theater

  Julius Caesar, a beautiful and popular girl from a wealthy family has been selected as the ‘face’ of Rome Preparatory Academy, an elite all girls boarding school. She will be the president of the student council and represent the school at both fund raising and social events, including Homecoming, over which she will preside as queen. Although well liked, Caesar's sense of entitlement and hubris are resented by other students. ---- If that sounds familiar but some the details seem new – you’re keeping up with us just fine.

The Theatre Department at SUNY New Paltz is staging a production of William Shakepeare’s Julius Caesar set in a girls’ boarding school.

This re-imagining of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar asks the audience to consider violence on a more personal level by eliminating the safe distance of history and putting the weapons in the hands of young people.

The new play Holy Laughter follows an Episcopal priest who finds that the reality of leading a church is radically and hilariously different than what she learned in seminary. As she wrestles with church finances, eccentric parishioners, changing sexual mores and her own doubting human heart, Abigail struggles to make peace with the realities of contemporary church life.

WAM did a reading of Catherine Trieschmann’s play How the World Began as part of the inaugural 2014 Fresh Takes series, and it was very well received. Earlier this year, WAM Artistic Director Kristen van Ginhoven saw the first staged reading of her new play Holy Laughter at the Denver Center New Play Summit, where it had been commissioned.

Catherine Trieschmann’s plays include The Bridegroom of Blowing Rock, Crooked, How the World Began, Hot Georgia Sunday, and The Most Deserving. We welcome her to The Roundtable this morning along with Kristen van Ginhoven, Artistic Director of WAM Theatre.

  John Lahr is an acclaimed theater critic. Since 1992 he’s been the Senior Drama Critic for The New Yorker magazine.

He’s the author of such books as Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh, and the brand new, Joy Ride. The book is a collection of Lahr’s New Yorker profiles and reviews which explore the lives of the theatricals.

  For years, theater director Bryan Doerries has led an innovative public health project that produces ancient tragedies for current and returned soldiers, addicts, tornado and hurricane survivors, and a wide range of other at-risk people in society.

Drawing on these extraordinary firsthand experiences, Doerries clearly and powerfully illustrates the redemptive and therapeutic potential of this classical, timeless art: how, for example, Ajax can help soldiers and their loved ones better understand and grapple with PTSD, or how Prometheus Bound provides new insights into the modern penal system. These plays are revivified not just in how Doerries applies them to communal problems of today, but in the way he translates them himself from the ancient Greek, deftly and expertly rendering enduring truths in contemporary and striking English.

  The 5th annual Made in the Berkshires Festival will take place at Berkshire Theatre Group venues this weekend – October 23rd through the 25th.

The festival features cutting-edge theatrical works (performed as staged readings), live music, film, short stories, and dance.

The co-curators of Made in the Berkshires are Hilary Deely and Barbara Sims.

  Warrior Productions in Rhinebeck was founded with a couple key goals. They want promote new works by emerging and established playwrights living in the Hudson Valley, to present artists with production opportunities and unique programs seldom found elsewhere and to create and provide programs in which emerging artists collaborate with accomplished mentors in a supportive, educational, and professional environment.

They also are looking to produce diverse and provocative new plays that explore contemporary issues and engage audiences and communities.

Elaine Fernandez is President and Founder of Warrior Productions.

  The Cocoon Theatre’s Beckett Festival will take place in Poughkeepsie, NY October 16 - 25 and will include a production of Samuel Beckett’s "Happy Days" and two public symposia - "Why Beckett? Why Now?" on October 18 and a student symposium "Why Study the Arts?" on October 25.

Beckett scholar, David Tucker, will participate in the "Why Beckett? Why Now?" Symposium. He is a Research Fellow at the University of Chester where he has been working on a performance history project on Beckett and British drama.

Adirondack Shakespeare Company

The Adirondack Shakespeare Company is moving forward with two shows after a car accident injured four of its players a week before opening night. The group that is pushing on through tears with laughter shared their story with WAMC's Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard.

  In 2008, Brian Selznick’s groundbreaking book The Invention of Hugo Cabret was awarded the Caldecott Medal. It was nominated for a National Book Award and was the basis for Martin Scorsese's Oscar winning film Hugo.

His follow up illustrated novel, Wonderstruck, debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. His newest illustrated novel is The Marvels where two seemingly unrelated stories - one in words, the other in pictures - come together. 

'4000 Miles' At TheRep

Sep 29, 2015
capitalrep.org

  Seeking solace at the end of his cross-country bike trip, 21-year old Leo arrives unannounced at the Greenwich Village apartment of his 91-year old Jewish grandmother, Vera.

Instead, he gets a big life lesson from his former outspoken, activist grandma. Over the course of a single month, these two outsiders infuriate, bewilder, and ultimately change one another forever.

Amy Herzog’s dramatic comedy, 4000 Miles, received the Obie Award for Best Play, was a finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and was named #1 Play of the Year by Time Magazine.

A production of 4000 Miles is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in downtown Albany, NY. We are joined by actors Eileen Schuyler and Miles Jackson.

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