Joe Pickett, the Wyoming game warden and unassuming lawman who graces C.J. Box’s #1 New York Times bestselling series of western crime novels, returns in a riveting eighteenth installment, "The Disappeared."

Having won every major prize in the crime fiction genre, including the Edgar, Anthony, Macavity, Gumshoe, and Barry awards, and with over ten million copies of his novels sold in the U.S. alone, C.J. Box is an acknowledged master at honing unforgettable characters and un-put-downable plots.

It's one of the most revered movies of Hollywood's golden era. Starring screen legend Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in her first significant film role, High Noon was shot on a lean budget over just thirty-two days but achieved instant box-office and critical success. It won four Academy Awards in 1953, including a best actor win for Cooper. And it became a cultural touchstone, often cited by politicians as a favorite film, celebrating moral fortitude.

Yet what has been often overlooked is that High Noon was made during the height of the Hollywood blacklist, a time of political inquisition and personal betrayal. In the middle of the film shoot, screenwriter Carl Foreman was forced to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his former membership in the Communist Party.

In "High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic," Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel tells the story of the making of a great American Western, exploring how Carl Foreman's concept of High Noon evolved from idea to first draft to final script, taking on allegorical weight. Both the classic film and its turbulent political times emerge newly illuminated.

  Robert Knott is an actor, writer, and producer and a few years ago he was chosen by the Estate of author Robert B. Parker to carry on the Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch series of western novels.

Knott’s list of stage, television, and film credits include the feature film Appaloosa based on the Robert B. Parker novel which he adapted and produced with actor and producer Ed Harris. Also among his credits is the television mini-series The Stand based on the Stephen King novel. He also had roles in The Coneheads, Pollack and The Garage.

His new novel in the Cole and Hitch series is Robert B. Parker’s The Bridge.

    Elmore Leonard, who died Tuesday at age 87 from complications from a recent stroke, influenced an entire generation of crime writers with his gritty crime novels and shoot-'em up Westerns. Works like “Get Shorty,” “Freaky Deaky” and “Glitz” established him as a modern master of American genre writing. His novels were often adapted for the large and small screen, including a short story, “Fire in the Hole” which was adapted for television as the FX show “Justified” which won a Peabody Award in 2011 in its second season.

Joe Donahue speaking with Elmore Leonard on the occasion of the publication of Leonard’s 10 Rules of Writing. We re-air a portion of that interview in memoriam.

    The very popular Virgil Cole western series by Robert B. Parker has been resurrected three years after the author’s death by newcomer, Robert Knott.

In Ironhorse, Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch - newly appointed as Territorial Marshalls - find themselves traveling by train through the Indian Territories.