technology

  Jonathan Coulton is a singer-songwriter, fan-cruise operator, public radio one-man-house-band, and internet personality -- if in fact that is still a thing. In 2005 the Yale educated computer programmer, pledged to release one song per week for a year to prove to himself that he could produce creative output to a deadline and to see whether a professional artist could use the Internet and Creative Commons to support himself. A hair more than a decade -- and a good many musical adventures -- later, Coulton is releasing a new full-length album, Solid State, tomorrow on SuperEgo records.

SuperEgo records is Aimee Mann’s label, and Jonathan Coulton is opening for her on tour - in support of the Solid State release and that of her new album, Mental Illness.  When the tour was at The Egg in Albany, NY earlier this week, Coulton came by the studio to talk about the concept album, its companion graphic novel (written by Matt Fraction and drawn by Albert Monteys), NPR’s Ask Me Another, and The Spongebob Musical.

corporateinsight.com

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of dealing with cyber continuity including cyber security and cyber continuity.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer and author. His most recent app is Utility Smart (in the App Store); recent books are "iPad for Seniors for Dummies" (Wiley), and "Exploring Swift Playgrounds"(Apress).  

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of dealing with almighty #hashtag on social media..

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant working mostly with iOS and FileMaker for nonprofits, small businesses, and other organizations. His most recent books are iPad for Seniors for Dummies and Learn Apple HomeKit on iOS.

John Simpson is the former chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, where he helped take the dictionary online.

His new book, The Word Detective: Searching for the Meaning of It All at the Oxford English Dictionary, is an intensely personal memoir and a joyful celebration of English, he weaves a story of how words come into being (and sometimes disappear), how culture shapes the language we use, and how technology has transformed not only the way we speak and write but also how words are made.

New York Times Foreign Affairs Columnist Thomas L. Friedman will give a presentation entitled "The Big Trends Shaping the World Today: Economics, Technology, and Geopolitics" at Proctors in Schenectady, NY on February 9th at 8 p.m. The event is presented by Union College.

Friedman is renowned for his direct reporting and sophisticated analysis of complex issues facing the world. His New York Times bestseller, co-written with Michael Mandelbaum, is That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back.

Friedman's The World is Flat sold over four million copies and won the inaugural Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award. In 2012, Friedman updated his National Book Award-winner, From Beirut to Jerusalem, adding a fresh discussion of the Arab Awakenings and Arab/Israeli relations in a new preface and afterword. His latest book, Thank You For Being Late, was released in Fall 2016.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us to discuss the ins-and-outs of dealing with your new iPad.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies.

His new book is: iPad For Seniors for Dummies – which we discuss this morning.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of writing code. Is it as difficult as it sounds?

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. His most recent books are “Learn Apple HomeKit on iOS” and “iPad for Seniors for Dummies.”

Current projects include Utility Smart to manage use of utility resources (with Curt Gervich at SUNY Plattsburgh Risk Management for Nonprofits).

Visit the Congressional App Challenge website.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tracy Kidder's new book, A Truck Full of Money, chronicles the life of Paul English, a kinetic and unconventional inventor, philanthropist and entrepreneur suffering from bipolar disorder, who co-founded the travel website Kayak, which sold for almost 2-Billion dollars.

Are you watching kids scroll through life, with their rapid-fire thumbs and a six-second attention span? Physician and filmmaker Delaney Ruston saw that with her own kids and learned that the average kid spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. She wondered about the impact of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time—friction she knew all too well. 

In Screenagers, Delaney takes a deeply personal approach as she probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including her own, to explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through poignant, and unexpectedly funny stories, along with surprising insights from authors, psychologists, and brain scientists, Screenagers reveals how tech time impacts kids’ development and offers solutions on how adults can empower kids to best navigate the digital world and find balance.

There will be a screening at the Maple Avenue Middle School at 7PM in Saratoga on 11/30.

We are joined by Delaney Ruston and Gina Karp, who currently teaches high school humanities (and previously taught grades 1-8) at the Waldorf School of Saratoga Springs.

The Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, New York, meant to herald the twentieth century, went tragically, spectacularly awry.

The Exposition opened with fanfare; its wonders, both strange and magnificent, dazzled the public. Then tragedy struck. In the early autumn of 1901, an assassin stalked the fairgrounds, waiting for President William McKinley. That was shocking enough, but there were more surprises in store.

In The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City: Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 World's Fair, Margaret S. Creighton lifts the curtain on the assassination of McKinley as well as on the fair’s lesser-known battles, involving both notorious and forgotten figures.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss social media in the news and as the news.  

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources. 

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BTV Ignite

The city of Burlington is showcasing its technology sector this week.  It’s a concerted effort to update the region’s image and call attention to Burlington’s position as one of the top 100 locations in the nation for tech business startups.

Champlain College "Flight" At Burlington International Airport
Pat Bradley/WAMC

There are two new interactive displays at the Burlington International Airport.  Designed and installed by students at Champlain College the intent is to showcase the city’s growing tech sector.

Designers create worlds and solve problems using design thinking. Look around your office or home—at the tablet or smartphone you may be holding or the chair you are sitting in. Everything in our lives was designed by someone. And every design starts with a problem that a designer or team of designers seeks to solve.

In Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans show us how design thinking can help us create a life that is both meaningful and fulfilling, regardless of who or where we are, what we do or have done for a living, or how young or old we are. The same design thinking responsible for amazing technology, products, and spaces can be used to design and build your career and your life, a life of fulfillment and joy, constantly creative and productive, one that always holds the possibility of surprise.

