women

For decades, actress and director Christine Lahti has captivated the hearts and minds of her audience through iconic roles in "Chicago Hope," "Running on Empty," "Housekeeping," "And Justice for All," "Swing Shift," "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," "God of Carnage," and "The Blacklist." Now, in "True Stories from an Unreliable Eyewitness," this acclaimed performer channels her creativity inward to share her own story for the first time on the page.

In this poignant essay collection, Lahti focuses on three major periods of her life: her childhood, her early journey as an actress and activist, and the realities of her life as a middle-aged woman in Hollywood today.

Leadership expert Sally Helgesen and bestselling leadership coach Marshall Goldsmith have trained thousands of high achievers to reach even greater heights. Again and again, they see that women face specific and different roadblocks from men as they advance in the workplace. In fact, the very habits that helped women early in their careers can hinder them as they move up. Simply put, what got you here won't get you there, and you might not even realize your blind spots until it's too late.

Their new book: "How Women Rise: Break the 12 Habits Holding You Back from Your Next Raise, Promotion, or Job" is essential reading for any woman who is ready to advance to the next level.

This afternoon there is a Saratoga County Chamber of Commerce Event with Sally Helgesen at Embassy Suites Saratoga at 4 p.m. co-hosted by Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga.

Andrea Barnet’s new book "Visionary Women" tells the story of four visionaries who profoundly shaped the world we live in today. Together, these women, linked not by friendship or field but by their choice to break with convention, showed what one person speaking truth to power can do.

Jane Jacobs fought for livable cities and strong communities; Rachel Carson warned us about poisoning the environment; Jane Goodall demonstrated the indelible kinship between humans and animals; and Alice Waters urged us to reconsider what and how we eat.

Barnet traces the arc of each woman’s career and explores how their work collectively changed the course of history.

Whether married, single, widowed, divorced, with children or without, at some point women inevitably ask the question, "What's next for me?"

Amy Nobile and Trisha Ashworth create a road map for how to embrace and thrive in this new phase of life in their book, "Just When You’re Comfortable in Your Own Skin, It Starts to Sag: Rewriting the Rules to Midlife."

Rachel Simmons is the author of "Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives," and the New York Times bestsellers "Odd Girl Out and "The Curse of the Good Girl."

As an educator, Rachel teaches girls and women skills to build their resilience, amplify their voices, and own their courage so that they live with integrity and health.

Kristin Hannah’s best-selling novel “The Nightingale” illuminated the women of the French resistance in World War II. Her new novel “The Great Alone” focuses on fiercely independent women in extraordinarily difficult circumstances in Alaska who must fight each day to survive.

Using a trove of footage unearthed from the National Geographic archives, the new documentary film "Jane" tells the true story of Jane Goodall as a young woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time and revolutionized our understanding of the natural world.

Filmmaker Brett Morgen joins us. Dubbed the “mad scientist” of documentary film by the New York Times, Brett Morgen has been directing, writing, and producing ground breaking documentary films for the past 15 years.

Artwork for book "Broad Band"
clairelevans.com

The history of technology you probably know is one of men and machines, garages and riches, alpha nerds and “brogrammers.” But female visionaries have always been at the vanguard of technology and innovation.

In fact, women turn up at the very beginning of every important wave in technology. They may have been hidden in plain sight, their inventions and contributions touching our lives in ways we don't even realize, but they have always been part of the story.

VICE reporter and YACHT lead singer Claire Evans gives these female heroes their due in her new book: "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet."

This Women’s History Month, as we witness the huge volume of female candidates running in 2018, the hundreds of thousands marching at the Women’s Marches across the country, we focus on the women who demanded and fought damn hard for their rights.

Journalist Elaine Weiss’ The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote rediscovers the powerful and inspiring story of American women rising up to claim their rights, as their long fight for the vote reaches its climax. 

Colson Whitehead’s novel "The Underground Railroad," tells the story of a runaway slave and re-imagines the pre-Civil War South. It won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book award and it is now out in paperback.

