women

WAMC/Pat Bradley

On Wednesday, June 1st, 2016, the International Center of the Capital Region, in conjunction with Global Ties U.S. and the U.S. Department of State, will be hosting a Women’s Empowerment Diplomacy summit in Albany.

  The second annual SUNY Ulster OWN IT! Entrepreneurial Women’s Conference will be held on Thursday, June 2, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the College Lounge of Vanderlyn Hall on the Stone Ridge, New York SUNY Ulster campus.

This conference for women entrepreneurs and ‘dream-to-be entrepreneurs’ features nationally recognized speakers and hands-on workshops presented by regional experts.

The keynote speaker is Silda Wall Spitzer, Founder and CEO of woman-owned New York States of Mind, a digital magazine and marketplace that creates a new intellectual and economic platform for people, places, products and ideas in New York State; Principal at NewWorld Capital Group, a private equity firm investing in environmental opportunities, including energy efficiency, clean energy, water, waste-to-value and environmental services; and former first lady of New York State.

We are joined by Silda Wall Spitzer and Mindy Kole, Assistant Professor of Business and Director of The Darlene L. Pfeiffer Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at SUNY Ulster. 

  Women are making inroads in business, but still have a long way to go.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about her latest work on this issue. 

  The Musicians of Ma'alwyck will be presenting a special collaborative concert this Sunday with the Siena College Chorus and Chamber Singers under the direction of Dr. Timothy Reno celebrating the Suffragettes and the bicentennial of the birth of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Titled a "Declaration of Sentiments," the concert will feature works of American female composers Marion Bauer, Amy Beach, and Daybreak of English composer, Rebecca Clarke. They will also present the world premiere of a work based on Suffragette texts by Kathleen Ballantyne.

The event will be held at Druthers Brewery on Broadway in Albany. We welcome: Ann-Marie Barker Schwartz, Director of Musicians of Ma'alwyck and Jennifer Dorsey who heads the McCormick Center at Siena College.

  Debbie Macomber has been dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

She has 200 million books in print; the newest, A Girl’s Guide to Moving On, is about a mother and her daughter-in-law who both leave their respective troubled marriages and lean on each other while starting over.

  Upstate New York Women In Film & Television (UPWIFT) and The Linda WAMC’s Performing Arts Studio, will present a screening of the film, Racing Daylight on Friday, March 18th, at 8:00 p.m. The event will feature a conversation with director Nicole Quinn afterward. The movie is part of the Reel Women in Film series sponsored by UPWIFT and The Linda.

Racing Daylight was filmed in the Hudson Valley and features Oscar award-winning Ulster County resident Melissa Leo as well as Oscar nominated actor David Straithairn. It is a ghost story, a murder mystery and a love story which crosses time.

Nicole Quinn joins us.

Photo of Piper Kerman
Brian Bowen Smith

  Piper Kerman was a 24 year old Smith College graduate in 1993 when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord. This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with the woman involved in a drug smuggling ring and got Kerman got involved too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

Five years later she was named as part of the drug ring and in February 2008 she reported to the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Connecticut. Kerman’s memoir Orange is the New Black: My Year in Women’s Prison inspired the award winning Netflix television series of the same name. She will deliver the Alex Krieger Memorial Lecture at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie on Tuesday February 9th.

  For more than a decade, Katherine Zoepf has lived in or traveled throughout the Arab world, reporting on the lives of women, whose role in the region has never been more in flux. Only a generation ago, female adolescence as we know it in the West did not exist in the Middle East. There were only children and married women.

  In eighteenth-century America, information about a woman’s life and accomplishments was very difficult to discover, but some woman were avid letter writers or devoted journal keepers, and thankfully some of those letters and journals were saved.

In her new book, Remarkable Women of New England: Daughters, Wives, Sisters, and Mothers: The War Years 1754 to 1787, Carole Owens tells the story of Mary Gray Bidwell, Elizabeth Edwards Burr; Lavinia Deane Fisk, Abigail Williams Sergeant Dwight and others.

The war years changed the lives of each of these women and their lives changed our new country.

  Tina Packer is one of the country’s foremost experts on Shakespeare and theatre arts and now the actor, director, and master teacher offers an exploration of the women of Shakespeare’s plays in her new book: Women of Will: Following the Feminine in Shakespeare's Plays.

  Julius Caesar, a beautiful and popular girl from a wealthy family has been selected as the ‘face’ of Rome Preparatory Academy, an elite all girls boarding school. She will be the president of the student council and represent the school at both fund raising and social events, including Homecoming, over which she will preside as queen. Although well liked, Caesar's sense of entitlement and hubris are resented by other students. ---- If that sounds familiar but some the details seem new – you’re keeping up with us just fine.

