For years, theater director Bryan Doerries has led an innovative public health project that produces ancient tragedies for current and returned soldiers, addicts, tornado and hurricane survivors, and a wide range of other at-risk people in society.

Drawing on these extraordinary firsthand experiences, Doerries clearly and powerfully illustrates the redemptive and therapeutic potential of this classical, timeless art: how, for example, Ajax can help soldiers and their loved ones better understand and grapple with PTSD, or how Prometheus Bound provides new insights into the modern penal system. These plays are revivified not just in how Doerries applies them to communal problems of today, but in the way he translates them himself from the ancient Greek, deftly and expertly rendering enduring truths in contemporary and striking English.

  Fresh from their starring roles in Cymbeline at the Delacorte Theater in New York, real life couple Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater will appear together at Shakespeare & Company in a special Staged Reading of Shakespeare's great historical tragedy Richard III, to benefit the Company's performance, training and education programs.

This special event will take place on Saturday, October 10 at 2 p.m. in the Tina Packer Playhouse. Ms. Rabe will portray Queen Elizabeth, opposite Mr. Linklater who is cast in the title role. The reading will be directed by Co-Artistic Director Jonathan Croy.

Hamish Linklater and Jonathan Croy join us.


Lionel Delevingne - author/photographer of To the Village Square: From Montague to Fukushima: 1975 – 2014 is a collection of photographs telling the story of citizens who spoke up against the nuclear power industry and who fought for years to stop construction or to close reactors in their backyards.

Through Lionel Delevingne’s record, readers can see the tragedies of the worst accident sites: Three Mile Island in the United States, Chernobyl in Russia, and Fukushima in Japan.

Lionel Delevingne is a photojournalist native of France, settled in the US since 1975, who has traveled and photographed throughout the world. He will be talking about and signing his new book: To the Village Square: From Montague to Fukushima: 1975-2014 on Wednesday, November 5 at 7:00 PM at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

   We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight the Connecticut Humanities Council and talk about the idea of public commemoration and lessons of history.

Our guest is Dr. Matthew Warshauer, Author, public historian, Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University, Chair of the Connecticut Civil War Commemoration Commission and trustee of Connecticut Humanities.

When Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain shot himself with a shotgun in 1994, his mother told a reporter, “Now he’s gone and joined that stupid club,” referring not just to the long list of rock stars who also succumbed to drugs, drink and fame, but also to the roster of legends who left the stage forever at the age of 27.

Photo by Ken Dreyfack

The new novel from Shalom Auslander includes among its characters, Anne Frank. In Hope: A Tragedy: A Novel, she survived the Holocaust and is discovered hiding in the attic of a house in rural New York State being rented by the book's main character.

Auslander is a best-selling memoirist, short story writer, and regular contributor to the public radio program This American Life. With "Hope: A Tragedy," Auslander says he set out to write a comic novel about genocide.