The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

    The Breakfast Club defined an entire generation of pop culture and included such talent as Molly Ringwald “the princess,” Anthony Michael Hall “the brain,” Emilio Estevez “the jock,” Judd Nelson “the criminal,” and Ally Sheedy “the basket-case.”

It is likely the late John Hughes most-loved film and it's receiving a cinema re-release from Fathom Events tomorrow night and next Tuesday, March 31st. To commemorate the anniversary, we spoke with Kirk Honeycutt about his book, John Hughes: A Life in Film.  

Honeycutt is the former chief film critic for The Hollywood Reporter for many years and subsequent to that, senior film reporter for that publication. Honeycutt is a member of the prestigious Los Angeles Film Critics Association, and is the creator of Honeycutt's Hollywood, a popular film review website.

  Molly Ringwald’s Twitter Bio line reads: actress, writer, singer, mother, your former teen-age crush. Indeed, I will admit, I had a crush on Molly Ringwald in the mid 1980’s when she starred in the John Hughes classic films Pretty in Pink, Sixteen Candles and The Breakfast Club. We were both teenagers then. In fact, we are the same age. Yes, she knows her fan base.

A lot of that fan base will, no doubt, be getting together this Saturday night at Proctors Theatre in Schenectady for the event: Molly Ringwald Revisits the Club - The 30th Anniversary Screening of The Breakfast Club. She will be part of an on-stage discussion and Q&A following the movie.

The Breakfast Club is known as the “quintessential 1980s film” and is considered one of the best films of the decade. The film was ranked #1 on Entertainment Weekly’s list of the 50 Best High School Movies. Molly Ringwald was ranked #1 on VH-1’s 100 Greatest Teen Stars. And to prove my job doesn’t get much cooler than this: we welcome Molly Ringwald to The RT this morning.

    

  Stokely Carmichael, the charismatic and controversial black activist, stepped onto the pages of history when he called for “Black Power” during a speech one Mississippi night in 1966.

A firebrand who straddled both the American civil rights and Black Power movements, Carmichael would stand for the rest of his life at the center of the storm he had unleashed that night.

In Stokely, preeminent civil rights scholar Peniel E. Joseph presents a groundbreaking biography of Carmichael, using his life as a prism through which to view the transformative African American freedom struggles of the twentieth century.

  In 2006, Tavis Smiley teamed up with other leaders in the Black community to create a national plan of action to address the ten most crucial issues facing African Americans. 

The Covenant with Black America, which became a #1 New York Times bestseller, ran the gamut from health care to criminal justice, affordable housing to education, voting rights to racial divides. But a decade later, Black men still fall to police bullets and brutality, Black women still die from preventable diseases, Black children still struggle to get a high quality education, the digital divide and environmental inequality still persist, and American cities from Ferguson to Baltimore burn with frustration. In short, the last decade has seen the evaporation of Black wealth, with Black fellow citizens having lost ground in nearly every leading economic category.

2/5/16 Panel

7 hours ago

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  A dancer’s past. A woman’s future. The seductive and lucrative world of strip clubs sets the stage for Naked Influence, a tale about a charismatic exotic dancer who finds herself engulfed in a doomed relationship with a congressman.

The show opened at Capital Repertory Theatre in downtown Albany and runs through February 14th.

The favorite of last year’s NEXT ACT! New Play Summit 3, Naked Influence showcases author Suzanne Bradbeer’s intelligence in examining contemporary stories ripped from the headlines.

Robert Newman plays Dennis, a congressman with a heart of stone. Newman is familiar from a 28-year run as Joshua Lewis on the longest running program in broadcast history, Guiding Light. A two-time Daytime Emmy Award nominee, Newman recently guest starred on Homeland, Criminal Minds, NCIS, and Law and Order: SVU. He has an extensive off-Broadway and regional theatre resume.

Bruce Springsteen
Patrick Harbron

  “The Photography of Bruce Springsteen” is a new exhibit at Soho's Morrison Hotel Gallery, on view through February 9, includes a collection of work from Frank Stefanko, Lynn Goldsmith, Neal Preston, Joel Bernstein, David Gahr, Jim Marchese, and Patrick Harbron. It's the first time these photographers have exhibited together.

The exhibit comes after the December 2015 release of Springsteen's The Ties That Bind: The River Collection, a deluxe box set offering a deep dive into the songs and live experience of the River era (1979–'81).  Springsteen is bringing his “River Tour” to Albany on Monday, February 8th, so we thought it a good time to bring back one of those feature photographers to discuss the photo exhibit, “The Boss” and their own work.

Illustration by ALEXIS BEAUCLAIR
Alexis Beauclair

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities to learn about the practice and process of editorial illustration.

Alexandra Zsigmond is the art director of the New York Times Sunday Review, and we're going to speak with her about how politics and history are represented in editorial art. In addition to her work at the Times, Alexandra is one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ new Public Scholars.

  Tom Daschle and Trent Lott are two of the most prominent senators of recent time. Both served in their respective parties' leadership positions from the 1990s into the current century, and they have almost sixty years of service between them. Their congressional tenure saw the Reagan tax cuts, a deadlocked Senate, the Clinton impeachment, 9/11, and the Iraq War. Despite the tumultuous times, and despite their very real ideological differences, they have always maintained a positive working relationship, one almost unthinkable in today's hyper-partisan climate.

In their book, Crisis Point: Why We Must - and How We Can - Overcome Our Broken Politics in Washington and Across America, Daschle and Lott come together from opposite sides of the aisle to sound an alarm on the current polarization that has made governing all but impossible; never before has the people's faith in government been so dismally low. The senators itemize damaging forces--the permanent campaign, the unprecedented money, the 24/7 news cycle--and offer practical recommendations, pointing the way forward.

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