terrorism

  Daniel Shapiro, Ph.D., is founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program and a world-renowned expert on conflict resolution. From advising leaders of war-torn countries to working with senior executives and families in crisis, Dan has helped thousands of organizations and individuals solve the problems that divide us. Drawing on these experiences and his practice-based research, he has developed a wealth of practical approaches to amplify influence and leadership—in business, in government, and in life.

His new book is Negotiating the Nonnegotiable: How to Resolve Your Most Emotionally Charged Conflicts.

In the wake of the recent terrorist attacks in Belgium, the presidential candidates have not hesitated to offer their views on how to eliminate terrorist attacks. To become better informed on the candidates’ stances, recently I read an article in the New York Times, listened to General Hayden, the former NSA head, on NPR (I know some readers have now already disqualified me as a liberal), and read Karl Rove’s story in the Wall Street Journal. Talk about fair and balanced.

In a still unpublished manuscript on the way conservative economics has failed us, my friend Eric Zuesse remarked, “The ‘Greek debt’ is really not a debt of the Greek people.” He goes on to identify the “institutional creditors  … Euro-banks … high risk kleptocrats, oligarchs and bankers who siphoned most of the euros into overseas Swiss accounts …. [and other foreign investments] devoid of any capacity to generate income to pay back the debt.”

  The EOD—explosive ordnance disposal—community is tight-knit, and when one of their own is hurt, an alarm goes out. When Brian Castner, an Iraq War vet, learns that his friend and EOD brother Matt has been killed by an IED in Afghanistan, he goes to console Matt's widow, but he also begins a personal investigation. Is the bomb maker who killed Matt the same man American forces have been hunting since Iraq, known as the Engineer?

In this All the Ways We Kill and Die: An Elegy for a Fallen Comrade, and the Hunt for His Killer, Castner takes us inside the manhunt for this elusive figure, meeting maimed survivors, interviewing the forensics teams who gather post-blast evidence, the wonks who collect intelligence, the drone pilots and contractors tasked to kill. His investigation reveals how warfare has changed since Iraq, becoming individualized even as it has become hi-tech, with our drones, bomb disposal robots, and CSI-like techniques.

  How did American intelligence respond to terrorism, a major war and the most sweeping technological revolution in the last 500 years? Why did NSA begin the controversial terrorist surveillance program that included the acquisition of domestic phone records?

General Michael Hadyen, the only person ever to helm both CIA and NSA, offers an insider's look at America’s intelligence wars in his new book, Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror.

For ten years, Hayden participated in every major event in American national security, the fallout and consequences of which are still unfolding today.

  It was the deadliest terror campaign ever mounted against a nation in modern times: the al-Aqsa, or Second, Intifada. This is the untold story of how Israel fought back with an elite force of undercover operatives, drawn from the nation’s diverse backgrounds and ethnicities—and united in their ability to walk among the enemy as no one else dared.

President Obama commented a few weeks ago that Muslims in America must do more to stop Muslim violence and many have suggested that the Muslim community has not been doing enough to stop it.(1 ) That struck me as very false, given my own contacts in the Muslim community. So I reached out to learn what is happening in the Muslim community.

wikipedia.org

A western New York bar owner who says his restaurant was the one identified by authorities as the target of a would-be terrorist says the man arrested in the plot is "an aggressive panhandler."

Herbert London: Perversion Of Islam?

Dec 30, 2015

In what can only be described as a “reassurance” speech is, President Obama in addressing the terrorist murders in San Bernardino, California said we should not be overcome by fear. Once again, he noted this terror is not a reflection of Islam. His Attorney General, Loretta Lynch, went further in contending that the real fear is anti Islamic prejudice, even though there is little evidence to support her concern.

 Pulitzer Prize winning Washington Post reporter Joby Warrick and author of The Triple Agent has a new book, Black Flags: The Rise of Isis. Which is a dramatic account explaining how the strain of militant Islam behind the Islamic State first arose in a remote a Jordanian prison and spread with the unwitting aid of two American Presidents. 

The latest Siena College poll finds that most people agree with the corruption conviction of the state’s former longtime Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, who was found guilty on seven counts two weeks ago.

Bill Owens: A Rational Approach To ISIS

Dec 8, 2015

In the aftermath of the attacks in Paris, Beirut (receiving virtually no media coverage), and now San Bernardino, California terrorism is in our consciousness. The immediate reaction from almost all of us is one of revulsion and anger.

New York Democratic Congresswoman Nita Lowey is calling on the House to pass legislation prohibiting suspects on the terror watch list from purchasing firearms.

I am disgusted both by the rhetoric against Syrian refugees and the apparent support the rhetoric is garnering in polling data.  Listen to the following statements from some prominent politicians – some of whom want to be the next President of the United States.

Keith Strudler: The New Stadium Reality

Nov 18, 2015

For anyone working for a sports team or league or college athletic department, last Friday in Paris wasn’t simply horrifying. It was an uncomfortable reality, one that would forever impact your daily work life long after the Parisian chaos subsided. See, if you ask someone in the sports world about their worst fear, it’s not a losing season, or a bad trade, or even a critical injury to a star athlete. These things happen all the time, and while burdensome, are simply the cost of doing business.

  In his new book of investigative reporting, Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyber-attack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared.

Ted Koppel is a 42-year veteran of ABC News and was anchor and managing editor of Nightline from 1980 to 2005. 

Women Against War is hosting news consultant, law professor and author Marjorie Cohn this weekend for presentations on Drones and Targeted Killing: Legal Moral and Political Issues.

Marjorie teaches at the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, lectures globally on international human rights and US foreign policy and has done work on the complex issue of military drones. She has been a news consultant for CBS News and a legal analyst for Court TV, and has also provided legal and political commentary on BBC, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, NPR, and Pacifica Radio.

She has testified before Congress and at military trials. She is deputy secretary general of the International Association of Democratic Lawyers. She is a former president of the National Lawyers’ Guild and she joins us this morning.

  In his new book of investigative reporting, Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyber-attack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared.

It isn’t just a scenario. Koppel says a well-designed attack on just one of the nation’s three electric power grids could cripple much of our infrastructure—and in the age of cyber-warfare, a laptop has become the only necessary weapon.

 Scott Shane is a national security reporter for The New York Times, based in Washington DC where he has worked for more than a decade. His new book is, Objective Troy: A Terrorist, A President, And The Rise Of The Drone. The book tells the story of Anwar al-Awlaki, the once celebrated American imam who called for moderation  after 9/11, but ultimately directed his talents to the mass murder of his fellow citizens. 

  September 11th marks the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks when four passenger airliners were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists - charged with the mission of flying them into buildings on U.S. soil.

In his new book, Base Nation, author David Vine examines how the existence of U.S. bases abroad, particularly in Saudi Arabia, were part of Osama bin Laden’s professed motivation for the 9/11 attacks.

Furthermore, Vine looks to demonstrate that America’s sprawling network of overseas bases imposes costs— not only financial but also political, environmental, and moral— that far exceed what the Pentagon is prepared to acknowledge. David Vine is an associate professor of anthropology at American University in Washington, D.C.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

Police say an upstate New York man has been arrested and is accused of making threats against employees at two federal agencies.

Department of Justice

A 23-year-old Adams, Massachusetts man and son of a Boston police captain has been arrested after he obtained guns to kill innocent people in support of the so-called Islamic State, according to federal authorities.

  On April 15, 2013, two homemade bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston marathon, killing three people and wounding more than 264 others. In the ensuing manhunt, Tamerlan Tsarnaev died, and his younger brother, Dzhokhar, was captured and ultimately charged on thirty federal counts.

Yet long after the bombings and the terror they sowed, after all the testimony and debate, what we still haven’t learned is why. Why did the American Dream go so wrong for two immigrants? How did such a nightmare come to pass?

Acclaimed Russian-American journalist Masha Gessen is uniquely endowed with the background, access, and talents to tell the full story.

4/15/15 Panel

Apr 15, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Cuba off terrorism list; Congress allowed in on Iran; Atlanta educators sentenced; Retiree savings changes; EU Google anti-trust.

4/10/15 Panel

Apr 10, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Scheduled topics include: Cuba may be removed from terror list; Iran nuclear deal; new video released in SC shooting.

wikipedia

An upstate New York man accused of helping build an X-ray device he thought would be used to kill people at a mosque and an Islamic center has asked the judge to dismiss charges, saying the entire scheme was concocted by undercover investigators.

Glendon Scott Crawford says in court papers that evidence turned over by federal prosecutors shows that from 2012 until his 2013 arrest, 59 federal and state agents worked on the case and that "no criminal enterprise existed," except as they fabricated it.

Herbert London: Self Censorship And The First Amendment

Jan 14, 2015

  Rising from the ugly portals of dictatorship and control, is the irrevocable value of open expression. Free speech, indeed the ability to make decisions for yourself, is a gift bequeathed to citizens residing with Western traditions. At times speech is hateful and tasteless – an unappetizing features of freedom. But this is a price willingly paid to assure free exchange.

  What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to “Remember El-Sayyid Nosair.”

For Zak Ebrahim, a childhood amongst terrorism was all he knew. After his father’s incarceration, his family moved often, and as the perpetual new kid in class, he faced constant teasing and exclusion. Yet, though his radicalized father and uncles modeled fanatical beliefs, to Ebrahim something never felt right. His story is told in The Terrorist's Son: A Story of Choice.

9/26/14 Panel

Sep 26, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao. WAMC New Director, Ian Pickus also joins for part of today's conversation.

Topics include:
Eric Holder
Subway terror plot?
FBI director blasts Apple, Google for locking police out of phones
Derek Jeter
Property tax cap upheld

MTA

New York's top government officials have taken to the nation's largest subway system following the disclosure of an alleged terrorist attack on trains in U.S. cities.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman Tom Prendergast rode a train from the World Trade Center to Penn Station in Manhattan Thursday afternoon.

Cuomo said there was no specific, credible threat to New York City subways.

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