technology

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Sen. Charles Schumer says wireless emergency alerts should include photos — that includes the one sent to millions of New Yorkers last week about a bombing suspect.

  There's a lot of interest in teaching people how to write code. This interest encompasses lots of issues including increasing diversity among coders as well as moving beyond the business-oriented world of coding to other worlds such as arts and sciences. Are coding languages becoming just another way of communicating? We'll talk about those issues.

There are several avenues of exploration and development to talk about, and the diversity and organization (or lack thereof) in the development communities mean that there are lots of choices to make.

And, not to be left out, is this all about sixth-graders? Is there any hope for older folks (including many of the folk who are coding and developing the vast amount of software that we all rely on every day).

And what does it mean when people say that millennials are the first digital native generation?

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us. 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Semiconductor manufacturer GLOBALFOUNDRIES announced that it is working toward the next technological breakthrough of 7 nanometer technology.

  Over the past decade a new and controversial energy extraction method known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has rocketed to the forefront of U.S. energy production. With fracking, millions of gallons of water, dangerous chemicals, and sand are injected under high pressure deep into the earth, fracturing hard rock to release oil and gas.

Wenonah Hauter, one of the nation’s leading public interest advocates, argues that the rush to fracking is dangerous to the environment and treacherous to human health. Frackopoly describes how the fracking industry began; the technologies that make it possible; and the destruction and poisoning of clean water sources and the release of harmful radiation from deep inside shale deposits, creating what the author calls “sacrifice zones” across the American landscape.

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BTV Ignite

Burlington and technology officials announced the city’s first “Innovation Week” to be held in October.  The goal is to highlight the region’s emerging technology “ecosystem.”

  Scott Woolley's new book, The Network: The Battle for the Airwaves and the Birth of the Communications Age is the origin story of the airwaves - the foundational technology of the communications age - as told through the forty-year friendship of an entrepreneurial industrialist and a brilliant inventor.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss augmented and virtual reality. What are they and what is the difference? We will get into that in just a moment.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources.

Paper By Mark Kurlansky

Aug 15, 2016

  Paper is one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past two millennia, the ability to produce it in ever more efficient ways has supported the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art; it has formed the foundation of civilizations, promoting revolutions and restoring stability.

Now, amid discussion of “going paperless”―and as speculation about the effects of a digitally dependent society grows rampant― we’ve come to a world-historic juncture. By tracing paper’s evolution from antiquity to the present, with an emphasis on the contributions made in Asia and the Middle East, Mark Kurlansky challenges common assumptions about technology’s influence, affirming that paper is here to stay.

  Novelist Liz Moore’s latest is The Unseen World , which tells the moving story of a daughter’s quest to discover the truth about her beloved father’s hidden past.

The story begins in a computer science lab in 1980s-era Boston and follows the girl’s quest to figure out her father’s secrets in a virtual universe. 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

If you’re unfamiliar with the world of Pokémon, you may not recognize the names of the virtual monsters being discovered in your neighborhood.

  Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998. He focuses on science, technology, and public health. Since joining the magazine, he has written about agricultural biotechnology, the global AIDS epidemic, avian influenza, malaria, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, synthetic biology, the debate over the meaning of our carbon footprint and new ways to edit DNA.

Specter came to The New Yorker from The New York Times, where he had been a roving foreign correspondent based in Rome. From 1995 to 1998, Specter served as the Times Moscow bureau chief.

Since 2012, Specter has been a Visiting Professor at Bard College, in the department of Environmental and Urban Affairs.

Michael Specter will be at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington tomorow at 7 p.m. His talk is titled: Editing the Human Genome: The Possibilities and Perils. 

  We used to say "seeing is believing"; now googling is believing. With 24/7 access to nearly all of the world's information at our fingertips, we no longer trek to the library or the encyclopedia shelf in search of answers.

While a wealth of literature has been devoted to life with the Internet, The Internet of Us: Knowing More and Understanding Less in the Age of Big Data by Michael Patrick Lynch is the first book to take a look at the deep philosophicalimplications of this seismic shift have not been properly explored until now.

  Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler from North Country Consulting fills us in on (some of) what's going on with the Apple and the Department of Justice/FBI battle of an encrypted iPhone used by one of the San Bernadino participants.

He talks about the issues and some incidental extras that have recently emerged and ask the question: What does all this mean for the big picture, and, by the way, does it have anything to do with your own data and how you protect it? (Yes.)

Sen. Charles Schumer is calling on phone carriers to make robocall blocking technology available to landline and cellphone customers.

  Technology is becoming ever more capable of doing jobs that we once thought were only capable of being done by humans like driving cars,  unpacking boxes, driving cars, detecting emotions, even analyzing legal documents. For centuries technological innovation mostly complemented human labor by creating new and better jobs, facilitating higher productivity, and improving standards of living, but now many fear the technological advancement has reached a point where it will no longer complement many forms of labor but replace them all together. 

