The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Ellen Hopkins is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eleven young adult novels, as well as the adult novels TrianglesCollateral, and Love Lies Beneath.

Her latest is The You I've Never Known.

For centuries scientists have written off cannibalism as a bizarre phenomenon with little biological significance. Its presence in nature was dismissed as a desperate response to starvation or other life-threatening circumstances, and few spent time studying it. A taboo subject in our culture, the behavior was portrayed mostly through horror movies or tabloids sensationalizing the crimes of real-life flesh-eaters. But the true nature of cannibalism--the role it plays in evolution as well as human history--is even more intriguing (and more normal) than the misconceptions we’ve come to accept as fact.

In Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,zoologist Bill Schutt sets the record straight, debunking common myths and investigating our new understanding of cannibalism’s role in biology, anthropology, and history in the most fascinating account yet written on this complex topic.

Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. You will read about men who were political leaders and men who were activists and cultural tastemakers. These men have been lauded for generations for creating the most exciting and influential city in the world.

But that's not the whole story.

The Women Who Made New York by Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made New York City the cultural epicenter of the world.

Julie Scelfo will be at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck on March 1.

New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik
Office of Congresswoman Elise Stefanik

New York’s 21st Congressional district is one of the largest east of the Mississippi.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican Elise Stefanik concludes her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial FoundationProviding a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on Guilderhaven – a non-profit helping the animal community. They provide low-cost spay/neuter, food, and medical intervention for the companion animals of New York residents and for wildlife. They also assist rescue organizations in this endeavor, with an emphasis on the local community.

To tell us more, we welcome Sue Green, Chair of Guilderhaven.

2/27/17 Panel

23 hours ago

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

Everyone knows that America is 50 states and…some other stuff. Scattered shards in the Pacific and the Caribbean, the not-quite states—American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands—and their 4 million people are often forgotten, even by most Americans. But they’re filled with American flags, U.S. post offices, and Little League baseball games. How did these territories come to be part of the United States? What are they like? And why aren’t they states?

Doug Mach explores these questions in his book, The Not-Quite States of America: Dispatches from the Territories and Other Far-Flung Outposts of the USA.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. This week’s composer is Ludwig van Beethoven.

Lisa Dickey traveled across the whole of Russia three times - in 1995, 2005 and 2015 - making friends in eleven different cities, then coming back again and again to see how their lives had changed. Like the acclaimed British documentary series Seven Up!, she traces the ups and downs of ordinary people’s lives, in the process painting a deeply nuanced portrait of modern Russia.

Her book is Bears in the Streets: Three Journeys across a Changing Russia.

New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik
Office of Congresswoman Elise Stefanik

2016 is just behind us, but another election always looms.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican Elise Stefanik continues her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

In Why Won't You Apologize?: Healing Big Betrayals and Everyday Hurts, renowned psychologist and bestselling author of The Dance of Anger sheds new light on the two most important words in the English language - I’m sorry - and offers a unique perspective on the challenge of healing broken connections and restoring trust.

Dr. Harriet Lerner has been studying apologies—and why some people won’t give them—for more than two decades. Now she offers compelling stories and solid theory that bring home how much the simple apology matters and what is required for healing when the hurt we’ve inflicted (or received) is far from simple.

2/24/17 Panel

Feb 24, 2017

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and author and activist, Barbara Smith.  

Thelma Adams is an established figure in the entertainment industry. For two decades, she has penned celebrity features and film criticism for high-profile publications. She writes a weekly column for the New York Observer.

She joins us to discuss the 89th Academy Awards which will take place this Sunday.

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik
Office of Congresswoman Elise Stefanik

New York’s North Country swung from blue to red this election.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican Elise Stefanik tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what she makes of November’s results.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

2/23/17 Panel

Feb 23, 2017

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao and Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld.

 Japanese Impressions: Color Woodblock Prints from the Rodbell Family Collection is the first exhibition at the Clark to focus on the Institute’s permanent collection of Japanese prints. The exhibition spans more than a century of Japanese color woodblock printing as represented by three generations of artists who produced prints from the 1830s to the 1970s.

We went to The Clark in Williamstown recently to check out the exhibition with Jay A. Clarke, the Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the museum.

In Josh Barkan’s Mexico: Stories  the characters - chef, architect, nurse, high school teacher, painter, beauty queen, classical bass player, plastic surgeon, businessman, mime - are simply trying to lead their lives and steer clear of violence. Yet, inevitably, crime has a way of intruding on their lives all the same.

A surgeon finds himself forced into performing a risky procedure on a narco killer. A teacher struggles to protect lovestruck students whose forbidden romance has put them in mortal peril. A painter’s freewheeling ways land him in the back of a kidnapper’s car. Again and again, the walls between “ordinary life” and cartel violence are shown to be paper thin, and when they collapse the consequences are life-changing.

Congresswoman Nita Lowey
Courtesy of the Office of Congresswoman Nita Lowey

Republicans control official Washington from the top down.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Nita Lowey concludes her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky, and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than a short poem.

Using traditional Aboriginal Australian song lines as a starting point, Dr. Lynne Kelly has identified the powerful memory technique used by our ancestors and indigenous people around the world. In turn, she has then discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret purpose behind the great prehistoric monuments like Stonehenge, which have puzzled archaeologists for so long.

Her book is The Memory Code: The Secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and Other Ancient Monuments.

2/22/17 Panel

Feb 22, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

Throughout its history America has been torn in two by debates over ideals and beliefs. In The Book That Changed America​, Randall Fuller takes us back to one of those turning points, in 1860, with the story of the influence of Charles Darwin’s just-published On the Origin of Species on five American intellectuals, including Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, the child welfare reformer Charles Loring Brace, and the abolitionist Franklin Sanborn.  

Each of these figures seized on the book’s assertion of a common ancestry for all creatures as a powerful argument against slavery, one that helped provide scientific credibility to the cause of abolition.

Lulu Garcia-Navarro
NPR/Stephen Foss

If you’re like me, you usually spend your Sundays with coffee and WAMC, waiting for the NPR Puzzle. And there’s been a change in recent weeks on Weekend Edition Sunday: a new host. Lulu Garcia-Navarro was previously stationed in Rio de Janeiro and has also reported from Mexico and the Middle East. She says it's a unique time in journalism history.

    Suzanna Hermans from Oblong Books and Music joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
Her Every Fear by Peter Swanson
The Impossible Fortress by Jason Rekulak
The Spider and the Fly by Claudia Rowe
Identity Unknown: Rediscovering Seven American Women Artists by Donna Seaman (event in Rhinebeck Saturday 2/25, 6pm)
The Women Who Made New York by Julie Scelfo (event in Rhinebeck Wednesday 3/1, 6pm)
Lost and Found Cat by Doug Kuntz & Amy Shrodes, illustrated by Sue Cornelison
Bunny's Book Club by Annie Silvestro, illustrated by Tatjana Mai-Wyss
We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

Congresswoman Nita Lowey
Courtesy of the Office of Congresswoman Nita Lowey

It turns out many Americans don’t want to lose the Affordable Care Act.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Nita Lowey continues her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

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