theater

Joan Marcus / AP

  The Audience is a play written by Peter Morgan, directed by Stephen Daldry, and starring Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth the II. It opened in the West End in 2013 earning Olivier Awards for Mirren and one of her co-stars, Richard McCabe. McCabe portrays Harold Wilson who was a British Labour Party politician and served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1964 to 1970 and 1974 to 1976.

In The Audience, Peter Morgan has written imagined conversations between the Queen and her Prime Ministers during their weekly private meetings in Buckingham Palace. The play floats from year to year and decade to decade making use of theatre and costume quick-change magic and, of course, the skill of tremendous performers.

The Audience, now running on Broadway through June 28, is nominated for three Tony Awards - one for Dame Mirren, one for Bob Crowley for his costume design, and one for our guest, Richard McCabe.

Joan Marcus

  Airline Highway, by Lisa D’Amour, is an ode to the outcasts that make life a little more interesting. In the parking lot of The Hummingbird, a once-glamorous motel on New Orleans’ infamous Airline Highway, a group of friends gather. A rag-tag collection of strippers, hustlers and philosophers have come together to celebrate the life of Miss Ruby, an iconic burlesque performer who has requested a funeral before she dies.

Directed by Joe Mantello, Manhattan Theatre Club’s presentation of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s production of Airline Highway is running at the Samuel J. Friedman theatre in New York City through June 7th.

The play co-stars K. Todd Freeman as Sissy Nana. Freeman has been a member of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago since 1993. The Obie Award winning theatre, television, and film actor has earned a Tony Award nomination - his second - for Best Performance for an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play for his performance.

  

    An American in Paris is a new stage musical based on the 1951 film of the same name -- the film, directed by Vincente Minnelli and starring Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron, was itself inspired by a 1928 orchestral composition by George Gershwin.

The new musical, set in the City of Lights just after World War II, features classic songs by George and Ira Gershwin including “I Got Rhythm,” “‘S Wonderful,” “But Not for Me,” and “They Can’t Take That Away,” and orchestral music from George Gershwin including “Concerto in F,” and “An American in Paris.” The show is currently running at The Palace Theatre on Broadway and is nominated for 12 Tony Awards including Best Musical.

  

  Based in Glens Falls, NY, the Adirondack Theatre Festival strives to challenge, entertain, and nourish its audience through the development and production of new and contemporary musicals and plays -- since its first season in 1995, ATF has produced 19 world premieres.

This summer productions include Kalamazoo, The Uncivil War, Spun: A Brother/Sister Rock Musical, a Backstage Series reading of The Banana Tree by Dan Castellaneta & Deb Lacusta – and more!

Here to tell us all about it is ATF’s new Producing Artistic Director – Chad Rabinovitz.

Bob Goepfert Reviews "Dinner With Friends"

Apr 18, 2015

"Dinner With Friends," playing at Curtain Call Theatre in Latham through May 9, is a richly textured play filled with insights on human nature. It also has wise observations on the complicated dynamic of relationships.

  Spring Awakening is a rock musical with music by Duncan Sheik and a book and lyrics by Steven Sater. It is based on the 1891 German play Spring Awakening by Frank Wedekind. Set in late-19th century Germany, the musical tells the story of teenagers discovering the inner and outer tumult of sexuality and struggling with repression, rejection and lack of information.

Spring Awakening won Best Musical and several other Tony Awards for its original Broadway run. The Theatre Institute at Sage will present a production of the musical this weekend and next at the James L. Meader Little Theater in Troy, NY.

The production’s director, Leigh Strimbeck, joins us now along with Austin Lombardi, Junior Theater Major, who plays Moritz in the show and Kaleigh Cerqua, Senior Theater Major who is the assistant director.

  Tina Packer is one of the world's leading authorities on Shakespeare's work and the Founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA.

She'll be delivering the 19th Annual Burian Lecture on April 13th at SUNY Albany, sponsored by the Department of Theatre and co-sponsored by the NYS Writers Institute. In the lecture she'll discuss her new book, Women of Will: The Feminine in Shakespeare’s Plays

Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times

  James Lecesne has been telling stories for over 25 years. His short film, Trevor, won the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short in 1995 and went on to inspire the founding of The Trevor Project, the only nationwide 24-hour suicide prevention helpline for LGBT and, Questioning youth. He is also the founder of The After The Storm Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to offering support to community centers in New Orleans that are working with youth and the arts.

On Sunday, April 12th he will bring his one-man show The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey to the stage of Club Helsinki in Hudson, NY as part of their Helsinki on Broadway series presented in association with Showstoppers New York.

  Can You Hear Me Baby? Stories of Sex, Love, and OMG Birth! is being presented as a staged reading with music on March 27th and 28th at Berkshire Theatre Group's Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge, MA as a benefit for the National Perinatal Association, Berkshire Festival of Women Writers and WAM Theatre.

Written by Lisa Rafel, with music by Lisa Rafel and Gary Malkin, Can You Hear Me Baby? brings together birth stories and original music to dramatize the joy, challenges, personal courage and profundity of birth.

Here to tell us more are playwright Lisa Rafel and the production’s director/producer Jayne Atkinson.

JOAN MARCUS

  Jim Dale started his professional career as a seventeen year old comedian playing the Music Halls of Britain. A little down the road he became a pop singing star during the early days of rock and roll and appeared in fourteen of the legendary Carry On films for the British cinema.

At the request of Laurence Olivier he joined the British National Theatre. He starred in the first Musical by Cameron Mackintosh, The Card, and played Fagin in Oliver! at the London Palladium. He first appeared on the American stage in 1973 - in 1980 he won the Tony Award for his work in Barnum.

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