Joe Donahue

Senior Director of News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

Arundhati Roy published her first novel, The God of Small Things, back in 1997 and now Roy is back with a new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness.

In it, she weaves among other threads, the story of a transgender woman in Delhi and a Kashmiri freedom fighter while also shining a spotlight on modern India.

"The Graduate" opened 50 years ago today.

When it premiered in December 1967, its filmmakers had only modest expectations for what seemed to be a small, sexy art-house comedy adapted from an obscure first novel by an eccentric twenty-four-year-old.

There was little indication that this offbeat story - a young man just out of college has an affair with one of his parents’ friends and then runs off with her daughter - would turn out to be a monster hit, with an extended run in theaters and seven Academy Award nominations.

Laced with humor, rich historical detail from Charles Dickens’ life, and clever winks to his work, Samantha Silva's "Mr. Dickens and His Carol" is a new take on a cherished classic.

Christmas: A Biography

Dec 22, 2017

Christmas is all things to all people: a religious festival, a family celebration, a period of eating and drinking. In Christmas: A Biography, bestselling author and acclaimed social historian Judith Flanders casts a sharp eye on myths, legends and history, deftly moving from the origins of the holiday in the Roman empire, through Christmas trees in central Europe, to what might be the first appearance of Santa Claus – in Switzerland – to draw a picture of the season as it has never been seen before.

You can make your spirits (the alcoholic kind) brighter with some imagination and dazzling drink recipes, including martinis, punches, eggnog, and so many more seasonal favorites.

Chris Weld from Berkshire Mountain Distillers is here to tell us how to make some awesome cocktails for the Holidays.

Established in 2007, Berkshire Mountain Distillers (BMD) has created a line of award-winning artisanal spirits including Ethereal Gins, Ragged Mountain Rum, Ice Glen Vodka, Berkshire Bourbon and New England Corn Whiskey.

12/21/17 Panel

Dec 21, 2017

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld, editor and marketer Stu Shinske and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois.

A Life In Ornaments

Dec 20, 2017
Brandywine Bear ornament
Bob Eisenhardt

First highlighted in the New York Times, Bonnie Mackay’s annual Christmas tree showcases a lifetime collecting almost 3,000 ornaments. 

Now, through beautiful photography and illuminating vignettes, Tree of Treasures shares the heartfelt stories behind a hundred of those cherished possessions, whether it’s the story of a family member, like Mackay’s grandfather, a well-known vaudeville performer; long-held relationships with friends and colleagues in the international community of Christmas crafts makers; a memory of a beloved pet; and much more. 

A timely second edition of the classic text on transgender history, with a new introduction and updated material throughout.

Covering American transgender history from the mid-twentieth century to today, Transgender History takes a chronological approach to the subject of transgender history, with each chapter covering major movements, writings, and events. Chapters cover the transsexual and transvestite communities in the years following World War II; trans radicalism and social change, which spanned from 1966 with the publication of The Transsexual Phenomenon, and lasted through the early 1970s; the mid-'70s to 1990-the era of identity politics and the changes witnessed in trans circles through these years; and the gender issues witnessed through the '90s and '00s.

Susan Stryker is Associate Professor of Gender and Women's Studies, as well as Director of the Institute for LGBT Studies.

12/20/17 Panel

Dec 20, 2017

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Berkshire Eagle Reporter Jenn Smith, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, and Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill.

New York Times bestselling author of "The Martian" - Andy Weir’s new novel "Artemis," is a near-future crime caper where Weir introduces us to Jazz, a smart, directionless twenty-something who is dreaming of a better life in a small town. Except the small town happens to be named Artemis—and it’s the first and only city on the moon.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to set us straight on online collaboration tools and teleconferencing.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

     Today's Book Picks come from Matt Tannenbaum from The Bookstore in Lenox.

