voting

Jim Levulis / WAMC

It’s Election Day, and once again the question is how many people will go to the polls. With the governor's seat up for grabs and four ballot questions to decide, early voter turnout in Pittsfield, Massachusetts is surprising some.

wikipedia.org

A recent national poll looked at how young people will affect the midterm elections.

Pollster Harstad Strategic Research used a diverse sampling of more than 2,000 registered and nonregistered voters 18 to 30 years old. They represent 38 million registered voters of that age. Paul Harstad is a lead pollster for the research group that has polled for President Barack Obama since 2002, when the Democrat was an Illinois state senator considering a run for the U.S. Senate.

Blair Horner: Voting In New York

Apr 28, 2014

The US Census published a report on voting in America last week that was the usual – the nation’s voters don’t go to the polls as often as they should and in some parts of the country, like New York, and for some age groups – mainly young voters – the turnout has been dreadful.

Apathy In Young Voters, Again

Nov 17, 2013
John Quigley

Election Day has come and gone, and a perpetual issue remains: Why do young people, by and large, stay away from the polls?

Common Cause Teams With Techies To Help Voters

Sep 9, 2013
Wikipedia Commons

The return of lever voting machines  in New York could create problems on Election Day, so Common Cause is stepping in to help voters.

The good-government group is helping to re-launch PollWatchUSA. That's a cross-platform mobile web application to help New Yorkers across the state report problems at the polls on Election Day.

PollWatchUSA is a crowd-sourcing tool that allows anyone with a smart phone to act as a poll monitor. The tool was originally launched in September 2012 in New York City and over one thousand voters took advantage of it.

  Today, August 6th is the anniversary of the 1965 signing of the Voting Rights Act. Historian Gary May’s newest book is Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy. In it, he traces the history of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 from its creation during the heyday of the civil rights era to the challenges its historic provisions face. Recent developments have plunged the VRA—and the newest efforts to decimate it—back into the headlines.

BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts voters heading to the polls on primary day in this year's special U.S. Senate election will find something that was missing from last year's Senate race — a choice of candidates.

Three Republicans and two Democrats say they've collected more than the 10,000 certified signatures needed to land a spot on the April 30 ballot.

Former U.S. Attorney Michael Sullivan said Wednesday his volunteer signature effort was successful and he'll join state Rep. Daniel Winslow and Cohasset businessman Gabriel Gomez on the Republican ballot.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Secretary of State William Galvin says a record number of Massachusetts voters cast ballots on Election Day.

Galvin says 3,184,196 people voted on Nov. 6, or 73.3 percent of the state's 4.3 million voters. That was about 81,000 more than participated in the elections of November 2008.

The final vote tallies are scheduled to be submitted to the Governor's Council on Wednesday for certification.

Vote certification means that the right to repair and medical marijuana ballot questions approved take effect Jan. 1.

Slow Democracy: Rediscovering Community, Bringing Decision Making Back Home is a new book that chronicles the ways in which ordinary people have mobilized to find local solutions to local problems. It invites us to bring the advantages of "slow" to our community decision-making.

Connecticut's Latino and Puerto Rican Affairs Commission is calling for Latinos to make their voices heard in the upcoming November election.

Commission chairman Isaias Diaz says Latinos have suffered disproportionately during the recession and they need to vote to play a role in the recovery.

The secretary of the state's office estimates the number of registered Latino voters in Connecticut at about 176,700, but only about a half of them typically vote.

Pages