urban planning

In recent years, the young, educated, and affluent have surged back into cities, reversing decades of suburban flight and urban decline. And yet all is not well, Richard Florida argues in The New Urban Crisis. Florida, one of the first scholars to anticipate this back-to-the-city movement in his groundbreaking The Rise of the Creative Class, demonstrates how the same forces that power the growth of the world's superstar cities also generate their vexing challenges: gentrification, unaffordability, segregation, and inequality.

Richard Florida is University Professor and Director of Cities at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and Distinguished Fellow at NYU's Schack Institute of Real Estate. He is Senior Editor at The Atlantic, editor-at-large for The Atlantic's CityLab, and founder of the Creative Class Group.

Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, is here to tell us about his new book: The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America which explores how the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

Richard Rothstein is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. He is a Fellow of the Haas Institute at the University of California Berkeley. 

William W. Goldsmith is Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University. He is coauthor of Separate Societies: Poverty and Inequality in U.S. Cities.

In his new book, Saving Our Cities, William W. Goldsmith shows how cities can be places of opportunity rather than places with problems. With strongly revived cities and suburbs, working as places that serve all their residents, metropolitan areas will thrive, thus making the national economy more productive, the environment better protected, the citizenry better educated, and the society more reflective, sensitive, and humane.

In The Well-Tempered City, Jonathan F. P. Rose distills a lifetime of interdisciplinary research and firsthand experience into a five-pronged model for how to design and reshape our cities with the goal of equalizing their landscape of opportunity.

Rose works with cities and not-for-profits to plan and build green affordable and mixed-income housing and cultural, health, and educational centers. Recognized for creating communities that literally heal both residents and neighborhoods, Rose is one of the nation's leading thinkers on the integration of environmental, social, and economic solutions to the urban issues facing us today.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're going to speak with Anne Mosher and learn about engaged place-making and the process of what she calls “urban acupuncture," -- how sketch mapping a community can bring out deeply buried memories about places, and do so in a targeted way.

Anne Mosher about is associate professor of geography at Syracuse University and New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholar.

  Janette Sadik-Khan is one of the world’s foremost authorities on transportation and urban transformation. During her time as New York City’s Transportation Commissioner from 2007 to 2013, under former mayor Michael Bloomberg, Janette Sadik-Khan transformed the streets of one of the world’s toughest cities into dynamic spaces that are safe for pedestrians and bikers. Now a principal with Bloomberg Associates, Sadik-Khan works with mayors around the world to reimagine and redesign their cities.

In Streetfight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution, Sadik-Khan provides a roadmap for rethinking, reinvigorating, and redesigning city streets across the country to function better for the people and communities that use them. The book was co-authored by Seth Solomonow who joins us along with Janette Sakid-Khan.

There are a number of iconic elements that make up New York City, The Empire State Building, Time Square, Rockefeller Center, The Statue of Liberty, but long before these landmarks could come to define "The Big City" its very structure had to be developed. The new book City on a Grid: How New York Became New York, tells just that story. How New York City's streets came to form its rectilinear grid that millions of people now walk through everyday.

    Moses Gates is a new breed of adventurer for the 21st century. He thrives on the thrill of seeing what others do not see, let alone even know exists. It all began quite innocuously. After moving to New York City and pursuing graduate studies in Urban Planning, he began unearthing hidden facets of the city—abandoned structures, disused subway stops, incredible rooftop views that belonged to cordoned-off buildings.

In his memoir of his experiences, Hidden Cities, Gates details his travels through underground canals, sewers, subways, and crypts, in metropolises spanning four continents.

Gates describes his immersion in the worldwide subculture of urban exploration; how he joined a world of people who create secret art galleries in subway tunnels, break into national monuments for fun, and travel the globe sleeping in centuries-old catacombs and abandoned Soviet relics rather than hotels or bed-and-breakfasts.

  Jeff Speck has dedicated his career to determining what makes cities thrive. And he has boiled it down to one key factor: walkability.