theater

  Tina Packer is one of the world's leading authorities on Shakespeare's work and the Founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA.

She'll be delivering the 19th Annual Burian Lecture on April 13th at SUNY Albany, sponsored by the Department of Theatre and co-sponsored by the NYS Writers Institute. In the lecture she'll discuss her new book, Women of Will: The Feminine in Shakespeare’s Plays

Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times

  James Lecesne has been telling stories for over 25 years. His short film, Trevor, won the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short in 1995 and went on to inspire the founding of The Trevor Project, the only nationwide 24-hour suicide prevention helpline for LGBT and, Questioning youth. He is also the founder of The After The Storm Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to offering support to community centers in New Orleans that are working with youth and the arts.

On Sunday, April 12th he will bring his one-man show The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey to the stage of Club Helsinki in Hudson, NY as part of their Helsinki on Broadway series presented in association with Showstoppers New York.

  Can You Hear Me Baby? Stories of Sex, Love, and OMG Birth! is being presented as a staged reading with music on March 27th and 28th at Berkshire Theatre Group's Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge, MA as a benefit for the National Perinatal Association, Berkshire Festival of Women Writers and WAM Theatre.

Written by Lisa Rafel, with music by Lisa Rafel and Gary Malkin, Can You Hear Me Baby? brings together birth stories and original music to dramatize the joy, challenges, personal courage and profundity of birth.

Here to tell us more are playwright Lisa Rafel and the production’s director/producer Jayne Atkinson.

JOAN MARCUS

  Jim Dale started his professional career as a seventeen year old comedian playing the Music Halls of Britain. A little down the road he became a pop singing star during the early days of rock and roll and appeared in fourteen of the legendary Carry On films for the British cinema.

At the request of Laurence Olivier he joined the British National Theatre. He starred in the first Musical by Cameron Mackintosh, The Card, and played Fagin in Oliver! at the London Palladium. He first appeared on the American stage in 1973 - in 1980 he won the Tony Award for his work in Barnum.

'Souvenir' At TheRep

Mar 11, 2015

  At the turn of the last century, Florence Foster Jenkins was a New York phenomenon where she rose to fame for her annual sold-out recitals at the Ritz Carlton and Carnegie Hall. Crowds went wild when Mrs. Jenkins tackled the most difficult arias in opera, festooned in fabulous costumes.

The only trouble was: Mrs. Jenkins could not sing. Not a note. Still, Florence, a YouTube sensation far ahead of her time, could not be deterred from her dedication to music and voice lessons with her accomplished and compassionate accompanist, Cosme McMoon.

Souvenir is a play by Stephen Temperley about Florence Foster Jenkins and Cosme McMoon. It is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in Albany, NY. The production is directed by CapRep’s Producing Artistic Director, Maggie Mancinelli-Cahill.

Jonas Cohen plays afore mentioned “compassionate accompanist,” Cosme McMoon and he joins us to discuss the play.

JOAN MARCUS

  The classic American musical, Annie, is at Proctors in Schenectady this week in a touring production which chooses to eschew recent adaptations and modifications to spin back to the pure fun of the original Broadway production.

Opening last night, the new tour is staged by Annie’s original lyricist-director Martin Charnin. Featuring book and score by Charnin and Tony Award®-winners Thomas Meehan, and Charles Strouse. Annie includes - as if we needed to tell you - such unforgettable songs as "Easy Street," "I Don't Need Anything But You," and "Tomorrow."

And what would Annie’s story be without her ultimately-adoptive father - Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks? In this touring company, Daddy Warbucks is played by Gilgamesh Taggett.

  Does acting matter?

David Thomson, one of our most respected and insightful writers on movies and theater, answers this question in his essay, Why Acting Matters.

Thomson tackles this most elusive of subjects, examining the allure of the performing arts for both the artist and the audience member while addressing the paradoxes inherent in acting itself. He reflects on the casting process, on stage versus film acting, and on the cult of celebrity.

Metroland 2/12/15

Feb 12, 2015

  Shawn Stone, the Arts Editor of Metroland, lets us know what is coming to area stages and screens this week.

Tom Killips

  Becca and Howie Corbett have everything a family could want, until a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down and leaves the couple drifting perilously apart.

The play, Rabbit Hole, by David Lindsay Abaire, charts Becca and Howie’s bittersweet search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day.

Rabbit Hole won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and a production of the play opens this Friday night produced by the Schenectady Civic Players.

Amy Lane plays Becca and she joins us now.

    

  It all begins when sweet Nan and her out-of-work webmaster hubby, Steve, realize they can't afford to keep up the extravagant gift giving that has become their family's tradition. In an effort to make everyone happy, they announce that they have made a gift to a charity in everyone's name. Except it's a fictitious charity. No problem — until the website that Steve creates to seal the deal becomes prey to cyberspace hijinks, with deliciously funny and unpredictable results.

This is the plot of the play How Water Behaves by Sherry Kramer – the world premiere of which is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in Albany, NY. The show is directed by acclaimed theatre director Gordon Greenberg and co-stars Nisi Sturgis as Nan and Michael McCorry Rose as Hank.

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