Rabbi Dan Ornstein - To Speak the Truth, or not?

Feb 14, 2013

At a recent writing workshop I attended, I read a short, painful piece about the illness and death of a high school friend to my fellow writers.   For some time since writing the piece, I have been struggling with the wisdom of attempting to publish it because some of my friend’s family members are still alive, and much of what I wrote might be quite distressing to them if they saw it in print.  The group told me to stop worrying about this, specifically because they felt that the essay honors her memory, and that the main goal of personal essay and memoir is honest self- expression.  Still

Writers know it instinctively: Verbs make a sentence zing. Grammar gurus agree: Drama in writing emerges from the interplay of a subject (noun) and a predicate (verb).

In the new book Several Short Sentences About Writing , author and New York Times editorial board member Verlyn Klinkenborg does away with much of the traditional wisdom on writing and dissects the sentence — its structure, its intention, its semantic craftsmanship — to deliver a new, useful, and direct guide to the art of storytelling.

Michael Adams teaches English language and literature at Indiana University. He is the author of Slayer Slang: A Buffy the Vampire Slayer Lexicon and editor of From Elvish to Klingon.

from janusadams.com

For five days, August 6th through the 10th, Janus Adams will host a Writer’s Retreat in the Catskills.

The hands-on workshop intensive is for new and seasoned writers with a work-in-progress. With space limited to 8 attendees, the program affords each participant time to write, read, reflect, share positive criticism, and grow in a supportive environment.