World War II

New England News
6:26 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Little Known Holocaust Museum Keeps Doors Open In W. Mass.

Darrell English outside the New England Holocaust Institute and Museum at 45 Eagle St. in North Adams, MA.
Credit Jim Levulis / WAMC

A little known Holocaust museum in North Adams, Massachusetts will be able to keep its doors open for the next six months thanks to a donation.

Darrell English marvels at the artifacts hanging on the walls in the 750-foot square room he rents each month.

“An American flag around the corner here,” English said. “It’s a 48-star American flag. Nothing unusual about that. Except what’s stenciled on it. Which is a Nazi eagle.”

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed May 7, 2014

"A Higher Call" By Adam Makos

    

  Four days before Christmas 1943, a badly damaged American bomber struggled to fly over wartime Germany. At its controls was a 21-year-old pilot. Half his crew lay wounded or dead. It was their first mission. Suddenly, a sleek, dark shape pulled up on the bomber’s tail—a German fighter. Worse, the German pilot was an ace, a man able to destroy the American bomber in the squeeze of a trigger. What happened next would defy imagination and later be called the most incredible encounter between enemies in World War II.

This is the true story of the two pilots whose lives collided in the skies that day—the American—2nd Lieutenant Charlie Brown, a former farm boy from West Virginia who came to captain a B-17—and the German—2nd Lieutenant Franz Stigler, a former airline pilot from Bavaria who sought to avoid fighting in World War II.

The story is told in historian Adam Makos’ new book - A Higher Call - that follows both Charlie and Franz’s harrowing missions.

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New England News
10:32 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

WW II Fighter Ace From Massachusetts Dies

Credit wikipedia.org

James Goodson, a decorated World War II fighter pilot and former prisoner of war, who went on to a successful post-war business career, has died.

Goodson died Thursday at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth after a bout with pneumonia, according to his son, James Goodson Jr. He was 93.

The New York City native and Duxbury resident started fighting the Nazis even before the U.S. entered the war, flying Hurricanes and Spitfires as a member of a Royal Air Force American volunteer Eagle Squadron.

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New England News
8:00 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Mass. Veteran Gets Dog Tag He Lost 70 Years Ago

Credit Flickr

A dog tag a Massachusetts man lost as he stormed ashore at Anzio during the Allied invasion of Italy in 1944 has finally been returned, 70 years later.

World War II Army veteran Alfred Cabral received the weathered scrap of copper-nickel alloy during an emotional ceremony at a Worcester nursing home last weekend.

The now 88-year-old Cabral quivered and tears rose in his eyes as he received the identification tag.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"The Girls of Atomic City" By Denise Kiernan

    The Girls of Atomic City rescues a remarkable, forgotten chapter of American history from obscurity. Denise Kiernan captures the spirit of the times through these women: their pluck, their desire to contribute, and their enduring courage.

At the height of World War II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, consuming more electricity than New York City. But to most of the world, the town did not exist. Thousands of civilians--many of them young women from small towns across the South--were recruited to this secret city, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work. Kept very much in the dark, few would ever guess the true nature of the tasks they performed each day in the hulking factories in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains. That is, until the end of the war--when Oak Ridge's secret was revealed.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"Jacob's Oath" By Martin Fletcher

Martin Fletcher has been called the gold standard of TV war correspondents and is rapidly building a new reputation as an author. He has won almost every award in television journalism, including 5 Emmys.

His latest novel is Jacob's Oath. As World War II comes to a close, Europe’s roads are clogged with 20 million exhausted refugees walking home. Among them are Jacob and Sarah, lonely holocaust survivors who meet in Huddle berg. Jacob is consumed with hatred and cannot rest until he kills his brother’s murderer, a concentration camp guard.

He must now choose between revenge and love, and avenging the past and building a new future. 

Hudson Valley News
1:33 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

HV Congressman To Present Medals To WWII Veteran

A New York congressman will present Army medals to a World War Two veteran in Dutchess County Wednesday afternoon.

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The Roundtable
11:50 am
Wed June 19, 2013

Listener Essay - Manuel Bromberg

  Jeanne Hunter shares part of the life story of Manuel Bromberg.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri June 14, 2013

"Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis" by Robert Edsel

    When Hitler’s armies occupied Italy in 1943, they also seized control of mankind’s greatest cultural treasures. As they had done throughout Europe, the Nazis could now plunder the masterpieces of the Renaissance, the treasures of the Vatican, and the antiquities of the Roman Empire. 

Robert Edsel joins us to talk about the efforts to save Italy’s great artistic treasures from the Nazis. 

His book is Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon May 20, 2013

History and Family at The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

    The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York is in the midst of their countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th.

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