underground railroad

It’s well known that in the early 1800’s, slaves who escaped captivity used a loosely knit group of safe houses called the Underground Railroad to find safety and freedom in the North. But some found themselves finding freedom in the other direction.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to the author of a book for grade schoolers taken from a family’s oral history called Go South for Freedom.

blackheritagetours.com

A boost for New York State tourism was launched today in downtown Albany.

The event was hosted by Mayor Kathy Sheehan at Albany’s historic City Hall.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

This morning at Albany City Hall, The Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area and the Hudson River Valley Greenway announced 17 grants to cultural and historic organizations throughout the Hudson Valley.

Juneteenth 2015

Jun 18, 2015
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The annual holiday celebrating the end of slavery in the U.S. is being observed throughout the Northeast.

  The Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region's 14th Annual Public History Conference is taking place this weekend - April 17-19.

This year's conference is entitled "Breaking Free: Civil War, Emancipation, and Beyond" and will feature among its events, a Saturday Morning Keynote - "Underground Railroad to the Fight Against Neoliberal Racism: The Long Struggle for Black Liberation" presented by Henry Louis Taylor, PhD, a Professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at University at Buffalo and the Founding Director of the Center for Urban Studies.

Dr. Henry Louis Taylor, Jr.'s research focuses on a historical and contemporary analysis of distressed urban neighborhoods, social isolation and race and class issues among people of color, especially African Americans and Latinos.

Utica Remembers Role In Abolitionist Movement

Mar 31, 2014
Dave Chanatry

Almost 200 years ago, Utica was home to a passionate abolitionist community determined to rid the young nation of slavery. Now a local group is trying to remind the public of the significance of the city’s role in the anti-slavery movement.

All month we've been learning about the NEH film series, Created Equal. One of those films, The Abolitionists tells the story of the struggle to end slavery. This week, we'll learn how this struggle played out locally and why it still matters today.

Mary Liz Stewart is the Executive Director of the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region and she joins us to tell us more.

  This Friday, Saturday, and Sunday – The Sage Colleges will host The 12th Public History Conference on the Underground Railroad Movement.

The conference is entitled “Milestones on the Road to Freedom: The Emancipation Proclamation, Harriet Tubman, and the March on Washington - a Legacy and a Future" – it is organized by the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region, Inc. and Co-sponsored by: The Sage Colleges and The Department of History and Society, Russell Sage College.

Here to tell us all about it are Mary Liz Stewart and Paul Stewart - co-founders and directors of the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region and conference organizers and Andor Skotnes, professor and chair of Sage's Department of History and Society, event organizer, and conference keynote speaker.

Bestselling author, Tracy Chevalier, is celebrated for her rich, beautiful novels spun around captivating European historical figures such as Johannes Vermeer, the Dutch painter featured in Chevalier’s tour-de-force blockbuster Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Underground Railroad: Escape to Freedom is a book + audio + boardgame for children. The book and audio were researched and recorded on location following routes of the UGRR.

With action and adventure as key elements, the experiential boardgame uses UGRR lore, nature signs, survival skills, and African-American spirituals (now known to be secret codes) to engage children in history, foster understanding, and sharpen critical thinking skills.