women

Linda Hirshman
Nina Subin

Close Encounters with Music is presenting Linda Hirshman and The Feminine Mystique at The Mount in Lenox this coming Sunday at 3 p.m. It is part of their series: Conversations With - intimate and stimulating conversations about music and ideas.

Lawyer, best-selling author, and cultural historian Linda Hirshman has chronicled battles that have changed the social landscape of America in her books Get to Work: A Manifesto For Women of the World, Hard Bargains: The Politics of Sex, and others.

Hirshman will analyze the 14th and 19th Amendments in tandem as two paths to equality in the suffrage effort and as they affected private and public lives of women. 

Can one person know another person? How do we live through other people? Is it possible to fill the gap between people? If not, can art fill that gap?

Grappling with these questions, David Shields gives us Other People: Takes & Mistakes, a book that is something of a revelation: seventy-plus essays, written over the last thirty-five years, reconceived and recombined to form neither a miscellany nor a memoir but a sustained meditation on otherness. The book is divided into five sections: Men, Women, Athletes, Performers, Alter Egos.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers - speaking about the two women who inspired Symphonie Fantastique by Hector Berlioz.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. Today’s composer is Felix Mendelssohn.

Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. You will read about men who were political leaders and men who were activists and cultural tastemakers. These men have been lauded for generations for creating the most exciting and influential city in the world.

But that's not the whole story.

The Women Who Made New York by Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made New York City the cultural epicenter of the world.

Julie Scelfo will be at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck on March 1.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. This week’s composer is Ludwig van Beethoven.

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. This week’s composer is Ludwig van Beethoven.

Weren’t women supposed to have “arrived”? Perhaps with the nation’s first female President, equal pay on the horizon, true diversity in the workplace to come thereafter? Or, at least the end of “fat-shaming” and “locker room talk”? 

Well, we aren’t quite there yet. But does that mean that progress for women in business has come to a screeching halt?  It’s true that the old rules didn’t get us as far as we hoped. But we can go the distance, and we can close the gaps that still exist. We just need a new way.

In fact, there are many reasons to be optimistic about the future, says former Wall Street powerhouse-turned-entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck.  That’s because the business world is changing fast –driven largely by technology - and it’s changing in ways that give women more power and opportunities than ever.

Her new book is - Own It: The Power of Women at Work

The Women’s March on Washington is a grassroots effort comprised of dozens of independent coordinators at the state level. The effort is helmed by four national co-chairs and a national coordinating committee who are working around the clock to pull it all together.

Sister Marches and other solidarity events are taking place all over the country – and the world -- and we’ll learn about one in The Berkshires today.

A steering committee including Kristen van Ginhoven, co-founder and Artistic Director of WAM Theatre, and community members Jayne Benjulian, Lynn Festa and Mary Lincoln, are organizing a free event this Saturday from 10 am-2 pm at The Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, MA.

Jayne Benjulian and Kristen van Ginhoven join us to tell us more.

Alice Guy-Blaché was the first female film director and the first film studio owner. She made her first film, by her own account, in 1896 at age 23. She went on to write, direct, or produce more than 1,000 films.

Upstate Women in Film and Television (UPWIFT) will present a selection of films by Alice Guy-Blaché at the Rosendale Theater in Rosendale, NY on Wednesday, November 30th; at The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday, December 2nd; and at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on Sunday, December 11th.

Part of the presentations will be a Skype Q&A with producer and director Pamela Green, who is currently making a feature full-length documentary film about Alice Guy-Blaché for which she has been conducting extensive research for the past five years.

Pamela Green joins us now along with Hanna Sawka, President of UPWIFT.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their conversation about female composers - focusing on Nadia and Lili Boulanger.

Music - a portion of Lili Boulanger’s Psalm 130 - Du fond de l’amibe recorded by  American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Bostein.


  To Keep the Light is written and directed by Erica Fae, who also stars as Abbie -- the wife of a lighthouse keeper in Northern Maine in the late 1800s. Inspired by true stories of women lighthouse keepers, working in isolation and under extreme conditions, women who inherited their jobs from infirm or deceased husbands or fathers and were trailblazers, embodying feminism long before the word existed.

The film will screen twice at the Woodstock Film Festival - today at 1:30 at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck, NY and Sunday at 2:15 at Upstate Films in Woodstock.

