The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Photograph of a portion of Tanja Hollander's "Are You Really My Friend?" at MASS MoCA
MASS MoCA's Instagram


  How often do you get a friend request on Facebook from someone whose name you don’t recognize? You have mutual friends. You check those names -- and then you aren’t sure exactly who some of those people are either - or how you know them. Imagine telling someone 15 years ago that you have friends you don’t know -- and not in that “a stranger is a just a friend you haven’t met yet” optimistic way.

Tanja Hollander’s new exhibition Are You Really My Friend? is currently on view at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA. The show explores, through portraits and paraphernalia, what friendship means to Tanja and what friendship means today - in the age of social media and easy surface relationships. She set out to connect with and photograph her 626 Facebook friends.

I spoke with Tanja and curator Denise Markonish at the museum recently and began by asking Tanja when and where she had the idea for the project.

Brad Gooch is a poet, novelist, and biographer, whose most recent book is Rumi's Secret: The Life of the Sufi Poet of Love. He is the author of ten previous works, including: the memoir Smash Cut; the acclaimed biography of Frank O'Hara, City Poet; and Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor, which was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and New York Times best seller. The recipient of National Endowment for the Humanities and Guggenheim fellowships, he earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University and is Professor of English at William Paterson University in New Jersey.

In Rumi's Secret, Gooch brings to life the man and puts a face to the name Rumi, vividly coloring in his time and place—a world as rife with conflict as our own.

The Trump administration is trying again with its immigrant and refugee policy.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

When archaeologists ventured into a thick Honduran rainforest in 2015, they were searching in an unexplored valley for the remnants of a long-lost city. Legend had it that an ancient metropolis was buried under centuries worth of jungle growth.

Best-selling author Douglas Preston went along on the expedition. The archaeologists Preston followed had the advantage of detailed survey maps to guide them to precise locations. Three years earlier, scientists had deployed advanced LIDAR (Light Imaging, Detection, And Ranging) technology to peer through the rainforest canopy to reveal a sprawling ancient metropolis.

Preston has detailed the experience in a new book The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story.

3/1/17 Panel

4 hours ago

         The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and corporate attorney Rich Honen.

Dr. Jessica Nutik Zitter is one of only a handful of physicians in the United States double board certified to practice both pulmonary/critical care medicine AND palliative care medicine. In other words, she’s the doctor who will save you when you are admitted to the ICU with a gunshot wound, but she is also the doctor who can help you navigate a peaceful and easy way to the end when the end really arrives.

In her new book - Extreme Measures – we learn about a framework for a better way to exit life that will change our medical culture at the deepest level, and will perhaps leave you pondering, when ‘the end is near’, in our zeal to save life, are we often just worsening death?

  Today's Book Picks come from Matt Tannenbaum from The Bookstore in Lenox.

List:
High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic by Glenn Frankel
Black Sunset: Hollywood Sex, Lies, Glamour, Betrayal and Raging Egos by Clancy Sigal
Mary Astor's Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936 by Ed Sorel
The Black Notebook by Patrick Modiano - Mark Polizzotti (Translator)

What is a U.S. representative’s obligation to constituents?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why he thinks town hall meetings are vital.

In Adam Grant’s New York Times bestseller, Originals: How Non-Conformists Move The World, he focuses on an underappreciated subset of American culture: the trailblazers among us. Why do some people with bold ideas succeed while others fail? What gives some people the courage to constantly go against the grain and buck outdated traditions? Is it possible to become less conformist as we age or are we either born risk-takers or not?

Bolstered by his own research as well as the latest studies of his peers, Grant answers these questions and more, proving that to be groundbreaking, one needn’t necessarily move fast or take enormous risks. As it turns out, true originals might be more afraid than any of us of making the wrong move – they just know how to use their own fear to their advantage.

Adam Grant is a bestselling author and a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. 

2/28/17 Panel

Feb 28, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao.

Ellen Hopkins is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eleven young adult novels, as well as the adult novels TrianglesCollateral, and Love Lies Beneath.

Her latest is The You I've Never Known.

For centuries scientists have written off cannibalism as a bizarre phenomenon with little biological significance. Its presence in nature was dismissed as a desperate response to starvation or other life-threatening circumstances, and few spent time studying it. A taboo subject in our culture, the behavior was portrayed mostly through horror movies or tabloids sensationalizing the crimes of real-life flesh-eaters. But the true nature of cannibalism--the role it plays in evolution as well as human history--is even more intriguing (and more normal) than the misconceptions we’ve come to accept as fact.

In Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,zoologist Bill Schutt sets the record straight, debunking common myths and investigating our new understanding of cannibalism’s role in biology, anthropology, and history in the most fascinating account yet written on this complex topic.

Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. You will read about men who were political leaders and men who were activists and cultural tastemakers. These men have been lauded for generations for creating the most exciting and influential city in the world.

But that's not the whole story.

The Women Who Made New York by Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made New York City the cultural epicenter of the world.

Julie Scelfo will be at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck on March 1.

New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik
Office of Congresswoman Elise Stefanik

New York’s 21st Congressional district is one of the largest east of the Mississippi.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican Elise Stefanik concludes her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial FoundationProviding a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on Guilderhaven – a non-profit helping the animal community. They provide low-cost spay/neuter, food, and medical intervention for the companion animals of New York residents and for wildlife. They also assist rescue organizations in this endeavor, with an emphasis on the local community.

To tell us more, we welcome Sue Green, Chair of Guilderhaven.

2/27/17 Panel

Feb 27, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

Everyone knows that America is 50 states and…some other stuff. Scattered shards in the Pacific and the Caribbean, the not-quite states—American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands—and their 4 million people are often forgotten, even by most Americans. But they’re filled with American flags, U.S. post offices, and Little League baseball games. How did these territories come to be part of the United States? What are they like? And why aren’t they states?

Doug Mach explores these questions in his book, The Not-Quite States of America: Dispatches from the Territories and Other Far-Flung Outposts of the USA.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. This week’s composer is Ludwig van Beethoven.

Lisa Dickey traveled across the whole of Russia three times - in 1995, 2005 and 2015 - making friends in eleven different cities, then coming back again and again to see how their lives had changed. Like the acclaimed British documentary series Seven Up!, she traces the ups and downs of ordinary people’s lives, in the process painting a deeply nuanced portrait of modern Russia.

Her book is Bears in the Streets: Three Journeys across a Changing Russia.

New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik
Office of Congresswoman Elise Stefanik

2016 is just behind us, but another election always looms.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican Elise Stefanik continues her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

In Why Won't You Apologize?: Healing Big Betrayals and Everyday Hurts, renowned psychologist and bestselling author of The Dance of Anger sheds new light on the two most important words in the English language - I’m sorry - and offers a unique perspective on the challenge of healing broken connections and restoring trust.

Dr. Harriet Lerner has been studying apologies—and why some people won’t give them—for more than two decades. Now she offers compelling stories and solid theory that bring home how much the simple apology matters and what is required for healing when the hurt we’ve inflicted (or received) is far from simple.

2/24/17 Panel

Feb 24, 2017

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and author and activist, Barbara Smith.  

Thelma Adams is an established figure in the entertainment industry. For two decades, she has penned celebrity features and film criticism for high-profile publications. She writes a weekly column for the New York Observer.

She joins us to discuss the 89th Academy Awards which will take place this Sunday.

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik
Office of Congresswoman Elise Stefanik

New York’s North Country swung from blue to red this election.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican Elise Stefanik tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what she makes of November’s results.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

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