travel

Mya Coviello Shares Her Experience Abroad

Mar 23, 2014

Advocates for studying abroad believe that students who make going overseas a part of their education helps students and future employers develop profound skills. It pushes students to get out of their comfort zone to experience another culture, language, environment, and education system. Essayist Mya Coviello shares her story of studying abroad in Europe.

  From the frigid trans-Siberian railroad to the antiquated Indian Railways to the futuristic MagLev trains, Tom Zoellner offers a stirring story of man’s relationship with trains. In Train: Riding the Rails That Created the Modern World—from the Trans-Siberian to the Southwest Chief, he examines both the mechanics of the rails and their engines and how they helped societies evolve. Not only do trains transport people and goods in an efficient manner, but they also reduce pollution and dependency upon oil.

Zoellner also considers America’s culture of ambivalence to mass transit, using the perpetually stalled line between Los Angeles and San Francisco as a case study in bureaucracy and public indifference.

      When she was just seventeen, independent and ambitious Elizabeth Scarboro fell in love with irreverent and irresistible Stephen. She knew he had cystic fibrosis, that he was expected to live only until the age of thirty or so, and that soon she’d have a choice to make.

She could set out to travel, date, and lead the adventurous life she’d imagined, or she could be with Stephen, who came with an urgency of his own. In choosing him, Scarboro embraced another kind of adventure—simultaneously joyous and heartrending—staying with Stephen and building a life in the ten years they’d have together. The illness would be present in the background of their lives and then ever-more-insistently in the foreground.

Scarboro tells her story of fierce love and its limitations with humor, grace, and remarkable bravery in My Foreign Cities. It is a portrait of a young couple approaching mortality with reckless abandon, gleefully outrunning it for as long as they can.

  Growing up in a small river town in Illinois, Diane Johnson always dreamed of floating down the Mississippi and off to see the world. Years later, at home in France, a French friend teases her: “Indifference to history—that’s why you Americans seem so naïve and don’t really know where you’re from.”

In her new memoir, Flyover Lives, Johnson explores the Midwest and the family’s history. In digging around, she discovered letters and memoirs written by generations of stalwart pioneer ancestors.

Western Mass. Turnpike Tolls Set To Be Restored

Sep 10, 2013
en.wikipedia.org


Tolls will soon return for motorists traveling on the western end of the Massachusetts Turnpike.

The first of two informational hearings is scheduled for tonight on implementation of tolls between Exit 1 in West Stockbridge and Exit 6, which leads to Interstate 291 and Springfield. The meeting will be held at Lee High School.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

A former high school teacher from Columbia County has completed a long trek to raise money so young people can have the opportunity to travel.

Andrew McCarthy

Aug 19, 2013

  Though most renowned for his roles in seminal 80s films like Pretty in Pink and St. Elmo’s Fire, Andrew McCarthy has gone on to become a director, a revered travel journalist and editor-at-large for National Geographic Traveler. In The Longest Way Home: One Man's Quest for the Courage to Settle Down, McCarthy recounts his journey towards self-awareness and his fears of commitment.

An Unfriendly Town

Aug 1, 2013
City of Albany; "X" graffiti by Dave Lucas

Looking for a warm welcome in a new city? Don't come to Albany - that's the message from a new survey of the most and least friendly places on the planet.

WIkimedia Commons/Andrea Di Falco

If you’ve ever found yourself standing on a busy city street corner with one foot in the gutter and an outstretched arm, you know the perils and victory that can be associated with travel by taxi.

We’ve all heard the urban legends of the child born in the back of a cab, or the long lost loves rain soaked reunion in the back seat of a yellow livery car, but today we want to hear your real life “taxi cab confessions” whether hopeful, or harrowing. WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

    Moses Gates is a new breed of adventurer for the 21st century. He thrives on the thrill of seeing what others do not see, let alone even know exists. It all began quite innocuously. After moving to New York City and pursuing graduate studies in Urban Planning, he began unearthing hidden facets of the city—abandoned structures, disused subway stops, incredible rooftop views that belonged to cordoned-off buildings.

In his memoir of his experiences, Hidden Cities, Gates details his travels through underground canals, sewers, subways, and crypts, in metropolises spanning four continents.

Gates describes his immersion in the worldwide subculture of urban exploration; how he joined a world of people who create secret art galleries in subway tunnels, break into national monuments for fun, and travel the globe sleeping in centuries-old catacombs and abandoned Soviet relics rather than hotels or bed-and-breakfasts.

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