Caroline Shaw wrote the score for To Keep The Light. Shaw is a Grammy-winning singer in Roomful of Teeth and a violinist in ACME (American Contemporary Music Ensemble). In 2013 she became the youngest ever winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music, for her composition Partita for 8 Voices. Recent and current projects include commissions for the the Cincinnati Symphony, the Guggenheim Museum Works & Process Series, and the Folger Library, as well as collaborations with Kanye West.   

Amber Tamblyn’s directorial debut, Paint it Black, will screen twice at the Woodstock Film Festival - tonight at 6:30 at the Woodstock Playhouse in Woodstock and Sunday at the Orpheum Theatre in Saugerties at 5:30 p.m. She will also participate in the festival’s "Women in Film and Media" panel on Saturday October 15 at the Kleinert James Art Center in Woodstock. Other participants in the panel are Bette Gordon, Catherine Hardwicke, and Mary Stewart Masterson. The panel is moderated by Thelma Adams.

Based on the novel of the same name by Janet Fitch, Paint it Black explores and explodes the confusion of grief when Josie’s boyfriend, Michael, commits suicide and his death brings her into the orbit of his powerful and powerfully cold and heartbroken mother, Meredith. Their strained relationship circling around who knew Michael better, who loved him more, and what can they get from - and do to - each other now that he is gone.

Tamblyn co-wrote the adaptation with Ed Dougherty. It stars Alia Shawkat as Josie and Janet McTeer as Meredith.

The 2nd Annual Brava, a fundraiser that will provide new bras to women at the YWCA and those in need in the community, will be held on Friday, November 4, 2016 at The Arts Center of the Capital Region in Troy from 5:00-7:30 p.m.

The Arts Center is a partner in the event which will feature 8 to 10 talented writers from around the region who will read jury-selected poems and essays or perform songs and monologues on the subject of brassieres in their lives. The pieces will touch on the subject of bras from many viewpoints and range from the poignant to the hilarious. (Submission information here. Must be received by 10/14/16.)

Last year’s sold-out event aimed to collect at least 200 new bras to be distributed to women at the YWCA and others who need them, but more than doubled their goal by collecting over 500 bras. Artist Sharon Bates will be on hand at the event to create a unique installation of the contributed bras. To tell us more we welcome Malissa Pilette-McClenon from the YWCA of the Greater Capital Region and Marion Roach Smith.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Capital District Women’s Employment & Resource Center (WERC.)   Our guests are: Elizabeth Miller, Executive Director of WERC; Tracy L. Bullett, Esq., who is on the WERC Board of Directors; and Melissa Lape Intake Specialist for WERC and WERC Graduate.

  Jennifer Chiaverini is the New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Grant and Madame JuleMrs. Lincoln's DressmakerThe SpymistressMrs. Lincoln's Rival, and the Elm Creek Quilts series.

Her new novel, Fates and Traitors, is about John Wilkes Booth, the mercurial son of an acclaimed British stage actor and Covent Garden flower girl, committed one of the most notorious acts in American history—the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yeuda Hanani continue their conversation about female composers, discussing Marianna Martines hearing the first and third movements from her Sonata per Cembalo in G Major performed by Nicoleta Paraschivescu.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani begins a series of conversations about female composers.

(Left to right) Stacey Yen, Nance Williamson and Maria-Christina Oliveras in Macbeth
T. Charles Erickson


  Fair is foul, and foul is fair -- more fair than usual in the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival’s production of Macbeth - now running in repertory at Boscobel House and Gardens in Garrison, NY.  The fairer for having a cast of only three actors, and all three -women.

Lee Sunday Evans directs Maria-Christina Oliveras, Nance Williamson, and Stacey Yen in the production and we are joined by two-thirds of the trio, Maria-Christina and Stacey, to talk about the production.

  In The Highest Glass Ceiling, best-selling historian Ellen Fitzpatrick tells the story of three remarkable women who set their sights on the American presidency. Victoria Woodhull (1872), Margaret Chase Smith (1964), and Shirley Chisholm (1972) each challenged persistent barriers confronted by women presidential candidates.

