voting rights

3/9/15 Panel

Mar 9, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include: Nuclear Deal Offered to Iran; Russia's anti-American sentiment; Two charged in killing of Boris Nemtsov; Eric Holder on voting rights and Selma; and the Apple Watch.

    

  Between November 1963, when he became president, and November 1966, when his party was routed in the midterm elections, Lyndon Johnson spearheaded the most transformative agenda in American political history since the New Deal.

In just three years, Johnson drove the passage of the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts; the War on Poverty program; Medicare and Medicaid; the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities; Public Broadcasting; immigration liberalization; a raft of consumer and environmental protection acts; and major federal investments in public transportation.

Collectively, this group of achievements was labeled by Johnson and his team the “Great Society.” In his new book, The Fierce Urgency of Now, Princeton Professor of History Julian Zelizer looks at the full story.

Yesterday, President Obama posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, a Black Mississippian and two white New Yorkers, murdered fifty years ago, working to register Blacks to vote in Mississippi. They were among many who lost their lives in that struggle.

  The Supreme Court has some major rulings set to come down this year.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Voting Rights Act ruling will be among the court’s most closely watched.