violence

Dave Lucas / WAMC

Update: 1:02 p.m.

Two Troy police officers were shot Saturday night in the Capital Region city's Lansingburgh neighborhood.

MidHudsonNews.com

Residents of Newburgh Friday evening gathered at the site of the city’s latest murder, its fourth this year, to call for an end to the violence in the city.

wikipedia.org

An early morning shooting in Schenectady occurred at the same location as an anti-violence rally held on Friday afternoon.

The Daily Gazette reports a 27-year-old male was shot multiple times on Schenectady Street around 1 a.m. Sunday. He was taken to Albany Medical Center and is reported in stable condition.

No arrests have been made.

Concha García Hernández/Wikimedia

It’s often an unseen or unrecognized form of violence.  But it’s also one of the most common crimes and among the most dangerous to emergency responders.  Weapons can be anything from guns to hands to knives or even words.  In the final part of our weeklong series 'Crime in our Communities,’ WAMCs' North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley looks at domestic violence. 

  T. C. Boyle has been called by the New York Times - "one of the most inventive and verbally exuberant writers of his generation." Boyle is the bestselling author of fourteen novels and nine short story collections.

His newest book, The Harder They Come, explores anti-authoritarianism and the bloodshed that can accompany it.

  From drone warfare in the Middle East to digital spying by the National Security Agency, the U.S. government has harnessed the power of cutting-edge technology to awesome effect. But what happens when ordinary people have the same tools at their fingertips? Advances in cybertechnology, biotechnology, and robotics mean that more people than ever before have access to potentially dangerous technologies—from drones to computer networks and biological agents—which could be used to attack states and private citizens alike.

In The Future of Violence, law and security experts Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum detail the myriad possibilities, challenges, and enormous risks present in the modern world, and argue that if our national governments can no longer adequately protect us from harm, they will lose their legitimacy. We welcome Gabriella Blum to The Roundtable.

  Bryan Burrough is a special correspondent at Vanity Fair and the author of five previous books, including The Big Rich and Public Enemies. His new book is Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence.

There was a stretch of time in America, during the 1970s, when bombings by domestic underground groups like The Weathermen, The Symbionese Liberation Army, The FALN, and The Black Liberation Army were a daily occurrence. The FBI combated those groups and others as nodes in a single revolutionary underground, dedicated to the violent overthrow of the American government.

The FBI’s response to the leftist revolutionary counterculture has not been treated kindly by history, Burrough’s book tempers those judgments with an understanding of just how deranged those times were.

  In a remarkable 50 year literary career, Joyce Carol Oates has given readers incisive explorations of violence, race, class, sex, and gender in America.

Her new novel, The Sacrifice, examines the confluence of political, social, and moral complexities that fuel a community’s reaction to an alleged crime against a young black girl.

    Dinaw Mengestu’s work, including his first two novels, have earned him incredible critical acclaim as well as a MacArthur Foundation genius grant and selection by the New Yorker as one of their “20 Under 40” young writers central to their generation. And writing about his new novel, All Our Names, Kirkus Reviews calls Mengestu, “among the best novelists now at work in America.”

  Psychiatrist Stephen Seager was no stranger to locked psych wards when he accepted a job at California’s Gorman State hospital, known locally as “Gomorrah,” but nothing could have prepared him for what he encountered when he stepped through its gates, a triple sally port behind the twenty-foot walls topped with shining coils of razor wire. 

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