List:
"The Mouse and His Child" by Russell Hoban
"Devotions" by Patti Smith
"Spy of the First Person" by Sam Shepard
"Good Things Happen Slowly" by Fred Hersch
"Patrick Leigh Fermor: A Life in Letters"
"Women and Power" by Mary Beard
"Silence In the Age of Noise" by Erling Kagge

Dr. John Bargh, the world’s leading expert on the unconscious mind, presents a groundbreaking book, twenty years in the making, which gives us an entirely new understanding of the hidden mental processes that secretly govern every aspect of our behavior.

For more than three decades, Dr. John Bargh has been responsible for the revolutionary research into the unconscious mind, research that informed bestsellers like Blink and Thinking Fast and Slow. Now, in what Dr. John Gottman said “will be the most important and exciting book in psychology that has been written in the past twenty years,” Dr. Bargh takes us on an entertaining and enlightening tour of the forces that affect everyday behavior while transforming our understanding of ourselves in profound ways.

12/19/17 Panel

Dec 19, 2017

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain and the Empire Report’s J. P. Miller.

Bellevue Hospital, on New York City's East Side, occupies a colorful and horrifying place in the public imagination: a den of mangled crime victims, vicious psychopaths, assorted derelicts, lunatics, and exotic-disease sufferers. In its two and a half centuries of service, there was hardly an epidemic or social catastrophe—or groundbreaking scientific advance—that did not touch Bellevue.

12/18/17 Panel

Dec 18, 2017

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

In this hour, we will start off with an open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. It is our Roundtable panel. Joining me for the discussion: WAMC’s Alan Chartock and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois and Political Consultant Libby Post.

This morning, we talk the with the head of the Food Pantries for the Capital District, Natasha Pernicka, about their new partnership with Field Goods.

Founder/President Donna Williams says Field Goods collects participants’ donations for fresh produce — grown at the 60 small farms in Field Goods’ network — and delivers the produce to The Food Pantries for the Capital District, a coalition of more than 60 food pantries in Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga, and Schenectady Counties.

Zingerman's Bakehouse

Dec 15, 2017

This is the must-have baking book for bakers of all skill levels. Since 1992, Michigan's renowned artisanal bakery, Zingerman's Bakehouse in Ann Arbor, has fed a fan base across the United States and beyond with their chewy-sweet brownies and gingersnaps, famous sour cream coffee cake, and fragrant loaves of Jewish rye, challah, and sourdough. It's no wonder Zingerman's is a cultural and culinary institution. Now, for the first time, to celebrate their 25th anniversary, the Zingerman's bakers share 65 meticulously tested, carefully detailed recipes in a beautiful hardcover book featuring more than 50 color photographs and bountiful illustrations. Behind-the-scenes stories of the business enrich this collection of best-of-kind, delicious recipes for every "I can't believe I get to make this at home!" treat.

Frank Carollo, baker extraordinaire and co-owner of Zingerman's Bakehouse, joins us this morning. 

Based on unprecedented access to previously classified documents and dozens of interviews with key policymakers, here is the untold story of how George H. W. Bush faced a critical turning point of history—the end of the Cold War.

The end of the Cold War was the greatest shock to international affairs since World War II. In that perilous moment, Saddam Hussein chose to invade Kuwait, China cracked down on its own pro-democracy protesters, and regimes throughout Eastern Europe teetered between democratic change and new authoritarians. Not since FDR in 1945 had a U.S. president faced such opportunities and challenges.

As the presidential historian Jeffrey Engel reveals in this page-turning history, behind closed doors from the Oval Office to the Kremlin, George H. W. Bush rose to the occasion brilliantly. Distrusted by such key allies as Margaret Thatcher and dismissed as too cautious by the press, Bush had the experience and the wisdom to use personal, one-on-one diplomacy with world leaders. Bush knew when it was essential to rally a coalition to push Iraq out of Kuwait.

12/15/17 Panel

Dec 15, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Joining us for the discussion: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, Corporate Attorney Rich Honen and Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti.

