The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.


  The new film, Speech & Debate, directed by Dan Harris, tells the story of three “outsider” teenagers frustrated by the hypocrisy they see in their parents, teachers, and their entire school board in Salem, Oregon. The film deals with issues of homophobia, First Amendment rights, and censorship alongside trust, friendship, coping with high school. In order to find a way to make their voices heard in their community, Diwata, Solomon, and Howie revive their school’s defunct Speech & Debate team.

 

The screenplay was adapted by Stephen Karam from his play of the same name. Karam is a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist and his three most recent plays, Speech & Debate, Sons of the Prophet, and The Humans - the latter of which won the Tony Award for Best Play last year - have all been produced in New York City by Roundabout Theatre Company.

Sarah Steele plays Diwata in the film - reprising her role in the Off-Broadway stage production in 2007. Other credit’s include Brigid in The Humans, the 2004 film Spanglish, CBS’s The Good Wife and its spin-off for CBS All-Access, The Good Fight -- on which she plays Marissa Gold.

Steele’s Speech & Debate character, Diwata, is the quintessential High School Drama kid. She sees her life through the lens of whichever play was most recently put up in her school’s auditorium. She’s impulsive -- but she means well. Sarah Steele joins us.

1984 At The Moviehouse

6 hours ago

On Tuesday, April 4 at 7 p.m. The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY will be showing 1984, the second film adaptation of the George Orwell novel – starring John Hurt, Richard Burton and Suzanna Hamilton.

The film is set during April of 1984 in post-atomic war London, the capital city of the repressive totalitarian state of Oceania.

Following the film, there will be a discussion and Q&A with  Professor Roger Berkowitz, Director of the Hannah Arendt Center for the Humanities and Politics, Bard College, where he teaches political theory, legal thought, and human rights. 

Veteran health journalist Mary Otto looks inside America’s mouth, revealing unsettling truths about our unequal society.

Her new book, Teeth, takes readers on a disturbing journey into America’s silent epidemic of oral disease, exposing the hidden connections between tooth decay and stunted job prospects, low educational achievement, social mobility, and the troubling state of our public health.

Mary Otto is the oral health topic leader for the Association of Health Care Journalists. She began writing about oral health at the Washington Post, where she worked for eight years covering social issues including health care and poverty. 

Congressman Peter Welch
http://www.welch.house.gov/about-peter/

Should Democrats filibuster Judge Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Whether shopping with military precision or hanging the tea towels just so, compulsion is something most of us have witnessed in daily life. But compulsions exist along a broad continuum, and at the opposite end of these mild forms exist life altering disorders.

Sharon Begley’s Can't Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions is the first book of its kind to examine all of these behaviors—mild and extreme (OCD, hoarding, acquiring, exercise, even compulsions to do good)—together, as they should be, because while forms of compulsion may look incredibly different, these are actually all coping responses to varying degrees of anxiety.

3/29/17 Panel

9 hours ago

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois, and corporate attorney, Rich Honen.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of dealing with almighty #hashtag on social media..

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant working mostly with iOS and FileMaker for nonprofits, small businesses, and other organizations. His most recent books are iPad for Seniors for Dummies and Learn Apple HomeKit on iOS.

   This week's Book Picks come from Connie Brooks and Kate Reid of Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY.

List:

The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel

Ill Will by Dan Chaon

Blue Light Yokohama by Nicolas Obregon

The Idiot by Elif Batuman

I Just Want to Say Good Night by Rachel Isadora

Tidy by Emily Gravett

Rocks, Minerals, and Fossils - Spotlight Guides by Neil Curtis

Congressman Peter Welch
http://www.welch.house.gov/about-peter/

FBI Director James Comey’s testimony meant different things to different people.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

As a player, Charles Dillon "Casey" Stengel's contemporaries included Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, and Christy Mathewson . . . and he was the only person in history to wear the uniforms of all four New York teams: the Dodgers, Giants, Yankees, and Mets.

As a legendary manager, he formed indelible, complicated relationships with Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, and Billy Martin. For more than five glorious decades, Stengel was the undisputed, quirky, hilarious, and beloved face of baseball--and along the way he revolutionized the role of manager while winning a spectacular ten pennants and seven World Series Championships.  

But for a man who spent so much of his life in the limelight--an astounding fifty-five years in professional baseball--Stengel remains an enigma. Acclaimed New York Yankees' historian and bestselling author Marty Appel digs into Casey Stengel's quirks and foibles, unearthing a tremendous trove of baseball stories, perspective, and history. His new biography is: Casey Stengel: Baseball’s Greatest Character.

3/28/17 Panel

Mar 28, 2017

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

In 1991, the police were called to East 72nd St. in Manhattan, where a woman's body had fallen from a twelfth-story window. The woman’s husband, Herbert Weinstein, soon confessed to having hit and strangled his wife after an argument, then dropping her body out of their apartment window to make it look like a suicide. The 65-year-old Weinstein, a quiet, unassuming retired advertising executive, had no criminal record, no history of violent behavior—not even a short temper. How, then, to explain this horrific act?
 
Journalist Kevin Davis uses the perplexing story of the Weinstein murder to present a riveting, deeply researched exploration of the intersection of neuroscience and criminal justice. Shortly after Weinstein was arrested, an MRI revealed a cyst the size of an orange on his brain’s frontal lobe, the part of the brain that governs judgment and impulse control. Weinstein’s lawyer seized on that discovery, arguing that the cyst had impaired Weinstein’s judgment and that he should not be held criminally responsible for the murder. It was the first case in the United States in which a judge allowed a scan showing a defendant’s brain activity to be admitted as evidence to support a claim of innocence.

