vaccinations

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The chairman of the Health Care Committee in the Vermont House says a majority of the panel supports eliminating the philosophical exemption for parents who don't want to have their children vaccinated.

The Vermont House Health Care Committee is taking three days of testimony this week on a bill that would eliminate the state’s philosophical exemption allowing parents to opt out of a child’s vaccinations.

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Health professionals throughout New York are spreading the word: get vaccinated!

Health advocates want to convey the message that immunizing our children is good for them and for our communities, and essential to public health.   For each of the routine childhood vaccines, the national health promotion and disease prevention initiative Healthy People 2020 target is 90 percent coverage. On average, 95 percent of all students in New York are fully immunized. But recent outbreaks of long-controlled diseases and a burgeoning anti-vaccination minority have officials concerned.

  In recent years, there have been major outbreaks of whooping cough among children in California, mumps in New York, and measles in Ohio’s Amish country—despite the fact that these are all vaccine-preventable diseases.

While America is the most medically advanced place in the world, many people bypass modern medicine in favor of using their faith to fight life threatening illnesses.

According to our next guest, children suffer and die every year from treatable diseases, and in most states it is legal for parents to deny their children care for religious reasons.

Dr. Paul Offit is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His new book is Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine.

2/10/15 Panel

Feb 10, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain and SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include Alabama gay marriage; Obama meeting with Merkel on Ukraine crisis; HSBC under scrutiny; and measles parties.

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Public health expert Dr. Sean Philpott-Jones joins us in the studio to shed some light on the growing anti-vaccination movement in the United States, and what it means for public health.

1/29/15 Panel

Jan 29, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and WAMC Newsman, Ray Graf.

Topics include an update on Sheldon Silver, California school bans students without vaccinations, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's scheduled speech to the U.S. Congress, Attorney general nominee Loretta E. Lynch, and Biofuels.

Last week, I got into an argument with a friend of mine about the flu vaccine. He felt that the vaccine was unnecessary and unsafe. In fact, he claimed, every time he'd been vaccinated, he came down with the flu.

Vermont Health Department officials have rewritten rules designed to implement a new law on childhood immunizations, but some parents aren't satisfied with how those changes are being made.

An earlier draft of the rules said when parents want to exempt their child from vaccinations they need to sign a form implying they agree with the Health Department's assessment of the vaccines' risks and benefits. Parents who have expressed skepticism about vaccines say that's compelled speech, and that it violates the First Amendment.

An increasing number of Connecticut students are being exempted from vaccinations as parents cite allergic reactions or religious prohibitions. WAMC’s Lucas Willard has more…

The Connecticut Post reports that according to the state Department of Public Health, 1,056 children entering kindergarten and seventh grade last year received exemptions. That's up by 127 percent from 2003, when the state recorded 465 such exemptions.

Vaccination coverage in Connecticut still remains high, with more than 97 percent receiving various vaccinations.