war

  Based on years of intensive primary document research, Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East definitively overturns received wisdom on how the modern Middle East was formed. Sweeping in its action, keen in its portraiture, acid in its condemnation of the destruction wrought by European colonial plots, this is a book that brilliantly captures the way in which the folly of the past creates the anguish of the present.

Scott Anderson is an American novelist, journalist, and a veteran war correspondent.

  If All The Sky Were Paper is a new play by Andrew Carroll based on his New York Times bestselling books War Letters: Extraordinary Correspondence from American Wars and Behind the Lines: Powerful and Revealing American and Foreign War Letters - And One Man's Search to Find Them.

In 1998, Carroll launched The Legacy Project, a national, all-volunteer initiative that works to find and preserve wartime correspondence. Carroll has traveled to 40 countries, including Iraq and Afghanistan, to seek out what he calls "the world's great, undiscovered literature,"and he has collected more than 90,000 previously unpublished letters and e-mails from every conflict in U.S. history.

The play has recently awarded a prestigious $20,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and a $10,000 grant from the California Humanities to help reach audiences around the country through a series of readings and performances. The newly created Center for American War Letters, which Carroll founded, will house the Legacy Project's collection at Chapman University.

If All The Sky Were Paper will be performed at The Linda on Saturday, November 16 at 8:00 pm.

We are joined by Andrew Carroll and John Benitz, director of the production and Associate Professor in the College of Performing Arts - Department of Theatre at Chapman University in Orange, CA.

There’s something strangely illusory in the approach (in less than a month) of the 69th  Anniversary of the end of WWII.  For those of us in the inexorably dwindling number of veterans in this category, there are the unsettling news stories of the “Right-Wing surge in Europe,” and the seemingly continuing inability of former allies (This nation included) to achieve peaceful resolutions to still volatile and incendiary ignitions.  These are dramatically fuelled by the wars and continuing intolerance of nations, still at odds over the seeming inequities that defy our abilities to analyze and end them.

"Theater of War" is a public health project, having produced hundreds of dramatic readings of Greek tragedies for mixed civilian and military audiences to start a conversation about the return of soldiers to civilian life.

Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY is hosting "Theater of War" for a dramatic reading of scenes from Sophocles' "Ajax" on Sunday, Nov. 3rd from 4:00-6:00p in the Vassar Chapel in association with the Vassar College Department of Greek and Roman Studies.

Bryan Doerries is the Founder and Artistic Director of “Theater of War” and he joins us to tell us more.

    John Lawton is a producer/director in television who has spent much of his time interpreting the USA to the English, and occasionally vice versa. He has worked with Gore Vidal, Neil Simon, Scott Turow, Noam Chomsky, Fay Weldon, Harold Pinter and Kathy Acker. He is the author of 1963, a social and political history of the Kennedy-Macmillan years, six thrillers in the Troy series and a stand-alone novel, Sweet Sunday.

His latest, Then We Take Berlin is a gripping, meticulously researched and richly detailed historical thriller – a moving story of espionage and war, and people caught up in the most tumultuous events of the twenty-first century.

Malalai Joya

Oct 9, 2013

Malalai Joya was named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2010. An extraordinary young woman raised in the refugee camps of Iran and Pakistan, Joya became a teacher in secret girls’ schools, hiding her books under her burqa so the Taliban couldn’t find them.

She helped establish a free medical clinic and orphanage in her impoverished home province; and at a constitutional assembly in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 2003, she stood up and denounced her country’s powerful NATO-backed warlords. She was twenty-five years old.

Two years later, she became the youngest person elected to Afghanistan’s new Parliament. In 2007, she was suspended from Parliament for her persistent criticism of the warlords and drug barons.

Malalai Joya has a pair of events in our region today. She will be speaking tonight at 7:00 pm at the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany on Washington Avenue and at 1:00 pm at the Bush Memorial Auditorium at Russell Sage College in Troy, NY

  American interventions have consumed billions of dollars and cost thousands of lives over the past decade.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson — a Republican from the 19th district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that there is another way.

    When Hitler’s armies occupied Italy in 1943, they also seized control of mankind’s greatest cultural treasures. As they had done throughout Europe, the Nazis could now plunder the masterpieces of the Renaissance, the treasures of the Vatican, and the antiquities of the Roman Empire. 

Robert Edsel joins us to talk about the efforts to save Italy’s great artistic treasures from the Nazis. 

His book is Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis.

    In his new book, Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks That Saved the Nation, veteran reporter Steve Vogel tells the gripping story of the burning of Washington and the improbable last stand at Baltimore that helped save the nation and inspired its National Anthem.

Listener Essay - The Retreat

May 23, 2013

   Dan New is a combat Vietnam Veteran and an artist who loves to write and photograph as expression of his life.

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