Kevin Davis' new book is The Brain Defense: Murder in Manhattan and the Dawn of Neuroscience in America's Courtrooms.

The upcoming Jane Austen Conference in Saratoga Springs will take place on April 21-23, 2017.  The New York City Region of the Jane Austen Society of North America is organizing a long weekend that ties together the theme of Spas and Spies in Austen’s England.  

Lectures include "Watering Holes and Literary Rogues: Seduction and Seducers in English Spa Towns,” “Most Secret and Confidential': Espionage and Intelligence in the Age of Jane Austen,” "The Watering Place in the 18th-Century British Imagination: Sanitizing the Bath" and "History of Saratoga Springs' Spas and Spies"

Patricia Friesen of the Capital District Region of the Jane Austen Society of North America and she joins us.

Commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics from its establishment in 1930 until his retirement in 1962, Harry Anslinger is the United States’ little known first drug czar. Anslinger was a profligate propagandist with a flair for demonizing racial and immigrant groups and perhaps best known for his zealous pursuit of harsh drug penalties and his particular animus for marijuana users.

But what made Anslinger who he was, and what cultural trends did he amplify and institutionalize? In her book, Assassin of Youth, Alexandra Chasin looks to answer those questions and explore Anslinger’s social, cultural, and political legacy.

Alexandra Chasin is associate professor of literary studies at Eugene Lang College, the New School. 

Congressman Peter Welch
http://www.welch.house.gov/about-peter/

The White House recently had a visitor from the Northeast.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about his meeting with President Trump.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we tell you about the Hackethon For Social Good at the Tech Valley Center Of Gravity in Troy. Our guest: is Holly Cargill-Cramer - Executive Director at Tech Valley Center Of Gravity.

3/27/17 Panel

Mar 27, 2017

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

Brad Gooch is a poet, novelist, and biographer, whose most recent book is Rumi's Secret: The Life of the Sufi Poet of Love. He is the author of ten previous works, including: the memoir Smash Cut; the acclaimed biography of Frank O'Hara, City Poet; and Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor, which was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and New York Times best seller. The recipient of National Endowment for the Humanities and Guggenheim fellowships, he earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University and is Professor of English at William Paterson University in New Jersey.

In Rumi's Secret, Gooch brings to life the man and puts a face to the name Rumi, vividly coloring in his time and place—a world as rife with conflict as our own.

In Anne Makepeace’s new documentary, two Native American judges reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth. By addressing the root causes of crime, they are providing models of restorative justice that are working. Mainstream courts across the country are taking notice.

The film will screen at The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY on Sunday, March 26 at 11 a.m. The screening is presented by FilmWorks Forum.

Anne Makepeace has been a writer, producer, and director of award-winning independent films for more three decades. Tribal Justice, will premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in February 2017, and will culminate in a national PBS broadcast later this year.

Image Provided

Established in 1934 by the Lenox Garden Club, The Berkshire Botanical Garden is a not-for-profit, membership-supported educational organization encompassing 15 acres of cultivated land in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

As un-Spring-like as it feels outside in the region today, we are going to learn about Berkshire Botanical Garden’s spring and summer plans and their The Center House Project expansion.

We are joined by Mike Beck, the Executive Director of The Berkshire Botanical Garden and Matt Larkin, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Jacqueline Kellachan from The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
Exit West by Moshin Hamid
Blitzed: Drugs in The Third Reich by Norman Ohler
South and West by Joan Didion
I Feel Bad. All Day. Every Day. About Everything by Orli Auslander
Radiant Child by Javaka Steptoe
Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets by Kwame Alexander, illustrated by Ekua Holmes

Barney: Grove Press and Barney Rosset, America’s Maverick Publisher and His Battle against Censorship by Michael Rosenthal
The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of The Wild Catskills by Leslie Sharpe

3/24/17 Panel

Mar 24, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, author and activist Barbara Smith, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

The New York State Brewers Association will be holding their fourth annual New York Craft Brewers Festival taking place this Saturday March 25th at the Desmond Hotel in Albany.

The New York Craft Brewers Festival brings together 50 New York Breweries (and brewers) from every region of the state featuring up to 100+ hard to find and award winning beers.

This is a great opportunity to meet the NYS brewers that make the beer, and the owners of the local food scene in the Capital District that are such an important part of the community.

We welcome - Paul Leone, Executive Director New York State Brewers Association. We also welcome Nikki Cavanaugh from Rushing Duck Brewing in Chester NY and Kevin Mullen with Rare Form Brewing.

David Salle is an internationally renowned painter whose work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Museum and National Galarie of Berlin, among many others.   He also has a long-standing involvement with performance working extensively over the last 25 years with choreographer Karole Armitage, creating sets and costumes for many of her ballets and operas.  Salle is also a prolific writer on art. His new book is How To See.

On Wednesday, March 23, he will be featured in the New York Writers Institute The Creative Life Series in conversation with Joe Donahue, live in the Recital Hall at UAlbany at 7pm. 

The Academy of Music Theatre is mounting a new work by playwright Carol Carpenter entitled Sweet, Sweet Spirit on March 24th and 25th at 7:30 p.m.  The play addresses gay bashing and child abuse within a West Texas conservative family whose gay teenage son is beaten into a coma by his father.

Carpenter takes her audience deeper into an exploration of a family struggling with their own fear and heart.  The son, Tyler, who is described as “different,” but not referred to by his family members as gay, affects each of the members of this Southern Christian family in disparate ways.

We are joined Debra J'Anthony, Academy of Music Theatre's Executive Director and Sheila Siragusa, director of Sweet, Sweet Spirit.

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