technology

  Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998. He focuses on science, technology, and public health. Since joining the magazine, he has written about agricultural biotechnology, the global AIDS epidemic, avian influenza, malaria, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, synthetic biology, the debate over the meaning of our carbon footprint and new ways to edit DNA.

Specter came to The New Yorker from The New York Times, where he had been a roving foreign correspondent based in Rome. From 1995 to 1998, Specter served as the Times Moscow bureau chief.

Since 2012, Specter has been a Visiting Professor at Bard College, in the department of Environmental and Urban Affairs.

Michael Specter will be at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington tomorow at 7 p.m. His talk is titled: Editing the Human Genome: The Possibilities and Perils. 

  We used to say "seeing is believing"; now googling is believing. With 24/7 access to nearly all of the world's information at our fingertips, we no longer trek to the library or the encyclopedia shelf in search of answers.

While a wealth of literature has been devoted to life with the Internet, The Internet of Us: Knowing More and Understanding Less in the Age of Big Data by Michael Patrick Lynch is the first book to take a look at the deep philosophicalimplications of this seismic shift have not been properly explored until now.

  Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler from North Country Consulting fills us in on (some of) what's going on with the Apple and the Department of Justice/FBI battle of an encrypted iPhone used by one of the San Bernadino participants.

He talks about the issues and some incidental extras that have recently emerged and ask the question: What does all this mean for the big picture, and, by the way, does it have anything to do with your own data and how you protect it? (Yes.)

Sen. Charles Schumer is calling on phone carriers to make robocall blocking technology available to landline and cellphone customers.

  Technology is becoming ever more capable of doing jobs that we once thought were only capable of being done by humans like driving cars,  unpacking boxes, driving cars, detecting emotions, even analyzing legal documents. For centuries technological innovation mostly complemented human labor by creating new and better jobs, facilitating higher productivity, and improving standards of living, but now many fear the technological advancement has reached a point where it will no longer complement many forms of labor but replace them all together. 

In His new book, Humans Are Underrated: What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will, fortune senior editor at large, Geoff Colvin, argues that despite our growing anxiety of a world that technology puts a majority of people out of work that this bleak future is not inevitable. 

  Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us this morning to discuss technology and our automobiles.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, consultant, trainer, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs unveiled its new mobile app to help the state’s 900,000 vets connect to important state and federal programs.

  It's only the beginning of the year, but a leading contender for the word of 2016 may be dark. Dark is everywhere these days: dark money, dark fiber, dark matter, and dark software.

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler is here to tell is about the latter.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Today, Jesse joins us to talk about what's new in home automation for smart control and energy savings.

  Legendary "space statesman" Buzz Aldrin is a vital advocate for the continuing quest to push the boundaries of the universe as we know it.

As a pioneering astronaut who first set foot on the moon during mankind's first landing of Apollo 11--and as an aerospace engineer who designed an orbital rendezvous technique critical to future planetary landings--Aldrin has a vision, and in his new book, Mission to Mars: My Vision for Space Exploration, he plots out the path he proposes, taking humans to Mars by 2035.

http://dailygenius.com/

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Jesse joins us this morning to talk about the author/technology/issues of publishing. Some formats (200-page and shorter books) are becoming more feasible today than they were years ago. There also are more and more self-published books of all lengths around.

  Every year, perhaps even every week, there is some new gadget, device, service, or other digital offering intended to make our lives easier, better, more fun, or more instantaneous–making it that much harder to question how anything digital can be bad for us. Digital has created some wonderful things and we can hardly imagine life without them.

But digital—the most relentless social and economic juggernaut humanity has unleashed in centuries—is also destroying much of what we’ve taken for granted.

In Digital is Destroying Everything, Andrew Edwards takes us on a tour of today’s “blasted heath”, where many things we’ve held dear have been uprooted or entirely changed by digital–and where many new and intriguing flora and fauna are sprouting.

  We live in an age of awesome technological potential. From nanotechnology to synthetic organisms, new technologies stand to revolutionize whole domains of human experience.

One thing these technologies can’t do is answer the profound moral issues they raise. Who should be held accountable when they go wrong?

Wendell Wallach's book, A Dangerous Master forces us to confront the practical - and moral - purposes of our creations.

Rabbi Dan Ornstein: Losing the iPhone, Finding The I

Jul 23, 2015

The Vacation by Wendell Berry

Like any good poem, this one by the poet, Wendell Berry, employs a concrete  metaphor – a man who misses every moment of his vacation because he is too busy recording it – to examine a universal theme: how we absent ourselves from our own lives when we rush through them, disengaged, contracting them out to someone or something else.  Berry uses the word, “move”, with great rhythmic and symbolic effect.  We feel like we are on that speed boat with our vacationer, peering through his video lens at all the beauty which the film captures more accurately than our own minds.  However, for all the movement, there is nothing really moving about the experience:  the man’s camera is a pathetic emotional replacement for the man himself.  Berry also repeats deceptively simple phrases like “have it”, “having it”, “be there”, “would be” and “would not be”.  This turns the poem into a mournful tune about how technological devices are becoming our stand-ins for authentic living.

