war

  For the first time, religious self-identification is on the decline in American. Some analysts have cited as cause a post-9/11 perception: that faith in general is a source of aggression, intolerance, and divisiveness—something bad for society. But how accurate is that view?

In her book, Fields of Blood: Religion and the History of Violence, Karen Armstrong sets out to discover the truth about religion and violence in each of the world’s great traditions, taking us on an astonishing journey from prehistoric times to the present.

Listener Essay - And Also Our Thanks

Nov 11, 2014

  And Also Our Thanks

One Sunday in Paris with my friends Garry and Martine, we searched for the remains of the old Bastille. What’s left of this fortress today is a few foundation stones, forming an outline of the building in Paris’s cobbled streets. Despite connotations of revolution and war, the Bastille really isn’t all that big.

In no time we had rounded the block to find ourselves in front of a pharmacy. I quickly went in to buy something. I walked out to find my friends talking with an older gentleman on his way to the market. As I was introduced, he asked if I was an American.

“Je suis Américain” I replied in my cobbled-together French.

Then he thanked me for saving France.

"Bring the War Home," which had been a rallying cry of the anti-Vietnam-War movement, was transformed on May 4, 1970 into a macabre irony when the Ohio National Guard opened fire on student anti-war protesters at Kent State, killing four and wounding nine. Many, certainly not all, of the anti-war student activists were chauvinist, privileged, white men.

Everyone agrees that our troops deserve a return to productive and creative lives after service. Yet, in spite of billions spent on psychological care and reintegration programs, we face an epidemic of combat-related conditions like PTSD. What's the solution? In Warrior's Return, Dr. Edward Tick reveals what's missing in our approach to helping our veterans acclimate from the battlefield to civilian live.

    Joe Gannon is a writer and spoken word artist. He was also a freelance journalist during the Sandinista Revolution, writing for the Christian Science Monitor and the San Francisco Examiner.

In his new novel, Night of the Jaguar, he takes readers to the land of Nicaragua in the mid-eighties, a place recovering from one conflict and descending into another.

    Investigative journalist Eric Schlosser joins us to discuss the dilemma that has existed since the dawn of the nuclear age: how do you deploy weapons of mass destruction?

Drawing on recently declassified documents and in-depth interviews with the individuals who designed and routinely handled nuclear weapons, Schlosser reveals that America’s nuclear weapons have been plagued by accidents, mistakes, and near-misses since their inception and that even the best control systems are no match for human error.

    

  In the spring of 2001, three women enlisted in the Indiana National Guard. Each had her own idea of what a stint in the Guard might mean — free education, a sense of purpose, extra money. But just months after they signed up, the 9/11 attacks occurred and what they thought would be a couple days of drills each month turned into long overseas deployments.

In her new book, Soldier Girls: The Battles of Three Women at Home and at War, Helen Thorpe follows the lives of Desma Brooks, Michelle Fischer and Debbie Helton for 12 years.

    The Mental Health Foundation will honor award-winning TV journalist Bob Woodruff at its annual August Evening in Saratoga, Monday August 18 at the Saratoga National Golf Course.

Woodruff, whose miraculous recovery from traumatic brain injury suffered while on assignment for ABC TV in Iraq in 2006, will be recognized for his outstanding work with the Bob Woodruff Foundation. The Bob Woodruff Foundation helps returning veterans address their life challenges, including mental health issues.

    

  Located in New Windsor, New York, the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor commemorates the extraordinary sacrifices of America's servicemen and service women who were killed or wounded in combat. The mission of the Hall of Honor is to collect and preserve the stories of Purple Heart recipients from all branches of service and across generations to ensure that all recipients are represented.

To tell us more we are joined by the Executive Director of the Purple Heart Hall of Honor, Inc., Andrew Komonchak.

    In his comprehensive history, The Rise of the Tudors, Chris Skidmore chronicles the early story of the Tudors, beginning with the birth of the future Henry VII and following his life through the tumultuous Wars of the Roses, which ended with Henry’s coronation.

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