Women Against War will present International Coordinator for Women Cross the DMZ, Christine Ahn, at the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany on Saturday, February 10 at 7 p.m. Her talk is entitled "Defusing the US-North Korea Conflict: Building on the Olympic Truce."

Ahn organized the 2015 Women’s March across the Korean DMZ, including Nobel Peace Laureates, women from North and South Korea and peace activists from across the world-including Medea Benjamin and Ann Wright from the US. Participants continue to advocate with global policy makers for a peaceful settlement. She is now leading a women’s peace delegation to the January 16th Forum of Foreign Ministers from 20 Countries in Vancouver, Canada.

Sexual harassment and gender discrimination have been met with a grassroots response in the #MeToo moment. In this climate, WNYC is presenting "Beyond #MeToo," four one-hour conversations focused on what we need to do as a society to remedy widespread sexual harassment.

The four-part broadcast will cover the workplace, corrective responses, how we are raising and educating our children in this environment and how men can play a role in the solution.

The guests and their perspectives will be extremely broad and diverse. Listeners can expect to hear from teens and parents, politicians and artists, corporate leaders and blue-collar workers.

The series will air from January 23-26 at 11AM during the Roundtable next week. Jami Floyd is the Host Of "All Things Considered” for WNYC Radio and will be hosting the first night of four national roundtables called “Beyond #MeToo.” She joins us with a preview. 

The series will air from January 23-26 at 11AM during The Roundtable next week. 

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we focus on the St. Paul’s Center in Rensselaer. They have provided shelter and support services for over 11 years to more than 2,300 mothers and children who are without a place to call home. Over the last three years, they have expanded services to include rapid rehousing and scattered site permanent supportive housing, allowing them to serve even more families in more impactful ways. Tracy Picher is the executive director.

On November 3rd, The YWCA of the Greater Capital Region and The Arts Center of the Capital Region will present the 3rd Annual BraVa! Fundraiser. The event will showcase local artists reading poems, songs, monologues and essays on the topic of bras in their lives. Last year’s event featured twelve talented writers from around the Capital Region whose pieces touched on the subject of bras from many viewpoints which ranged from the poignant to the hilarious. More than 500 bras were collected last year and were provided to those in need at the YWCA and throughout the greater capital region.

BraVa! was founded by author, editor and educator, Marian Roach Smith. She joins us today along with Daquetta Jones, the executive director of the YWCA


  Singer-songwriter and visual artist, Natalia Zuckerman, will perform at Helsinki Hudson this Sunday, October 22nd as part of The Rogovoy Salon.

 

Zuckerman’s parents are renowned musicians, flutist Eugenia Zuckerman and violinist Pinchas Zuckerman. Natalia is a whiz with most things string: including acoustic and electric guitar, slide guitar, dobro, lap steel and banjo.

 

Her performance at Club Helsinki, The Women Who Rode Away: Songs and Portraits, will feature visual art alongside portrait songs about and inspired by women.

Michele Goodwin
http://www.michelebgoodwin.com

Upper Hudson Planned Parenthood’s Women’s Leadership Circle Luncheon takes place tomorrow and Michele Goodwin will be the featured speaker.  

She is Professor at the University of California, Irvine and is the founder and director of the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy and its internationally praised for her Reproductive Justice Initiative. She is an expert on reproductive justice, health and human rights and body autonomy. 

Susan Burton is the founder and executive director of A New Way of Life, a nonprofit that provides sober housing and other support to formerly incarcerated women. She is nationally known as an advocate for restoring basic civil and human rights to those who have served time. Burton was a winner of AARP’s prestigious Purpose Prize and has been a Starbucks® “Upstander,” a CNN Top 10 Hero, a Soros Justice Fellow, and a Women’s Policy Institute Fellow at the California Wellness Foundation.