The Theatre Department at SUNY New Paltz is staging a production of William Shakepeare’s Julius Caesar set in a girls’ boarding school.

This re-imagining of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar asks the audience to consider violence on a more personal level by eliminating the safe distance of history and putting the weapons in the hands of young people.

  In Getting Screwed: Sex Workers and the Law, Alison Bass weaves the true stories of sex workers with the latest research on prostitution into a gripping journalistic account of how women (and some men) navigate a culture that routinely accepts the implicit exchange of sex for money, status, or even a good meal, but imposes heavy penalties on those who make such bargains explicit.

Along the way, Bass examines why an increasing number of middle-class white women choose to become sex workers and explores how prostitution has become a thriving industry in the twenty-first-century global economy. Situating her book in American history more broadly, she also discusses the impact of the sexual revolution, the rise of the Nevada brothels, and the growing war on sex trafficking after 9/11.

In their number one New York Times best seller Half the Sky, husband-and-wife team Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn brought to light struggles faced by women and girls around the globe, and showcased individuals and institutions working to address oppression and expand opportunity.

  In their latest book, now in paperback, A Path Appears  is a sweeping tapestry of people who are making the world a better place. The book is also a guide to the ways that we can do the same—whether with a donation of $5 or $5 mil­lion, with our time, by capitalizing on our skills as individuals, or by using the resources of our businesses.

Kristof and WuDunn, husband and wife, have co-authored three previous books: Half the SkyThunder from the East, and China Wakes. They were awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1990 for their coverage of China and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement in 2009.

The Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy will host a breakfast with Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn on Thursday October 29, in Albany. 

  This morning we will learn about a first-of-its-kind event to benefit female residents of the YWCA of the Greater Capital Region, based in Troy. The Arts Center will be hosting “Brava!” a fundraiser seeking to provide new bras to women at the YWCA.

  In 2008, on her second night of college, Aspen Matis was raped by a fellow student. Shattered and alone, she fled to the Mexican border to begin the 2,650 mile walk along the Pacific Crest Trail, through the unforgiving desert and mountains to Canada.

Reminiscent of Alice Sebold’s - Lucky and Cheryl Strayed’s - Wild, Matis has written a searing, yet hopeful story of survival in the wake of a horrific trauma and finding acceptance, hope, and healing in nature.

Girl In The Woods is a memoir of how Aspen’s horror became her salvation…and, yes, she found her future husband by the 2,000 mile mark.

  In her new story collection, Almost Famous Women, writer Megan Mayhew Bergman takes us into the lives of independent, inventive women at the margins of history.

Bergman has written fictionalized accounts of real-life, risk-taking women who have largely been forgotten.

  Sara Paretsky revolutionized the mystery world in 1982 with the introduction of private eye V.I. Warshawski in Indemnity Only. V.I. – tough, credible, street-smart, and feminine – challenged the stereotypes of women in fiction as victims or vamps and Paretsky made it possible for a new generation of crime writers to thrive.

In her new novel, Brush Back, Paretsky continues to use real-world issues to fuel her prose, when V.I. Warshawski confronts crooked politicians and buried secrets from her own Chicago past.

Like her celebrated protagonist, Sara Paretsky is a crusader for social justice and an advocate for those on society’s margins. Paretsky is currently president of the Mystery Writers of America.

  Local professional women supporting each other – that’s the mission of Women@Work – a bimonthly magazine devoted to helping women managers and executives navigate the world of work.

The Times Union publication also presents networking events and their next “Connect Event” is this Sunday, July 26th.  “Conquering the Dream: Champion Polo Player Sunny Hale Shares Her Story” at Greenfield Center from 3 to 5pm.

We are joined now by Jennifer Gish, Senior Editor of Women@Work magazine and Tracy Ormsbee, Executive Editor of the Times Union magazines.

  We hear from some women on the Congressional Corner – but not many.

In today’s segment, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Congress could use more.

  The Emmy-award winning Orange is the New Black, based on Piper Kerman’s memoir of the same name, depicts her arrest, conviction and incarceration for drug-trafficking. The show’s third season premieres tomorrow.

But the book and Netflix series are from only Kerman’s perspective. Now, Cleary Wolters, the real life Alex Vause and Piper's former drug-smuggling lover, tells her side of the story in a new book, Out of Orange.

  Tina Packer is one of the world's leading authorities on Shakespeare's work and the Founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA.

