U.S. Presidential politics

Vote sign
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It’s Super Tuesday 3—Mega Tuesday. Another week, and another set of influential primary races. This time, they’re in Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina and Florida. Will this be the day one of Donald Trump’s rivals surges ahead, or will it be his day to clinch the nomination? And will Hillary Clinton widen her lead over Bernie Sanders, or will Bernie see his surge?

Vote sign
wikipedia commons

It’s Super Tuesday II. Another week, and another set of influential primary races. This time, they’re in Michigan, Mississippi, Idaho and Hawaii. Will this be the day one of Trump’s rivals surges ahead, or will it be his day to clinch the nomination? And will Hillary Clinton widen her lead over Bernie sanders, or will Bernie see his surge?

With just over a month to go before New York’s Presidential primary, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are leading their respective party voters in a new poll. 

This commentary first aired on November 6, 2012.

Ever since the first American hostages of church-state confederacy resolved to sever themselves from authoritarian domination by coalitions of royalty and its religious authenticators, self-styled advocates have attempted to influence the form of our newly-won freedom.  Prompted by profit oriented off-shoots of the original order, they have invariably prodded their quarry to cede autonomy for the assurance of corporate stability and significance.  Their lucre-amplified logic?  Fiduciary federation provides the most dependable source of freedom.  What they’ve blithely and intentionally overlooked was who controls the combination to the lock on the cash box.

nationalpopularvote.com

New York lawmakers have approved a bill that would enter the state in the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, an agreement to award electoral votes to the presidential candidate who receives the majority of the popular vote.

Proponents of the National Popular Vote initiative believe that the Electoral College, in place since the first days of  the nation, is not the best way to elect a president.

After the 2000 presidential election which saw Al Gore win the popular vote, but George Bush win the White House, there was an outcry by some to get rid of the Electoral College.  A bill to change that system has just cleared the New York State Assembly.  

The measure is being supported by Albany area Assemblywoman Patricia Fahy, a Democrat, who says the bill would have New York join an interstate compact in which states would give all of their Electoral College votes to the presidential candidate who wins the popular vote nationwide. Fahy spoke with WAMC’s Brian Shields.

Obama's second inauguration: What's the point?

Jan 24, 2013
Sally Mairs

As the buzz surrounding President Obama’s second inauguration grew, so did talk over the point of celebrating the ceremony for a second time. Some asked whether this was a necessary tradition, or simply a costly affair that was inappropriate for such tough economic times.

Yet an estimated one million people chose to travel to the nation’s capital to see the ceremony on Monday—often standing from a distance where nothing could be seen—and those that I spoke with had no trouble explaining to me why the ceremony was important to them.

Nick Knupffer / Flickr

President Barack Obama was inaugurated today to his second and final term in office.

On this edition of Vox Pop we want to hear your take on the president’s second inauguration and what you hope a second Obama term will mean for the country.

Post your questions and comments below to have them read on-air. You can also post your questions on our Facebook page or tweet us @WAMCVoxPop.

On this edition of Vox Pop - what did you think of President Barack Obama's first press conference since his reelction? WAMC's Ray Graf hosts.

On this edition of Vox Pop, how is your Election Day going? WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts with WAMC's Ray Graf.

If high school students could vote, President Barack Obama would sail to an easy re-election. A mock vote was held at 130 high schools across the country, and on Sunday night, the votes were counted. Obama received 50 percent of the vote and 316 electoral votes, while Mitt Romney took 41 percent of the popular vote, and 208 electoral votes. This mock election has been held every four years since 1988. It was organized by Jim Shea a teacher at Northfield-Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts. He spoke with WAMC’s Brian Shields.

