theater

Audrey Kupferberg: Salt Of The Earth

Aug 21, 2015


These days, documentary films are in fashion.  As recently as a decade ago, if you were at a cocktail party and began talking about a documentary you had just seen, your friends or colleagues would have moved towards the buffet table to avoid hearing what you had to say.  Documentaries were considered boring.  With the exception the films of Michael Moore, or Al Gore’s AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH, that could inspire some exciting political conversation, the majority of factual films took a back seat to fiction films.

The bewildering journey of finding love in the modern world sets the premise for Terrence McNally’s bittersweet comedy, Frankie And Johnny In the Clair de Lune. The show is running on the Berkshire Theatre Group’s Fitzpatrick Mainstage in Stockbridge, MA through August 22nd.

After a one-night rendezvous in Manhattan's West Side, Johnny, a compulsive, starry-eyed, short-order cook, is convinced he has found his life companion in Frankie, a wisecracking waitress.

Frankie’s poor history with men leaves her hesitant to commit, but as the night progresses, she lets her guard down and an unlikely romance begins to blossom.

The contemporary love story stars Angel Desai and Darren Pettie and is directed by Karen Allen.

This past April, Capital Rep announced the winners of its inaugural Young Playwright Contest and the five winning plays are being produced this week and through the weekend.

From costumes to props and sets all designed and built by the REP’s staff, these productions are giving young peoples’ voices a chance to be heard. The plays are directed by Margaret Hall, theREP’s assistant to the artistic director, and performed by theREP’s new Summer Stage Young Acting Company.

Director Margaret Hall and student playwright Jaimie Gaskell join us to discuss how art and community is being fostered and grown.

Gaskell is a tenth grade student at Greenwich Jr./Sr. High School. Her play, Y.A.P.’s Homeless Youth Hostel, takes us into a residence where protagonists from Young Adult novels await the arrival of their prophecy from the United States Post Office.

Herbert Wolff Reviews "Mother Of The Maid"

Aug 13, 2015

The story of Joan of Arc has evoked mythology and themes for centuries, and has inspired numerous playwrights – including Shakespeare, Voltaire, Bertolt Brecht, George Bernard Shaw, and Maxwell Anderson – to craft interpretations of the legends that surround the Maid of Orlean.

  Tony winner Mary Louise Wilson -- forever dubbed "the best thing in it" in review after review – has written a memoir about her life in the theatre, movies and television. My First Hundred Years in Show Business tells Wilson’s story through the eight-year journey of turning a memoir of Vogue editor Diana Vreeland into the career-peak triumph Full Gallop, the show that made Wilson a star in her 60s.

Mary Louise Wilson's numerous award-winning roles include Vera Joseph in 4000 Miles at Lincoln Center, Big Edie in Grey Gardens (Tony Award), Fraulein Schneider in Cabaret (Tony nomination), Queen Elizabeth in The Beard of Avon (Drama Desk nomination) and Diana Vreeland in Full Gallop (Drama Desk Award). Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times, and she teaches acting at Tulane University. She is fresh from finishing a run on stage in the hit revival of On The Twentieth Century.

This Book Show was recorded at The Morton Memorial Library in Rhinecliff, NY, presented by Oblong Books and Music.

  Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival is presenting an adaptation of Homer’s epic An Iliad for one actor that is making the rounds in the Valley this August.

HVSF's first solo show stars Kurt Rhoads as the ageless Poet who unleashes the fury of an ancient story he has told for centuries - creating heroes and battles before our eyes, challenging us to contemplate both the heroism and horror of war.

The New York Times said this OBIE Award-winning play is "spellbinding...an age-old story that resonates with tragic meaning today."

The show is directed by Gaye Taylor Upchurch and features longtime HVSF actor Kurt Rhoads.

The show will be performed at Basilica Hudson on 8/16, on Bannerman Island on 8/22 and 8/23, and at the HVSF tent at Boscobel House and Gardens on 8/21 and 8/24.

  The final mainstage production of this summer’s Williamstown Theatre Festival line-up began previews last night. Artistic Director Mandy Greenfield’s inaugural season ends with Eugene O’Neill’s final masterpiece, A Moon for the Misbegotten. The show will run in Williamstown through August 23rd.

Gordon Edelstein, Artistic Director at the Long Warf Theatre in New Haven, is directing and brings years of O’Neill experience to this invigorating look at what he calls “one of the great sad love stories in modern dramatic literature.”

A Moon for the Misbegotten stars Audra McDonald as Josie Hogan and Will Swenson as James Tyrone Jr. Married couple McDonald and Swenson are two of the best and most in-demand actors working today. Swenson recently left the Broadway revival of Les Miserables after playing Javert for more than a year, other New York credits include Murder Ballad, Little Miss Sunshine, Priscilla Queen of the Desert, and the acclaimed Public Theater production of Hair which ran off-broadway, moved to Broadway for a summer of love, and toured the country. Will was nominated for a Tony Award for his portrayal of Berger. He is also a film director.

Audra McDonald has won a record 6 Tony Awards - one for her work in each of the following: Carousel, Master Class, Ragtime, A Raisin in the Sun, Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, and Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill. She is the only person to have won one in each acting category. She’s also a television and film actress, featured in the new Meryl Streep movie, Ricki and the Flash, written by Diablo Cody and directed by Jonathan Demme.

  The world Premiere of Mother of the Maid is now playing at Shakespeare & Company’s Bernstein Theatre through September 6th.

Penned by the Emmy award-winning writer of HBO’s Olive Kitteridge, Jane Anderson, this powerful and wry comedy follows the tale of Joan of Arc, as seen through the eyes of her mum who is doing her very best to accept the fact that her daughter is different.

Parenthood, religion, sexuality and politics all play a role. Tina Packer stars as the Mother of the Maid. We are joined now by the writer Jane Anderson and director Matthew Penn.

Shervin Lainez

  Duncan Sheik and Kyle Jarrow’s new musical, Noir, is the final Martel Musical of New York Stage and Film and Vassar College’s Powerhouse Theater season. Sheik and Jarrow previously worked together on the musical Whisper House.

Noir tells the tale of a heartbroken man in LA who discovers and involves himself in a mystery unfolding just beyond his paper-thin walls.

Duncan Sheik joins us to talk about Noir; the Deaf West Theatre production of Spring Awakening (his Tony Award winning show penned with Steven Sater) coming to Broadway in the fall and about his musical version of American Psycho (with book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa) which comes to Broadway early in 2016.

  At their childhood home after their mother’s funeral, Nate gets high and Jeremy focusses on work waiting for him in the city -- both brothers trying to send their minds anywhere but where they are.

This is the starting point of A Little More Alive - a Musical Theatre Lab production currently running on Barrington Stage Company’s St. Germain Stage in Pittsfield, MA through August 8th.

The musical, directed by Sheryl Kaller and featuring actors Van Hughes, Daniel Jenkins, Nicolette Robinson, Michael Tacconi, and Emily Walton, tells the story of dealing not only with the devastation of loss but the revelation that the person who has died had a secret. A secret that warps all of their memories of her and both monumental and mundane moment in their lives.

Nick Blaemire wrote the show - book, music, and lyrics. We speak with him here about the process.

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