She is the co-author, with Cari Lynn, of Becoming Ms. Burton


  This Thursday at 4 p.m., The Mount in Lenox, Massachusetts presents Women Writing Through Loss: Connecting Through Calamity featuring Dr. Lucy Kalanithi, Rebecca Soffer, and Emily Rapp Black as they read from their work and discuss the power of connection as friends, as writers, as mothers, and as women who forged powerful friendships after experiencing great personal loss, and writing their way out of it.

 

Rebecca Soffer joined us to tell us more.

Thousands of pregnant women pass through our nation’s jails every year. What happens to them as they carry their pregnancies in a space of punishment? In this time when the public safety net is frayed, incarceration has become a central and racialized strategy for managing the poor.

In her book Jailcare, Carolyn Sufrin explores how jail has, paradoxically, become a place where women can find care. Carolyn Sufrin is a medical anthropologist and an obstetrician-gynecologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Good Men Wanted at Vassar and New York Stage and Film's Powerhouse Theatre
Buck Lewis

Vassar College and New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theatre’s second mainstage show this summer is Good Men Wanted. The new play is about women who - for varied reasons and to varied ends - disguised themselves as men to fight in the Civil War.

The drama punctuated by explosive dance sequences - choreographed by Ani Taj and set to contemporary pop music. They play is written by Kevin Armento and directed by Jaki Bradley who joins us.


  The new documentary STEP shares the story of three young women in the first graduating class at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and their experiences with school, their families, boyfriends, friends, and their Step team.

 

Pushed to succeed by devoted teachers, teammates, counselors, coaches and themselves, they chase their dreams: to win a step championship and to be accepted into college.

 

STEP which won the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Inspirational Filmmaking at Sundance this year, will have its Massachusetts premiere as the opening night film at the Berkshire International Film Festival -- screening tonight at 6pm at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington.

 

The film is directed by Amanda Lipitz who joins us.

Linda Hirshman
Nina Subin

Close Encounters with Music is presenting Linda Hirshman and The Feminine Mystique at The Mount in Lenox this coming Sunday at 3 p.m. It is part of their series: Conversations With - intimate and stimulating conversations about music and ideas.

Lawyer, best-selling author, and cultural historian Linda Hirshman has chronicled battles that have changed the social landscape of America in her books Get to Work: A Manifesto For Women of the World, Hard Bargains: The Politics of Sex, and others.

Hirshman will analyze the 14th and 19th Amendments in tandem as two paths to equality in the suffrage effort and as they affected private and public lives of women. 

Can one person know another person? How do we live through other people? Is it possible to fill the gap between people? If not, can art fill that gap?

Grappling with these questions, David Shields gives us Other People: Takes & Mistakes, a book that is something of a revelation: seventy-plus essays, written over the last thirty-five years, reconceived and recombined to form neither a miscellany nor a memoir but a sustained meditation on otherness. The book is divided into five sections: Men, Women, Athletes, Performers, Alter Egos.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers - speaking about the two women who inspired Symphonie Fantastique by Hector Berlioz.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. Today’s composer is Felix Mendelssohn.

Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. You will read about men who were political leaders and men who were activists and cultural tastemakers. These men have been lauded for generations for creating the most exciting and influential city in the world.

But that's not the whole story.

The Women Who Made New York by Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made New York City the cultural epicenter of the world.

Julie Scelfo will be at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck on March 1.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. This week’s composer is Ludwig van Beethoven.

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. This week’s composer is Ludwig van Beethoven.

Weren’t women supposed to have “arrived”? Perhaps with the nation’s first female President, equal pay on the horizon, true diversity in the workplace to come thereafter? Or, at least the end of “fat-shaming” and “locker room talk”? 

Well, we aren’t quite there yet. But does that mean that progress for women in business has come to a screeching halt?  It’s true that the old rules didn’t get us as far as we hoped. But we can go the distance, and we can close the gaps that still exist. We just need a new way.

In fact, there are many reasons to be optimistic about the future, says former Wall Street powerhouse-turned-entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck.  That’s because the business world is changing fast –driven largely by technology - and it’s changing in ways that give women more power and opportunities than ever.

Her new book is - Own It: The Power of Women at Work

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