Children of the New World introduces readers to a near-future world of social media implants, memory manufacturers, dangerously immersive virtual reality games, and alarmingly intuitive robots. Many of these characters live in a utopian future of instant connection and technological gratification that belies an unbridgeable human distance, while others inhabit a post-collapse landscape made primitive by disaster, which they must work to rebuild as we once did millennia ago.

Alexander Wesinstein is the director of the Martha’s Vineyard Institute of Creative Writing. He is the recipient of a Sustainable Arts Foundation Award, and his stories have received the Lamar York, Gail Crump, and New Millennium Prizes, have been nominated for Pushcart Prizes, and appear in the anthology New Stories from the Midwest. He is an associate professor of creative writing at Siena Heights University and leads fiction workshops in the United States and Europe.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The City of Saratoga Springs has unveiled a new Smart City plan. Put together in a collaborative process, the plan is designed to advance technology to benefit infrastructure, the business community, visitors and residents.

  Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss Games and role-playing for communication.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources. Jesse, always wonderful to have you join us.

We are also joined by Curt Gervich as an Associate Professor in SUNY Plattsburgh’s enter of Earth and Environmental Science. He teaches courses in Environmental Policy, Sustainability and Environmental Leadership. He also works with EPA and other federal and state agencies across the country on a variety of environmental planning and management challenges

One of his projects is Toxic Release!, an environmental education simulation. Friends of Saranac River Trail is bringing it to Plattsburgh City Hall Community Room on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 5-8 pm. Open to the public with reservations strongly suggested  -  saranacrivertrail.org or northcountryconsulting.com

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Coffee and bagels were provided to students and guests Wednesday morning at the TEC-SMART Campus in Malta, where high schoolers get a jumpstart on a career through the Clean Tech Early College High School program. 

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Sen. Charles Schumer says wireless emergency alerts should include photos — that includes the one sent to millions of New Yorkers last week about a bombing suspect.

  There's a lot of interest in teaching people how to write code. This interest encompasses lots of issues including increasing diversity among coders as well as moving beyond the business-oriented world of coding to other worlds such as arts and sciences. Are coding languages becoming just another way of communicating? We'll talk about those issues.

There are several avenues of exploration and development to talk about, and the diversity and organization (or lack thereof) in the development communities mean that there are lots of choices to make.

And, not to be left out, is this all about sixth-graders? Is there any hope for older folks (including many of the folk who are coding and developing the vast amount of software that we all rely on every day).

And what does it mean when people say that millennials are the first digital native generation?

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us. 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Semiconductor manufacturer GLOBALFOUNDRIES announced that it is working toward the next technological breakthrough of 7 nanometer technology.

  Over the past decade a new and controversial energy extraction method known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has rocketed to the forefront of U.S. energy production. With fracking, millions of gallons of water, dangerous chemicals, and sand are injected under high pressure deep into the earth, fracturing hard rock to release oil and gas.

Wenonah Hauter, one of the nation’s leading public interest advocates, argues that the rush to fracking is dangerous to the environment and treacherous to human health. Frackopoly describes how the fracking industry began; the technologies that make it possible; and the destruction and poisoning of clean water sources and the release of harmful radiation from deep inside shale deposits, creating what the author calls “sacrifice zones” across the American landscape.

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BTV Ignite

Burlington and technology officials announced the city’s first “Innovation Week” to be held in October.  The goal is to highlight the region’s emerging technology “ecosystem.”

  Scott Woolley's new book, The Network: The Battle for the Airwaves and the Birth of the Communications Age is the origin story of the airwaves - the foundational technology of the communications age - as told through the forty-year friendship of an entrepreneurial industrialist and a brilliant inventor.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss augmented and virtual reality. What are they and what is the difference? We will get into that in just a moment.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources.

Paper By Mark Kurlansky

Aug 15, 2016

  Paper is one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past two millennia, the ability to produce it in ever more efficient ways has supported the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art; it has formed the foundation of civilizations, promoting revolutions and restoring stability.

Now, amid discussion of “going paperless”―and as speculation about the effects of a digitally dependent society grows rampant― we’ve come to a world-historic juncture. By tracing paper’s evolution from antiquity to the present, with an emphasis on the contributions made in Asia and the Middle East, Mark Kurlansky challenges common assumptions about technology’s influence, affirming that paper is here to stay.

  Novelist Liz Moore’s latest is The Unseen World , which tells the moving story of a daughter’s quest to discover the truth about her beloved father’s hidden past.

The story begins in a computer science lab in 1980s-era Boston and follows the girl’s quest to figure out her father’s secrets in a virtual universe. 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

If you’re unfamiliar with the world of Pokémon, you may not recognize the names of the virtual monsters being discovered in your neighborhood.

  Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998. He focuses on science, technology, and public health. Since joining the magazine, he has written about agricultural biotechnology, the global AIDS epidemic, avian influenza, malaria, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, synthetic biology, the debate over the meaning of our carbon footprint and new ways to edit DNA.

Specter came to The New Yorker from The New York Times, where he had been a roving foreign correspondent based in Rome. From 1995 to 1998, Specter served as the Times Moscow bureau chief.

Since 2012, Specter has been a Visiting Professor at Bard College, in the department of Environmental and Urban Affairs.

Michael Specter will be at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington tomorow at 7 p.m. His talk is titled: Editing the Human Genome: The Possibilities and Perils. 

  We used to say "seeing is believing"; now googling is believing. With 24/7 access to nearly all of the world's information at our fingertips, we no longer trek to the library or the encyclopedia shelf in search of answers.

While a wealth of literature has been devoted to life with the Internet, The Internet of Us: Knowing More and Understanding Less in the Age of Big Data by Michael Patrick Lynch is the first book to take a look at the deep philosophicalimplications of this seismic shift have not been properly explored until now.

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