welfare

  The Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy (SCAA) is a leading statewide policy analysis and advocacy organization working to shape policies to improve health, welfare, and human services for all New Yorkers, especially those who are disenfranchised.

Kate Breslin is the President & CEO of the Schuyler Center. The Schuyler Center’s mission is to build upon its long history as a strong, independent voice and coalition-builder that holds government accountable and helps to shape public debates around social policies that affect New Yorkers.

Kate has spent her career analyzing and advocating in support of policy solutions that improve the lives of people in the US and abroad.

Stephen Gottlieb: Who We Work To Support

Sep 29, 2015

We've all seen bumper stickers that complain, "I work so welfare queens don't have to" and other complaints about taking care of people in need. Conservatives, Republicans, Tea Partiers all tell us the problem is “entitlements.” And people are mad. They do not want to work to pay for other people's entitlements.

Which Presidential candidate called for “high sustained economic growth where more people can have earned success?” and in what year?  No, it was not Bill Clinton in 1992.  No, it was not Barack Obama in 2012.  It was Jeb Bush in a sit-down with Sean Hannity during the CPAC conference.  (For details see http://reason.com/blog/2015/02/27/jeb-bush-defends-himself-on-common-core )

Billy Brown, flickr

Massachusetts lawmakers in the Berkshires are the latest politicians participating in a national anti-hunger campaign to raise awareness about what people on the Federal Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program face. 

The entire Berkshire statehouse delegation, including Representative Gail Cariddi of North Adams, Representative Paul Mark of Peru, Representative Tricia Farley-Bouvier of Pittsfield, Representative William “Smitty” Pignatelli of Lenox, and State Senator Benjamin Downing of Pittsfield, are all currently undertaking the so-called “SNAP challenge.”

WAMC

The man in charge of administering much of the social services system in Massachusetts is trying to live for a week on a food budget equal to what is provided by a federal assistance program.  It is part of a national campaign by anti-hunger groups to highlight the importance of the program at a time when it is threatened with deep cuts.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Massachusetts Interim Commissioner of the state Department of Transitional Assistance visited Pittsfield last night as part of a statewide campaign seeking public input on how to improve integrity and client services in the Commonwealth.

DTA Interim Commissioner Stacey Monahan stopped in Pittsfield Wednesday evening as just one several stops she is making soliciting comments from community members across the state. At the end of the multi-city tour, a report with all the information will be submitted to the legislature and Governor’s office for consideration.

In the wake of a report released earlier this year by the Massachusetts Inspector General suggesting that $25 million may be wasted in the welfare system annually, and following the resignation of former Commissioner of the Department of Transitional Assistance Daniel Curley, recently-appointed Interim Commissioner Stacey Monahan is touring the Bay State holding a series of listening sessions to hear feedback and suggestions from the public on how to improve the DTA system.

The meeting will be held this evening beginning at 6 pm at the Pittsfield Public Library.

A recent report released by the Inspector General of Massachusetts claims that the state’s welfare system could be paying out up to $25 million in fraudulent benefits.

A document released this week by state Inspector General Glenn Cunha studied eligibility information from those benefitting from the state and federally funded Transitional Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. The cash assistance program is overseen by the state Department of Transitional Assistance.

  As the Massachusetts House is set to begin debate today on a proposed $32 billion state budget for the fiscal year that begins in July, anti poverty activists are decrying proposals they claim will erode the social safety net.  WAMC'S Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.