Their quest illuminates today’s political landscape, showing that Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign belongs to a much longer, arduous, and dramatic journey.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're checking in with the New York Council about the topic of one of their Democracy in Dialogue Town Halls. This event will be held this Tuesday at The Linda, WAMC's Performing Arts Studio, and will address issues related to gender-based workplace discrimination - including questions of unconscious bias, the history of workplace inequality, and how the skills of the humanities can address these issues.

We are joined by Sara Ogger, executive director of the New York Council for the Humanities, Barbara Smith, one of our frequent guests and a panelist at the event.


  It’s a Saturday in winter, somewhere in the suburbs, and a high school girls’ soccer team warms up for its indoor game. They stretch in sync – right quad, left quad, lunge – and their conversations spin around and off their turf, far outside the air dome bubble, and back again.

 

The Wolves, by Sarah DeLappe, is the second mainstage production this season presented by Vassar and New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theatre. The production, directed by Lila Neugebauer, runs July 21st through July 31st.

 

The play was a recipient of the American Playwriting Foundation’s inaugural Relentless Award and a finalist for the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize.

Sarah DeLappe joins us to tell us more.

LG Kathy Hochul
WAMC/Pat Bradley

On Wednesday, June 1st, 2016, the International Center of the Capital Region, in conjunction with Global Ties U.S. and the U.S. Department of State, will be hosting a Women’s Empowerment Diplomacy summit in Albany.

  The second annual SUNY Ulster OWN IT! Entrepreneurial Women’s Conference will be held on Thursday, June 2, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the College Lounge of Vanderlyn Hall on the Stone Ridge, New York SUNY Ulster campus.

This conference for women entrepreneurs and ‘dream-to-be entrepreneurs’ features nationally recognized speakers and hands-on workshops presented by regional experts.

The keynote speaker is Silda Wall Spitzer, Founder and CEO of woman-owned New York States of Mind, a digital magazine and marketplace that creates a new intellectual and economic platform for people, places, products and ideas in New York State; Principal at NewWorld Capital Group, a private equity firm investing in environmental opportunities, including energy efficiency, clean energy, water, waste-to-value and environmental services; and former first lady of New York State.

We are joined by Silda Wall Spitzer and Mindy Kole, Assistant Professor of Business and Director of The Darlene L. Pfeiffer Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at SUNY Ulster. 

  Women are making inroads in business, but still have a long way to go.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about her latest work on this issue. 

  The Musicians of Ma'alwyck will be presenting a special collaborative concert this Sunday with the Siena College Chorus and Chamber Singers under the direction of Dr. Timothy Reno celebrating the Suffragettes and the bicentennial of the birth of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Titled a "Declaration of Sentiments," the concert will feature works of American female composers Marion Bauer, Amy Beach, and Daybreak of English composer, Rebecca Clarke. They will also present the world premiere of a work based on Suffragette texts by Kathleen Ballantyne.

The event will be held at Druthers Brewery on Broadway in Albany. We welcome: Ann-Marie Barker Schwartz, Director of Musicians of Ma'alwyck and Jennifer Dorsey who heads the McCormick Center at Siena College.

  Debbie Macomber has been dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

She has 200 million books in print; the newest, A Girl’s Guide to Moving On, is about a mother and her daughter-in-law who both leave their respective troubled marriages and lean on each other while starting over.

  Upstate New York Women In Film & Television (UPWIFT) and The Linda WAMC’s Performing Arts Studio, will present a screening of the film, Racing Daylight on Friday, March 18th, at 8:00 p.m. The event will feature a conversation with director Nicole Quinn afterward. The movie is part of the Reel Women in Film series sponsored by UPWIFT and The Linda.

Racing Daylight was filmed in the Hudson Valley and features Oscar award-winning Ulster County resident Melissa Leo as well as Oscar nominated actor David Straithairn. It is a ghost story, a murder mystery and a love story which crosses time.

Nicole Quinn joins us.

Photo of Piper Kerman
Brian Bowen Smith

  Piper Kerman was a 24 year old Smith College graduate in 1993 when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord. This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with the woman involved in a drug smuggling ring and got Kerman got involved too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

Five years later she was named as part of the drug ring and in February 2008 she reported to the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Connecticut. Kerman’s memoir Orange is the New Black: My Year in Women’s Prison inspired the award winning Netflix television series of the same name. She will deliver the Alex Krieger Memorial Lecture at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie on Tuesday February 9th.

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