Best known as Ari Gold, the agent you love to hate on HBO's Entourage, Emmy and Golden Globe winner Jeremy Piven has one of Hollywood's coolest and most diverse resumes.

Piven surprised audiences by taking on the title role in the British series, Mr. Selfridge which is about the real-life department store's mogul which airs on Masterpiece on PBS and has its 3rd season premiere this Sunday, March 29th.

  On June 29, 1978, Bob Crane, known to Hogan's Heroes fans as Colonel Hogan, was discovered brutally murdered in his Scottsdale, Arizona apartment. His eldest son, Robert Crane, was called to the crime scene. In his new memoir, Crane discusses that terrible day and how he has lived with the unsolved murder of his father.

But this storyline is just one thread in his tale of growing up in Los Angeles, his struggles to reconcile the good and sordid sides of his celebrity father, and his own fascinating life.

As a result of a raucous encounter with the cast of Canada's SCTV, he found himself shelving his notepad and tape recorder to enter the employ of John Candy -- first as an on-again, off-again publicist; then as a full-time assistant, confidant, screenwriter, and producer; and finally as one of Candy's pallbearers.

His new book is: Crane: Sex, Celebrity, and My Father's Unsolved Murder.

  From her debut recital at Carnegie Recital Hall to the Broadway pits of Les Miserables and Miss Saigon, oboist Blair Tindall has played with some of the biggest names in classical music for twenty-five years. She was the principal oboe in the Hudson Valley Philharmonic, based in Poughkeepsie, for 13 years.

In her memoir, Mozart in the Jungle, Tindall exposes the scandalous rock and roll lifestyles of the musicians, conductors, and administrators who inhabit the insular world of classical music.

The 2005 book shook things up and the book became an Amazon Instant Video series about love, ambition and jealousy backstage at the symphony.

  Does acting matter?

David Thomson, one of our most respected and insightful writers on movies and theater, answers this question in his essay, Why Acting Matters.

Thomson tackles this most elusive of subjects, examining the allure of the performing arts for both the artist and the audience member while addressing the paradoxes inherent in acting itself. He reflects on the casting process, on stage versus film acting, and on the cult of celebrity.

  In his new memoir, I Must Say: My Life As a Humble Comedy Legend ,Martin Short tells the tale of how a showbiz-obsessed kid from Canada transformed himself into one of Hollywood’s favorite funnymen, known to his famous peers as the “comedian’s comedian.”

Martin Short talks about his early years in Toronto as a member of the improvisational troupe Second City to the all-American comic big time of Saturday Night Live and memorable roles in movies such as ¡Three Amigos! and Father of the Bride.

  For twenty-five years and counting, Rebecca Eaton has presided over PBS’s Masterpiece, the longest running weekly prime time drama series on American television. Eaton brings to her new memoir, Making Masterpiece, the voices of many of the writers, directors, producers, and other contributors and shares personal anecdotes about her decades-spanning career.

    Obsessively watched and critically ignored, sitcoms were a distraction, a gentle lullaby of a kinder, gentler America—until suddenly the artificial boundary between the world and television entertainment collapsed.

In Sitcom: A History In 24 Episodes From I Love Lucy To Community by Saul Austerlitz, we can watch the growth of the sitcom, following the path that leads from Lucy to The Phil Silvers Show; from The Dick Van Dyke Show to The Mary Tyler Moore Show; from M*A*S*H to Taxi; from Cheers to Roseanne; from Seinfeld to Curb Your Enthusiasm; and from The Larry Sanders Show to 30 Rock.

TV comedic actor Phil Hartman is best known for his eight brilliant seasons on Saturday Night Live, where his versatility and comedic timing resulted in some of the funniest and most famous sketches in the television show’s history.

  Ron Nyswaner’s writing and producing career has taken him through the major shifts in the film and television industry, from independent films to breakthrough Hollywood dramas (Philadelphia), award winning television movies and, most recently, a hit cable series (Ray Donovan).

He'll be at the Woodstock Film Festival for a panel discussion entitled "Long and Short Stories A Conversation with Ron Nyswaner" - hosted by Us Weekly editor Bradley Jacobs.

    The Mahaiwe 2014 Gala on October 12th will honor Jane Iredale and feature a performance by Broadway legend Bernadette Peters.

Star of stage and screen, Peters is likely best known for her film roles in The Jerk and Pennies from Heaven and from the stage for her Tony nominated performances in Sunday in the Park with George, Gypsy, and Follies - and her Tony Award winning turns in Annie Get Your Gun and Song and Dance. She received the 2012 Isabelle Stevenson Award for her work with her charity, Broadway Barks which she co-founded in 1999 with Mary Tyler Moore.