When journalist Becky Aikman was widowed in her 40s, she felt unmoored. But she couldn’t find the kind of help that she needed, so she dug into the data and eventually created her own unique support system.

Her book, Saturday Night Widows: The Adventures of Six Friends Remaking Their Lives, details the trials and triumphs following tragedy — and new research about what really helps the bereaved.

  WAM Theatre is presenting a panel to discuss the challenges women face in the theater industry. “Claiming Her Place” will be a fun and lively evening co-produced and hosted by Tony nominee Jayne Atkinson. A panel including Lauren Ambrose, Michel Gill, Marin Mazzie, Debra Jo Rupp, and Linus Roache.

They will share their stories, observations and thoughts about the challenges women face in the entertainment industry. This morning, Kristen van Ginhoven, Artistic Director and co-founder of WAM Theatre joins us.

    When we decided to come north to broadcast live, we knew we wanted the folks from the Wiawaka Holiday House on the show. We certainly wanted them to share their amazing story and history with us. But, we also just get a kick out of saying Wiawaka.

Wiawaka is one of the oldest and longest continuously operated retreats for women in America. Today, Wiawaka continues as a summer retreat and on July 14th, they will be hosting a “Hyde Family Fun Day.”

Christine Dixon is the Executive Director of the Wiawaka Holiday House.

BIFF - "Girl Rising"

May 31, 2013

    This Saturday night the documentary Girl Rising will screen at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA as part of The Berkshire International Film Festival. The screening and the following panel discussion is presented in cooperation with the Interdependence Movement and 10×10.

The thesis of Girl Rising is simple: educating girls in the developing world will bring about transformational change. Every day, millions of girls wake to a world that does not see them. But dollar for dollar, they are the best investment in the developing world. 

Girl Rising tells the stories of nine real girls from around the world - girls in Cambodia, India, Nepal, Egypt, Peru, Ethiopia, Afghanistan, Haiti, and Sierra Leone. A female writer from each country has written the girl’s story and in the film, each vignette is narrated by an esteemed actress - including Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway, Chloe Grace Moretz, and Kerry Washington. That’s 9 countries, 9 girls, 9 writers, and 9 actresses. In between each girl’s story, the filmmakers share statistical information in an engaging manner and those presentations are narrated by Liam Neeson. 

5/29/13 - Panel

May 29, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain. Ray Graf moderates.

Topics include:
Moms Are Now Primary Breadwinners In 40 Percent Of Homes
Drone Protestors
Circling the media wagons

5/23/13 - Panel

May 23, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Newsman Ray Graf and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Drone Killings
Taping of Female Cadets
Boston Bombing Related Shooting
Weiner Run
Morals Poll

    Susan Jacoby, feminist—and the bestselling author of The Age of American Unreason, looks back at the last pre-feminist generation of men who supposedly had it all and asks: what exactly did they have?

She does so in her new book, Last Men on Top.

    Dr. Gina Barreca, author of It's Not That I'm Bitter: How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Visible Panty Lines and Conquered the World, has appeared on 20/20, The Today Show, CNN, the BBC, NPR, Oprah, and Dr. Phil to discuss gender, power, politics, and humor.

Her earlier books include the bestselling They Used to Call Me Snow White But I Drifted: Women's Strategic Use of Humor. She will be the keynote speaker at a fundraiser for Zonta Club of Northampton, MA on Thursday.

  On November 14, 1889, Nellie Bly, the crusading young female reporter for Joseph Pulitzer’s World newspaper, left New York City by steamship on a quest to break the record for the fastest trip around the world.

Also departing from New York that day—and heading in the opposite direction by train—was a young journalist from The Cosmopolitan magazine, Elizabeth Bisland. Each woman was determined to outdo Jules Verne’s fictional hero Phileas Fogg and circle the globe in less than eighty days. The dramatic race that ensued would span twenty-eight thousand miles, captivate the nation, and change both competitors’ lives forever.