From an award-winning, “meticulously observant” (The New Yorker) writer, Helen Thorpe, comes a powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

The Newcomers follows the lives of twenty-two immigrant teenagers throughout the course of the 2015-2016 school year as they land at South High School in Denver, Colorado, in an English Language Acquisition class created specifically for them. Speaking no English, unfamiliar with American culture, their stories are poignant and remarkable as they face the enormous challenge of adapting. These newcomers, from fourteen to nineteen years old, come from nations convulsed by drought or famine or war. Many come directly from refugee camps, after experiencing dire forms of cataclysm. Some arrive alone, having left or lost every other member of their original family.

Helen Thorpe was born in London to Irish parents. She is an award-winning journalist who lives in Denver, Colorado. Her journalism has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and 5280.

Michael Rapaport, actor, Top 50 podcaster, award-winning film maker, and sports fanatic, is here to set the world straight on the greatest and downright worst athletes, players, teams, and jerseys—while refusing to mention statistics, analytics, or anything else that isn’t pure hustle.

In This Book Has Balls, Rapaport uses his signature smack-talk style and in-your-face humor to discuss everything from why LeBron will never be like Mike, that Tiger needs the ladies to get his golf game back, and how he once thought Mary Lou Retton was his true love. And, of course, why next year will be the year the New York Knicks win the championship. This book is a series of rants—some controversial, some affectionate, but all incredibly hilarious.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen:

The Disaster Artist, Lady Bird        

Upcoming:

Eileen Ivers Joyful Christmas

Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Thursday 12/14, 7:30 PM

Just Imagine

Madison Theater, Albany, Thursday 12/14, 7 PM

12/14/17 Panel

Dec 14, 2017

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Joining us for the discussion: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Counter-Terrorism Expert Malcolm Nance, Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois.

The mix of science, history, and high-concept adventure is always first-rate in a James Rollins novel, and that’s true here in his latest, The Demon Crown, even with killer wasps in the mix—and don’t forget bones and Alexander Graham Bell!

12/13/17 Panel

Dec 13, 2017

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Joining us for the discussion: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, the Berkshire Eagle’s Jenn Smith and Communications Consultants Theresa Bourgeois and Joe Bonilla.

In her admired works of fiction, including the recent "The Book That Matters Most," best-selling author Ann Hood explores the transformative power of literature.

In her new book, "Morningstar," she reveals the personal story behind beloved novels in her life.

It's one of the most revered movies of Hollywood's golden era. Starring screen legend Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in her first significant film role, High Noon was shot on a lean budget over just thirty-two days but achieved instant box-office and critical success. It won four Academy Awards in 1953, including a best actor win for Cooper. And it became a cultural touchstone, often cited by politicians as a favorite film, celebrating moral fortitude.

Yet what has been often overlooked is that High Noon was made during the height of the Hollywood blacklist, a time of political inquisition and personal betrayal. In the middle of the film shoot, screenwriter Carl Foreman was forced to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his former membership in the Communist Party.

In "High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic," Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel tells the story of the making of a great American Western, exploring how Carl Foreman's concept of High Noon evolved from idea to first draft to final script, taking on allegorical weight. Both the classic film and its turbulent political times emerge newly illuminated.

Sheri Bauer-Mayorga and Thomas Chulak from Chatham Bookstore in Chatham, NY join us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich
Great Jazz & Pop Vocal Albums by Will Friedwald
Muddy by Michael Mahin with illustrations by Evan Turk
Hunter of Stories by Eduardo Galeano 
Elmet by Fiona Mozley
It's All Relative by A.J. Jacobs
American Wolf by Nate Blakeslee

Can Europe prosper without the euro?

In 2010, the 2008 global financial crisis morphed into the “eurocrisis.” It has not abated. The 19 countries of Europe that share the euro currency―the eurozone―have been rocked by economic stagnation and debt crises. Some countries have been in depression for years while the governing powers of the eurozone have careened from emergency to emergency, most notably in Greece.

In The Euro, Nobel Prize–winning economist and best-selling author Joseph E. Stiglitz dismantles the prevailing consensus around what ails Europe, demolishing the champions of austerity while offering a series of plans that can rescue the continent―and the world―from further devastation.

He also revised his past best-seller: Globalization and Its Discontents, now titled Globalization and Its Discontents Revisited: Anti-Globalization in the Era of Trump. 

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