watershed

Federal Funding Heads Toward NY Watersheds

Jan 15, 2015
Daniel Case

New York’s two U.S. senators Wednesday announced federal funding for projects in New York watersheds. 

While most New Yorkers don't pay much attention to the water levels in Lake Ontario, one environmental organization says it is among the most important issues now facing the region. It is called plan 2014, and it's being promoted by the New York arm of the Nature Conservancy. Stu Gruskin is the chief conservation and external affairs officer for the Nature Conservancy.

Patrick Stahl, flickr

A New York Congressman whose district includes the West-of-the-Hudson New York City watershed is weighing in on draft revisions to the city’s waiver from filtering drinking water. 

Doug Tone, flickr

The New York State Department of Health has not scheduled any public hearings since releasing in August a draft document that would continue to allow upstate water headed for New York City faucets to avoid filtration. A group of Ulster County legislators says it will hold its own public hearing, to compile comments on the controversial subject.

Photo by Jelson25

The results of a 30-year study show the striking evidence of change in the water of Lake George.

Recently, at the annual meeting of the FUND for Lake George, a group dedicated protecting the natural resources and habitats of Lake George, it was announced that the lake was getting saltier.

WAMC

Water quality in the Schoharie Valley and the Catskill Watershed has captured the attention of environmentalists and government officials who have joined forces to develop procedures and policies for dealing with "the new normal" climate change seems to have cast across upstate New York.

21 state, county and municipal leaders have signed a letter calling on New York State to fine New York City 13-point-5 million dollars for sending turbid waters into the Lower Esopus Creek... Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports.

The 21 leaders sent a letter to the State Department of Environmental Conservation, which must decide whether to allow the releases of muddy water to go on...  those opposed to the releases argue they damage ecosystems in the Lower Esopus and hinder business and recreational opportunities for communities situated along the Creek.

For decades Citizen Scientists have helped  answer serious scientific questions and provide researchers in various fields with vital data that may otherwise have gone uncollected and never catalogued.As Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports, one New York State agency has rolled out a program that depends on ordinary people to sign up and participate:

Watershed Update

May 22, 2012

The vast New York City Watershed area has taken a prominent spot in the
public eye thanks to the 2011 floods AND the hydrofracking issue.
Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports the watershed is
experiencing a burst of activity...

The 70-thousand acre watershed system employs a combination of tunnels,
aqueducts and reservoirs to meet the New York City 's daily need for
fresh water.