Theodore Roosevelt

In The Wars of the Roosevelts: The Ruthless Rise of America's Greatest Political Family, William J. Mann presents a modern revisionist biographical history of one of America’s greatest and most influential families—the Roosevelts—exposing heretofore unknown family secrets and detailing complex family rivalries with his signature cinematic flair.

  More than a century has passed since Theodore Roosevelt was in the White House, but he still continues to fascinate. Never has a more exuberant man been our nation's leader. He became a war hero, reformed the NYPD, busted the largest railroad and oil trusts, passed the Pure Food and Drug Act, created national parks and forests, won the Nobel Peace Prize, and built the Panama Canal―to name just a few.

Yet it was the cause he championed the hardest―America's entry in to WWI―that would ultimately divide and destroy him. His youngest son, Quentin, his favorite, would die in an air fight. How does looking at Theodore's relationship with his son, and understanding him as a father, tell us something new about this larger-than-life-man?

Eric Burns explores the story and relationship in his book, The Golden Lad: The Haunting Story of Quentin and Theodore Roosevelt.

  In August 1906, black soldiers stationed in Brownsville, Texas, were accused of going on a lawless rampage in which shots were fired, one man was killed, and another wounded. Because the perpetrators could never be positively identified, President Theodore Roosevelt took the highly unusual step of discharging without honor all one hundred sixty-seven members of the black battalion on duty the night of the shooting.

Taking on Theodore Roosevelt: How One Senator Defied the President on Brownsville and Shook American Politics by Harry Lembeck investigates the controversial action of an otherwise much-lauded president, the challenge to his decision from a senator of his own party, and the way in which Roosevelt’s uncompromising stance affected African American support of the party of Lincoln.

  The FDR Presidential Library will host an author talk and signing at 7 p.m. with Geoffrey C. Ward, coauthor (with Ken Burns) of The Roosevelts: An Intimate History in the Henry A. Wallace Center at the FDR Presidential Library and Home.

The book, created in conjunction with the PBS documentary series of the same name, chronicles the lives of Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt, three members of the most prominent and influential family in American politics.

  Doris Kearns Goodwin—the bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of No Ordinary Time and Team of Rivals—brings her blend of scholarship, intellectual rigor and riveting storytelling to the turbulent and fateful relationship between two presidents, the rise of muckraking journalism, and the far-reaching ferment of the Progressive Era.

Her best-selling book The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism is out this week in paperback.

    Teddy Roosevelt described the power of the presidency to shape public opinion as “The Bully Pulpit”. That's also the title of the new book from presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, in which she writes about William Howard Taft and Teddy Roosevelt and explains the unique relationship forged with reporters.

This is an Off the Shelf edition of The Book Show in partnership with Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, NY and recorded before a live audience.

      Award winning documentary filmmaker, Ken Burns, will be at the Memorial Hall in Shelburne Falls, MA on February 12 at 7pm to present clips from his new seven-part film The Roosevelts: An Intimate History. The 14 hour film will air on PBS later this year. The event will help the Arms Library raise money for the first phase of a multi-year project to restore the historic Pratt Memorial Library Building. To reserve tickets call 413 625 0306.

“The Roosevelts” weaves together the stories of Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt – three members of one of the most prominent and influential families in American politics.

Ken Burns has been making films for more than thirty years. Since the Academy Award nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, Ken has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made, including The Civil War, Baseball, Jazz, The National Parks: America’s Best Idea, The Dust Bowl – and many others.

Doris Kearns Goodwin, the bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of No Ordinary Time and Team of Rivals, has returned to the presidency in her latest book, The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft and the Golden Age of Journalism.

The former LBJ staffer's latest work demonstrates her blend of scholarship, intellectual rigor, and riveting storytelling with a focus on the turbulent and faithful relationship between two presidents, the rise of muckraking journalism, and the far-reaching ferment of the progressive era: a time in many respects uncannily like our own.