law.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo on Monday signed the teacher evaluation bill into law. Parents will be able to see the evaluations for their own child’s teacher, but the information will not be available to the general public or the media. Tim Kremer , the executive director of the New York State School Boards Association tells WAMC’s Brian Shields that the evaluation system , which the governor has described as evolving, needs to become more valid.

Governor Cuomo is telling the legislature to ‘take it or leave it’ over a new bill he’s released new bill outlining how to make teacher evaluations public.  Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt reports…  

Governor Cuomo says he introduced legislation on the publication of teacher evaluations just before his own self imposed deadline of midnight Monday in order to clarify his position on the issue.  He says it’s up the Assembly and Senate whether they want to pass it, exactly as is, or not.  

  A new superintendent has been selected to lead the second largest public school system in Massachusetts.   The next  superintendent of schools in Springfield Massachusetts is a home grown product,  as we hear from WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill.

        Daniel Warwick, who started his career in education in 1976  as a teacher in the Springfield Public Schools, became a principal, a special education  supervisor, and eventually deputy superintendent, has been picked to be the  troubled urban school districts new chief administrator.

Governor Cuomo says he no longer thinks settling the issue of making teacher evaluations public “urgent,” and will allow the legislature to leave later this week without an agreement on the matter.  Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt reports…  

Cuomo, speaking on former Governor David Paterson’s radio show on WOR, says the legislature will end its session for the summer without acting on a plan on how to make public teacher evaluations public, saying that the evaluations do not have to be completed by schools until January, anyway.