women

In their number one New York Times best seller Half the Sky, husband-and-wife team Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn brought to light struggles faced by women and girls around the globe, and showcased individuals and institutions working to address oppression and expand opportunity.

  In their latest book, now in paperback, A Path Appears  is a sweeping tapestry of people who are making the world a better place. The book is also a guide to the ways that we can do the same—whether with a donation of $5 or $5 mil­lion, with our time, by capitalizing on our skills as individuals, or by using the resources of our businesses.

Kristof and WuDunn, husband and wife, have co-authored three previous books: Half the SkyThunder from the East, and China Wakes. They were awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1990 for their coverage of China and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement in 2009.

The Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy will host a breakfast with Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn on Thursday October 29, in Albany. 

  This morning we will learn about a first-of-its-kind event to benefit female residents of the YWCA of the Greater Capital Region, based in Troy. The Arts Center will be hosting “Brava!” a fundraiser seeking to provide new bras to women at the YWCA.

  In 2008, on her second night of college, Aspen Matis was raped by a fellow student. Shattered and alone, she fled to the Mexican border to begin the 2,650 mile walk along the Pacific Crest Trail, through the unforgiving desert and mountains to Canada.

Reminiscent of Alice Sebold’s - Lucky and Cheryl Strayed’s - Wild, Matis has written a searing, yet hopeful story of survival in the wake of a horrific trauma and finding acceptance, hope, and healing in nature.

Girl In The Woods is a memoir of how Aspen’s horror became her salvation…and, yes, she found her future husband by the 2,000 mile mark.

  In her new story collection, Almost Famous Women, writer Megan Mayhew Bergman takes us into the lives of independent, inventive women at the margins of history.

Bergman has written fictionalized accounts of real-life, risk-taking women who have largely been forgotten.

  Sara Paretsky revolutionized the mystery world in 1982 with the introduction of private eye V.I. Warshawski in Indemnity Only. V.I. – tough, credible, street-smart, and feminine – challenged the stereotypes of women in fiction as victims or vamps and Paretsky made it possible for a new generation of crime writers to thrive.

In her new novel, Brush Back, Paretsky continues to use real-world issues to fuel her prose, when V.I. Warshawski confronts crooked politicians and buried secrets from her own Chicago past.

Like her celebrated protagonist, Sara Paretsky is a crusader for social justice and an advocate for those on society’s margins. Paretsky is currently president of the Mystery Writers of America.

  Local professional women supporting each other – that’s the mission of Women@Work – a bimonthly magazine devoted to helping women managers and executives navigate the world of work.

The Times Union publication also presents networking events and their next “Connect Event” is this Sunday, July 26th.  “Conquering the Dream: Champion Polo Player Sunny Hale Shares Her Story” at Greenfield Center from 3 to 5pm.

We are joined now by Jennifer Gish, Senior Editor of Women@Work magazine and Tracy Ormsbee, Executive Editor of the Times Union magazines.

  We hear from some women on the Congressional Corner – but not many.

In today’s segment, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Congress could use more.

  The Emmy-award winning Orange is the New Black, based on Piper Kerman’s memoir of the same name, depicts her arrest, conviction and incarceration for drug-trafficking. The show’s third season premieres tomorrow.

But the book and Netflix series are from only Kerman’s perspective. Now, Cleary Wolters, the real life Alex Vause and Piper's former drug-smuggling lover, tells her side of the story in a new book, Out of Orange.

  Tina Packer is one of the world's leading authorities on Shakespeare's work and the Founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA.

She'll be delivering the 19th Annual Burian Lecture on April 13th at SUNY Albany, sponsored by the Department of Theatre and co-sponsored by the NYS Writers Institute. In the lecture she'll discuss her new book, Women of Will: The Feminine in Shakespeare’s Plays

   In the summer of 2009, as she was covering the uprisings in Tehran for the New York Times, Iranian journalist Nazila Fathi received a phone call. “They have given your photo to snipers,” a government source warned her. Soon after, with undercover agents closing in, Fathi fled the country with her husband and two children, beginning a life of exile.

In The Lonely War, Fathi interweaves her story with that of the country she left behind, showing how Iran is locked in a battle between hardliners and reformers that dates back to the country’s 1979 revolution. Fathi was nine years old when that uprising replaced the Iranian shah with a radical Islamic regime.

Women Against War has brought Nazila Fathi to the Albany area to speak about Iran and about growing up in Iran and pursuing a career as a journalist reporting from Tehran. She will speak at Siena College from 4:30 – 6 PM today. The lecture will take place in the Kuhn Boland Room in Building #15 on the Siena Map.

Pages