technology

  Every year, perhaps even every week, there is some new gadget, device, service, or other digital offering intended to make our lives easier, better, more fun, or more instantaneous–making it that much harder to question how anything digital can be bad for us. Digital has created some wonderful things and we can hardly imagine life without them.

But digital—the most relentless social and economic juggernaut humanity has unleashed in centuries—is also destroying much of what we’ve taken for granted.

In Digital is Destroying Everything, Andrew Edwards takes us on a tour of today’s “blasted heath”, where many things we’ve held dear have been uprooted or entirely changed by digital–and where many new and intriguing flora and fauna are sprouting.

  We live in an age of awesome technological potential. From nanotechnology to synthetic organisms, new technologies stand to revolutionize whole domains of human experience.

One thing these technologies can’t do is answer the profound moral issues they raise. Who should be held accountable when they go wrong?

Wendell Wallach's book, A Dangerous Master forces us to confront the practical - and moral - purposes of our creations.

Rabbi Dan Ornstein: Losing the iPhone, Finding The I

Jul 23, 2015

The Vacation by Wendell Berry

Like any good poem, this one by the poet, Wendell Berry, employs a concrete  metaphor – a man who misses every moment of his vacation because he is too busy recording it – to examine a universal theme: how we absent ourselves from our own lives when we rush through them, disengaged, contracting them out to someone or something else.  Berry uses the word, “move”, with great rhythmic and symbolic effect.  We feel like we are on that speed boat with our vacationer, peering through his video lens at all the beauty which the film captures more accurately than our own minds.  However, for all the movement, there is nothing really moving about the experience:  the man’s camera is a pathetic emotional replacement for the man himself.  Berry also repeats deceptively simple phrases like “have it”, “having it”, “be there”, “would be” and “would not be”.  This turns the poem into a mournful tune about how technological devices are becoming our stand-ins for authentic living.

  After a decade designing technologies meant to address education, health, and global poverty, award-winning computer scientist Kentaro Toyama came to a difficult conclusion: Even in an age of amazing technology, social progress depends on human changes that gadgets can’t deliver.

He writes about it in his book, Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology .

  This morning we will discuss important tech issues with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

This morning we will focus on the idea of non-profits as innovators and we will also welcome Gail Nayowith, an expert in nonprofit organization management.

  Throughout history, there are some events that stand out as so groundbreaking that they completely change life as we know it. The Apollo moon landing of 1969 was one of those events—the invention of the Apple personal computer was another.

Former CEO of both PepsiCo and Apple, John Sculley writes about technology, business, and the future in his book, Moonshot!: Game-Changing Strategies to Build Billion-Dollar Businesses.

  Libraries today are more important than ever. More than just book repositories, libraries can become a defense against some of the most crucial challenges of our age: unequal access to education, jobs, and information.

In BiblioTech, John Palfrey argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online. And libraries, which play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, are at risk.

In order to survive our rapidly modernizing world and dwindling government funding, libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible—by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online.

apple.com

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools. His books include: Swift for Dummies and iOS App Development for Dummies.

He is our tech guru and joins us today to talk about wearable technology.

'Becoming Steve Jobs'

Apr 1, 2015

  There have been many books about Steve Jobs, one of the most famous CEOs in history. But the new book Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs.

The conventional, one-dimensional view of Jobs is that he was half-genius, half-jerk from youth, an irascible and selfish leader who slighted friends and family alike.

Becoming Steve Jobs answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people?

The new book is: Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader by journalists Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli.

Marist, CNR Collaborate On Technology Management

Mar 27, 2015
Courtesy of Marist College

Two colleges in the Hudson Valley are teaming up for technology. One college is a leader in cloud computing and is offering its services to another campus two counties to the south. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne has more on the new hookup.

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