The 2012 presidential contest between President Barack Obama and Republican candidate Mitt Romney represents the comeback of GOP boss Karl Rove, according to Vanity Fair investigative reporter Craig Unger. He joins us to discuss his new book, Boss Rove: Inside Karl Rove's Secret Kingdom of Power

Last night marked the final presidential debate before Election Day in a mere two weeks. On this edition of Vox Pop we ask, who won the final debate? WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

Last night marked the final presidential debate before Election Day in a mere two weeks. On this edition of Vox Pop we ask, who won the final debate? WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

Last night marked the final presidential debate before Election Day in a mere two weeks. On this edition of Vox Pop we ask, who won the final debate? WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

University at Albany

If women were the only people who voted for president, Barack Obama would be poised to re-take the White House next month with a higher margin of victory than he had in 2008.

If only men voted, Mitt Romney would have the possibility of issuing a crushing defeat along the lines of Ronald Reagan’s 1980 victory over Jimmy Carter.

After weeks of somewhat troubling news out of his campaign, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney scored points a few weeks ago after what pundits have described as an un-engaging performance by President Barack Obama in the first presidential debate.

Obama and Romney will meet again on the debate floor tonight, this time at Hofstra University on Long Island…

On this edition of Vox Pop we want your take on tonight’s debate. Can the president stage a comeback, or will Romney carry the day for a second time. WAMC’s Alan Chartock hosts.

A spotlight has been cast on the foreign policy positions of the presidential candidates following recent violent protests in the Middle East.

Today we want to know what you think would be best for the United State’s place in the world – four more years of President Barack Obama, or the proposed policies of Mitt Romney? WAMC’s Alan Chartock hosts.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has again found himself the focus of negative publicity following the posting of video of the candidate by the progressive news outlet Mother Jones during which he told supporters that he will never convince “47 percent” of Americans who he said will, “support the president no matter what,” because they believe they are “victims” entitled to be cared for by the government.

Today we want your reaction to Romney’s comments and to what people are saying about those comments today. WAMC’s Alan Chartock hosts.

Today at 5 p.m., Democratic delegates from across the country will be called to order in Charlotte, North Carolina for the first evening of the Democratic National Convention, where on Thursday President Barack Obama will accept the party’s nomination and make his case for re-election.

The DNC follows last week’s Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, which concluded with a speech by GOP candidate Mitt Romney that some say gained him some ground with undecided voters.

Times Union

Republicans will end their national convention in Tampa tonight with a speech by their presidential nominee, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. The polls suggest that New York is well out of play for Romney, with the Obama-Biden ticket holding a strong lead in one of the bluest of blue states. Still it’s been a busy few days for the New York delegation in Tampa. WAMC’s Brian Shields spoke this morning with Jimmy Vielkind of the Albany Times Union, who is covering the Republican National Convention.

On this edition of Vox Pop, we want your opinion on presumptive Republican vice presidential contender Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan. WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

With Election Day only about four months away, President Barack Obama and presumed Republican candidate Mitt Romney have kicked their campaigns into high gear.

The week so far seems to be a loser for Romney, who topped the headlines not for suggesting bold policy changes, but for a series of campaign gaffes that called into question his stances on race in America and international relations.

The 2012 presidential campaigns are just getting fired up with attacks flying from both sides. On this edition of Vox Pop we want you to play campaign manager of either party. How would you propel President Obama or Mitt Romney to the White House in November? WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

On this very special extended edition of Vox Pop, we follow President Barack Obama's speech at the University at Albany's College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering with a discussion of his remarks and the 2012 presidential contest. WAMC's Ray Graf and Alan Chartock co-host, plus a live-in-studio pre-presidential event report from Joe Donahue.

This year’s U.S. presidential and congressional contests are expected to be the most expensive elections in the nation’s history. Despite the still struggling economy, millions of dollars are being poured into campaign war-chests and the accounts of political action committees, leaving many wondering, “Where does the money come from?”

The Murdochs, the president, and prostitutes; it's an open forum on this edition of Vox Pop. WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

While the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination continues today with contests in Wisconsin, Maryland, and Washington D.C., politicians and pundits are already looking ahead to the 2016 Democratic nomination.

Two names that have been mentioned as potential democratic candidates are New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and secretary of state and former New York U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton.