tradition

The art of hula is thriving in cities all over the country and the world, but it is not always understood.

In The Natives Are Restless, journalist Constance Hale presents the largely untold story of the dance tradition, using the twin keyholes of Kumu Patrick Makuakane (a Hawai‘i-born, San Francisco–based hula master), and his 350-person arts organization (Na Lei Hulu i ka Wekiu).

In the background, she weaves the poignant story of an ancient people and the resilience of their culture. In the foreground, she tells the story of an electrifying new form of hula that has emerged from a restless generation of artists like Makuakane.

Victuals is an exploration of the foodways, people, and places of Appalachia. Written by Ronni Lundy, regarded as the most engaging authority on the region, the book guides us through the surprisingly diverse history--and vibrant present--of food in the Mountain South.

Victuals explores the diverse and complex food scene of the Mountain South through recipes, stories, traditions, and innovations.

 Brian Kenny is an Emmy Award­–winning broadcaster and host for the MLB Network. The foremost proponent of analytics on sports television, he founded the first and only TV program devoted to sports analytics, Clubhouse Confidential. He currently hosts the daily panel shows MLB Now and MLB Tonight, and is a columnist for Sports on Earth.

In his new book, Ahead of the Curve: Inside the Baseball Revolution, he uses stories from baseball’s present and past to examine why we sometimes choose ignorance over information, and how tradition can trump logic, even when directly contradicted by evidence.

  For more than a decade, Katherine Zoepf has lived in or traveled throughout the Arab world, reporting on the lives of women, whose role in the region has never been more in flux. Only a generation ago, female adolescence as we know it in the West did not exist in the Middle East. There were only children and married women.

Listener Essay - A Passover Story

Apr 3, 2015

  Tina Lincer is a writer living in Loudonville, NY. 

    For twenty-two years, under Founding Conductor and Artistic Director Anna Dubrova, Ne'imah Jewish Community Chorus has served as the voice of Jewish choral music in the Capital District, exploring a rich musical heritage ranging from original works written by contemporary American and Israeli composers to choral arrangements of existing Jewish folk and liturgical music.

For the last few years their annual concert has taken place at The Linda in Albany, NY. This year’s concert is entitled "Songs of Freedom" and will feature guest artist, Peri Smilow. Peri has been touring the world for over twenty years, emphasizing music that promotes social progress and breaks down social barriers. She joins us now to tell us more about her music and her career.

The Irish Edge

Dec 4, 2013

Telling the stories of Irish businesses that have successfully integrated their Irishness with the demands of the global marketplace, The Irish Edge, is a new guide intended as an inspiration to entrepreneurs/innovators and owners of export-oriented businesses.

The Irish Edge tells the stories of successful Irish enterprises that have survived and thrived through the recession, building on culture, tradition, place, identity, language and sustainability.

The enterprises in this book compete, not only on the basis of identity, but by adapting themselves to what is now called the modern ‘experience’ economy.

James Kennelly is co-author of the book and is professor of International Business at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York.

    The Ne’imah Jewish Community Chorus’ 21st annual concert will take place on June 2nd at The Linda in Albany, New York at 7:30pm.

The evening will feature guest artist Cantor Ramόn Tasat - a renowned performing artist and scholar who has devoted himself to sharing with the world the beauty of the Ladino language and Sephardic music and culture.

Pulitzer-Prize winner and UCLA Professor Jared Diamond joins us this morning to discuss his new book: The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?