She'll be delivering the 19th Annual Burian Lecture on April 13th at SUNY Albany, sponsored by the Department of Theatre and co-sponsored by the NYS Writers Institute. In the lecture she'll discuss her new book, Women of Will: The Feminine in Shakespeare’s Plays

   In the summer of 2009, as she was covering the uprisings in Tehran for the New York Times, Iranian journalist Nazila Fathi received a phone call. “They have given your photo to snipers,” a government source warned her. Soon after, with undercover agents closing in, Fathi fled the country with her husband and two children, beginning a life of exile.

In The Lonely War, Fathi interweaves her story with that of the country she left behind, showing how Iran is locked in a battle between hardliners and reformers that dates back to the country’s 1979 revolution. Fathi was nine years old when that uprising replaced the Iranian shah with a radical Islamic regime.

Women Against War has brought Nazila Fathi to the Albany area to speak about Iran and about growing up in Iran and pursuing a career as a journalist reporting from Tehran. She will speak at Siena College from 4:30 – 6 PM today. The lecture will take place in the Kuhn Boland Room in Building #15 on the Siena Map.

Rafia Zakaria is an author, attorney and human rights activist who has worked on behalf of victims of domestic violence around the world.

Her new book, The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan, tells the parallel stories of her family and country, while guiding the reader through the complicated aftermath of Pakistan’s shift toward a more conservative culture. Through her intimate and nuanced portrayal of Pakistani family life, Zakaria emphasizes the often unheard female voices of her country and uses her personal story to serve as a metaphor for Pakistan’s complex political state.

  International Women's Day is a holiday with millions of people participating in thousands of events around the world for 104 years - and celebrated annually by the United Nations. Four years ago two Saratoga residents set out to honor the day and its history with the first NY Celebrates Women statewide event.

One Woman. One World. will be held in Saratoga Springs on International Women’s Day, March 8th.

Ruth Fein and Joanne Yepsen are partners in Critical Needs Now, who work primarily with not-for-profits and together produce this event. Joanne is also, of course, the Mayor of Saratoga Springs.

  This year’s month-long Berkshire Festival of Women Writers kicks of on Sunday, March 1st.

Berkshire Festival of Women Writers a collaborative, multi-venue event sponsored by Bard College at Simon’s Rock with many local partners, celebrated during March – which is of course Women’s History Month. This is the festivals Fifth Anniversary Season and includes an exciting line-up of readings, lectures, workshops, performances and screenings by women writers from the Berkshire region.

Dr. Jennifer Browdy is the Founding Director of the festival and she joins us.

  For decades, women battered the walls of the male fortress of television journalism. After fierce struggles, three women—Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, and Christiane Amanpour—broke into the newsroom’s once impenetrable “boys’ club.”

These extraordinary women were not simply pathbreakers, but wildly gifted journalists whose unique talents—courage and empathy, competitive drive and strategic poise—enabled them to climb to the top of the corporate ladder and transform the way Americans received their news.

Sheila Weller's new book is The News Sorority: Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Christiane Amanpour—and the (Ongoing, Imperfect, Complicated) Triumph of Women in TV News.

  In Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War, Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little known aspects of the Civil War - the stories of four courageous women - a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow - who were spies.

  After years of research as a psychologist and consultant for women struggling in the professional world, Dr. Stacey Radin made a groundbreaking realization: it all begins in middle school. Women who become successful leaders learn how to do so in the middle grades—the most formative stage in a girl’s development and self-identification.

Unleashed is a social justice program that empowers adolescent girls to recognize their power, learn to embrace it, and use it effectively by taking a stand against an injustice they are passionate about, and advocating for animal rights and welfare in the process.

We speak with Dr. Radin about Unleashed and her book, Brave Girls: Raising Young Women With Passion And Purpose To Become Powerful Leaders.

  Forty years after the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling, “abortion” is still a word that is said with outright hostility by many, despite the fact that one in three American women will have terminated at least one pregnancy by menopause. Even those who support a woman’s right to an abortion often qualify their support by saying abortion is a “bad thing,” an “agonizing decision,” making the medical procedure so remote and radioactive that it takes it out of the world of the everyday, turning an act that is normal and necessary into something shameful and secretive.

In Pro, Katha Pollitt takes on the personhood argument, reaffirms the priority of a woman’s life and health, and discusses why terminating a pregnancy can be a force for good for women, families, and society.

This week in our Ideas Matter segment, we feature MASS Humanities and are joined by Harley Erdman, Professor of Theater at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Her new play, Nobody's Girl, will have its premiere at the Academy of Music Theatre in Northampton, MA on October 17th and is based on real events that occurred at the Academy of Music in the early 1940s.

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