vaccine

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The University at Albany is responding to eight confirmed cases of mumps on campus.

Until the late 1960s, tens of thousands of American children suffered crippling birth defects if their mothers had been exposed to rubella, popularly known as German measles, while pregnant; there was no vaccine and little understanding of how the disease devastated fetuses. In June 1962, a young biologist in Philadelphia, using tissue extracted from an aborted fetus from Sweden, produced safe, clean cells that allowed the creation of vaccines against rubella and other common childhood diseases. Two years later, in the midst of a devastating German measles epidemic, his colleague developed the vaccine that would one day wipe out homegrown rubella. The rubella vaccine and others made with those fetal cells have protected more than 150 million people in the United States, the vast majority of them preschoolers. 

Meredith Wadman covered biomedical research politics from Washington for twenty years. She is a reporter at  Science and has written for NatureFortune, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. A graduate of Stanford and Columbia, she began medical school at the University of British Columbia and completed her medical degree as a Rhodes scholar at the University of Oxford.

Her new book is The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease

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Health professionals throughout New York are spreading the word: get vaccinated!

Health advocates want to convey the message that immunizing our children is good for them and for our communities, and essential to public health.   For each of the routine childhood vaccines, the national health promotion and disease prevention initiative Healthy People 2020 target is 90 percent coverage. On average, 95 percent of all students in New York are fully immunized. But recent outbreaks of long-controlled diseases and a burgeoning anti-vaccination minority have officials concerned.

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BOSTON (AP) - State officials are offering reassurances that there is plenty of vaccine still available for people who are still looking to get a flu shot.

Interim public health commissioner Lauren Smith said Thursday the state has distributed 760,000 doses of vaccine so far this season, and there remains ample supply. She said officials are working with local boards of health that are looking to open public clinics to meet the demand for flu shots.

Officials say there have been 6,000 laboratory confirmed cases of flu in Massachusetts and 18 flu-related deaths.