Herbert London: On Going Middle East Scenarios

Aug 31, 2016

With the ongoing love fest between Turkey and Russia, there are several interesting and dangerous scenarios emerging for the United States.

Herbert London: The Turkish-Russian Detente

Aug 24, 2016

The world is spinning on its axis very quickly. Conditions that seem to define world affairs yesterday are hopelessly out of date today. There was a time only a couple of years ago when President Obama called Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan his closest friend on the world stage. Erdogan was perceived as a loyal member of NATO and an enemy of Russian’s imperial ambitions in the Middle East. Moreover, Erdogan was devoted to the ouster of Syrian president Bashar Assad, a stance that put him in direct opposition to the Russian strategy. In fact, tensions reached the point of actual conflict when a Russian fighter jet was shot down by Turkish forces near the Syrian border.

  In The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland, New York Times writer and columnist Dan Barry tells the harrowing yet uplifting story of the exploitation and abuse of a resilient group of men with intellectual disability, and the heroic efforts of those who helped them to find justice and reclaim their lives.

In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, dozens of men, all with intellectual disability and all from Texas, lived in an old schoolhouse. Before dawn each morning, they were bussed to a nearby processing plant, where they eviscerated turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. They lived in near servitude for more than thirty years, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse—until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious labor lawyer helped these men achieve freedom.

  The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence.

Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay. With the help of naval officer Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people.


  Situated hundreds of miles from any other settlement, deep within the inhospitable desert of northern Kenya where only thorn bushes grow, Dadaab is a city like no other. Its buildings are made from mud, sticks or plastic, its entire economy is grey, and its citizens survive on rations and luck. Over the course of four years, Ben Rawlence became a first-hand witness to a strange and desperate limbo-land, getting to know many of those who have come there seeking sanctuary.

In City of Thorns, Rawlence interweaves the stories of nine individuals to show what life is like in the camp and to sketch the wider political forces that keep the refugees trapped there.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand last week led an official Senate trip to the Middle East to meet with allies to discuss strategy to fight global terrorism. Her trip included meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Reuven Rivlin.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is accepting public comments through June 29 on regulatory proposals for hunting and trapping of wild turkey, deer and fisher.

What we do know, or think we know, that just isn’t true? There are myths, riddles and indeterminate conditions, but for many these factors are ignored in favor of what one believes to be true.

10/2/14 Panel

Oct 2, 2014


  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman, Ira Fusfeld.

Topics include:
Secret Service chief resigns
EBOLA fears in Texas
Hong Kong

New Hampshire Governor's office

New Hampshire Governor Maggie Hassan is leading a trade mission to Turkey in hopes of spurring trade with the Granite State. She discussed the trip on a conference call this week.

David Nightingale: A Coup In Turkey In 1963

Mar 29, 2014

There had been a roar, waking me up, and as I rubbed my eyes I realized there'd been a whole background of roars, which hadn't exactly been dreams.

The confluence of bad news items has thrown the Turkish economy into a tailspin. Once the darling of Wall Street and a model for emerging markets, Turkey is now in the economic doldrums. Since the world downturn in 2008 Turkey has been faltering. The miracle of economic prosperity from 2002 to 2003 attributed to Premier Erdogan, now seems like a chimera.

David Nightingale: Christmas in Turkey, 1961

Jan 2, 2014

Christmas in the Middle East, 1961. The Moslem headmaster had insisted we take the Christian holiday, although we hadn't asked for it.

Herbert London: Turkey At The Barricades

Jan 1, 2014

The dreams of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Prime Minister of Turkey, for the recrudescence of the Ottoman Empire are evaporating under the Istanbul sky. His party The Justice and Development party (AKP), is in disarray; a major corruption and bribery scandal has led to accusations about cabinet members and their families. The investigation prompted Erdogan to say “The judiciary will pay.”

Quake in Aegean Sea shakes Turkey and Greece

Jan 8, 2013
Horia Varlan / Flickr

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — An earthquake centered beneath the Aegean Sea shook cities and islands in Turkey and Greece on Tuesday, causing panic in some areas but no injuries or damage, officials said.

The Istanbul-based Kandilli Observatory said the quake, with a preliminary magnitude of 6.2, occurred at 4:16 p.m. (1416 GMT) off the coast from Turkey's northwestern Canakkale province.