In His new book, Humans Are Underrated: What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will, fortune senior editor at large, Geoff Colvin, argues that despite our growing anxiety of a world that technology puts a majority of people out of work that this bleak future is not inevitable. 

  Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us this morning to discuss technology and our automobiles.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, consultant, trainer, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs unveiled its new mobile app to help the state’s 900,000 vets connect to important state and federal programs.

  It's only the beginning of the year, but a leading contender for the word of 2016 may be dark. Dark is everywhere these days: dark money, dark fiber, dark matter, and dark software.

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler is here to tell is about the latter.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Today, Jesse joins us to talk about what's new in home automation for smart control and energy savings.

  Legendary "space statesman" Buzz Aldrin is a vital advocate for the continuing quest to push the boundaries of the universe as we know it.

As a pioneering astronaut who first set foot on the moon during mankind's first landing of Apollo 11--and as an aerospace engineer who designed an orbital rendezvous technique critical to future planetary landings--Aldrin has a vision, and in his new book, Mission to Mars: My Vision for Space Exploration, he plots out the path he proposes, taking humans to Mars by 2035.

http://dailygenius.com/

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Jesse joins us this morning to talk about the author/technology/issues of publishing. Some formats (200-page and shorter books) are becoming more feasible today than they were years ago. There also are more and more self-published books of all lengths around.

  Every year, perhaps even every week, there is some new gadget, device, service, or other digital offering intended to make our lives easier, better, more fun, or more instantaneous–making it that much harder to question how anything digital can be bad for us. Digital has created some wonderful things and we can hardly imagine life without them.

But digital—the most relentless social and economic juggernaut humanity has unleashed in centuries—is also destroying much of what we’ve taken for granted.

In Digital is Destroying Everything, Andrew Edwards takes us on a tour of today’s “blasted heath”, where many things we’ve held dear have been uprooted or entirely changed by digital–and where many new and intriguing flora and fauna are sprouting.

  We live in an age of awesome technological potential. From nanotechnology to synthetic organisms, new technologies stand to revolutionize whole domains of human experience.

One thing these technologies can’t do is answer the profound moral issues they raise. Who should be held accountable when they go wrong?

Wendell Wallach's book, A Dangerous Master forces us to confront the practical - and moral - purposes of our creations.

Rabbi Dan Ornstein: Losing the iPhone, Finding The I

Jul 23, 2015

The Vacation by Wendell Berry

Like any good poem, this one by the poet, Wendell Berry, employs a concrete  metaphor – a man who misses every moment of his vacation because he is too busy recording it – to examine a universal theme: how we absent ourselves from our own lives when we rush through them, disengaged, contracting them out to someone or something else.  Berry uses the word, “move”, with great rhythmic and symbolic effect.  We feel like we are on that speed boat with our vacationer, peering through his video lens at all the beauty which the film captures more accurately than our own minds.  However, for all the movement, there is nothing really moving about the experience:  the man’s camera is a pathetic emotional replacement for the man himself.  Berry also repeats deceptively simple phrases like “have it”, “having it”, “be there”, “would be” and “would not be”.  This turns the poem into a mournful tune about how technological devices are becoming our stand-ins for authentic living.

  After a decade designing technologies meant to address education, health, and global poverty, award-winning computer scientist Kentaro Toyama came to a difficult conclusion: Even in an age of amazing technology, social progress depends on human changes that gadgets can’t deliver.

He writes about it in his book, Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology .

  This morning we will discuss important tech issues with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

This morning we will focus on the idea of non-profits as innovators and we will also welcome Gail Nayowith, an expert in nonprofit organization management.

  Throughout history, there are some events that stand out as so groundbreaking that they completely change life as we know it. The Apollo moon landing of 1969 was one of those events—the invention of the Apple personal computer was another.

Former CEO of both PepsiCo and Apple, John Sculley writes about technology, business, and the future in his book, Moonshot!: Game-Changing Strategies to Build Billion-Dollar Businesses.

  Libraries today are more important than ever. More than just book repositories, libraries can become a defense against some of the most crucial challenges of our age: unequal access to education, jobs, and information.

In BiblioTech, John Palfrey argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online. And libraries, which play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, are at risk.

In order to survive our rapidly modernizing world and dwindling government funding, libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible—by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online.

apple.com

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools. His books include: Swift for Dummies and iOS App Development for Dummies.

He is our tech guru and joins us today to talk about wearable technology.

'Becoming Steve Jobs'

Apr 1, 2015

  There have been many books about Steve Jobs, one of the most famous CEOs in history. But the new book Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs.

The conventional, one-dimensional view of Jobs is that he was half-genius, half-jerk from youth, an irascible and selfish leader who slighted friends and family alike.

Becoming Steve Jobs answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people?

The new book is: Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader by journalists Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli.

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