  After a decade designing technologies meant to address education, health, and global poverty, award-winning computer scientist Kentaro Toyama came to a difficult conclusion: Even in an age of amazing technology, social progress depends on human changes that gadgets can’t deliver.

He writes about it in his book, Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology .

  This morning we will discuss important tech issues with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

This morning we will focus on the idea of non-profits as innovators and we will also welcome Gail Nayowith, an expert in nonprofit organization management.

  Throughout history, there are some events that stand out as so groundbreaking that they completely change life as we know it. The Apollo moon landing of 1969 was one of those events—the invention of the Apple personal computer was another.

Former CEO of both PepsiCo and Apple, John Sculley writes about technology, business, and the future in his book, Moonshot!: Game-Changing Strategies to Build Billion-Dollar Businesses.

  Libraries today are more important than ever. More than just book repositories, libraries can become a defense against some of the most crucial challenges of our age: unequal access to education, jobs, and information.

In BiblioTech, John Palfrey argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online. And libraries, which play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, are at risk.

In order to survive our rapidly modernizing world and dwindling government funding, libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible—by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online.

apple.com

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools. His books include: Swift for Dummies and iOS App Development for Dummies.

He is our tech guru and joins us today to talk about wearable technology.

'Becoming Steve Jobs'

Apr 1, 2015

  There have been many books about Steve Jobs, one of the most famous CEOs in history. But the new book Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs.

The conventional, one-dimensional view of Jobs is that he was half-genius, half-jerk from youth, an irascible and selfish leader who slighted friends and family alike.

Becoming Steve Jobs answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people?

The new book is: Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader by journalists Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli.

Marist, CNR Collaborate On Technology Management

Mar 27, 2015
Courtesy of Marist College

Two colleges in the Hudson Valley are teaming up for technology. One college is a leader in cloud computing and is offering its services to another campus two counties to the south. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne has more on the new hookup.

  This morning we will discuss important tech issues with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools. His books include: Swift for Dummies and iOS App Development for Dummies.

Today he joins us to talk about Agile software development.

  The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World is a new book that considers the technologically focused life many of us live, with its impacts on our children, relationships, communities, health, work, and more, and suggests opportunities for those of us longing to cultivate a richer on- and off-line existence.

By examining the connected world through the lens of her own internet fast, Christina Crook is looking to create a convincing case for increasing intentionality in our day-to-day lives.

This morning we will discuss issues involving cyber crime with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

His books include: the forthcoming - Swift for Dummies (coming from Wiley in early 2015) and iOS App Development for Dummies (Wiley, 2014).

Jesse Feiler - Hacking

Jan 20, 2015

This morning we will discuss issues involving internet security and the secrets of hacking with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

His books include: the forthcoming - Swift for Dummies (coming from Wiley in early 2015) and iOS App Development for Dummies (Wiley, 2014).

Herbert London: The Other Side of Technology

Nov 26, 2014

While the wizards of new technology wax lyrically about the wonders of technological development, there is another side, one often overlooked in the avalanche of new products. Clearly computers have changed our lives, opened new horizons of learning and have abbreviated research efforts, but there are hidden societal costs that are unnoticed or intentionally ignored.

    

  Joe and Jesse discuss cutting the cable TV cord. Is it possible? What does it take? How much does it cost? What are the things to think about? Is this a movement for techs and weirdos or is it mainstream?

On the weekend of November 15th, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute hosted its very first Hackathon – a weekend-long design and developer competition drawing over 500 engineering students from around the country.

The idea was to create something from nothing in 24 short hours, using imagination, innovation, and maybe a little bit of caffeine. Hackathon competitions are a growing trend in the United States and the United Kingdom, and have become a very viable way for companies to recruit future employees.

  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean?

For future generations, it won’t mean anything very obvious. They will be so immersed in online life that questions about the Internet’s basic purpose or meaning will vanish.

In his book, The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection, Michael Harris places our situation in a rich historical context and helps us remember which parts of that earlier world we don’t want to lose forever. He urges us to look up—even briefly—from our screens.

    Legendary science fiction author William Gibson will read from his work on Sunday, November 9, at 7:00 p.m. in EMPAC Concert Hall.

Gibson is a visionary author of speculative fiction whose work explores the future implications of contemporary human technologies. His 1984 novel, Neuromancer, winner of the Nebula, Hugo, and Philip K. Dick awards, introduced the term "cyberspace" and have helped to define the popular culture of the Computer Age.

Gibson’s latest novel, The Peripheral, is about drones, drugs, outsourcing, telepresence, trailer parks, kleptocracy, and 3D fabbing.

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