The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Brad Gooch is a poet, novelist, and biographer, whose most recent book is Rumi's Secret: The Life of the Sufi Poet of Love. He is the author of ten previous works, including: the memoir Smash Cut; the acclaimed biography of Frank O'Hara, City Poet; and Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor, which was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and New York Times best seller. The recipient of National Endowment for the Humanities and Guggenheim fellowships, he earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University and is Professor of English at William Paterson University in New Jersey.

In Rumi's Secret, Gooch brings to life the man and puts a face to the name Rumi, vividly coloring in his time and place—a world as rife with conflict as our own.

In Anne Makepeace’s new documentary, two Native American judges reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth. By addressing the root causes of crime, they are providing models of restorative justice that are working. Mainstream courts across the country are taking notice.

The film will screen at The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY on Sunday, March 26 at 11 a.m. The screening is presented by FilmWorks Forum.

Anne Makepeace has been a writer, producer, and director of award-winning independent films for more three decades. Tribal Justice, will premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in February 2017, and will culminate in a national PBS broadcast later this year.

Image Provided

Established in 1934 by the Lenox Garden Club, The Berkshire Botanical Garden is a not-for-profit, membership-supported educational organization encompassing 15 acres of cultivated land in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

As un-Spring-like as it feels outside in the region today, we are going to learn about Berkshire Botanical Garden’s spring and summer plans and their The Center House Project expansion.

We are joined by Mike Beck, the Executive Director of The Berkshire Botanical Garden and Matt Larkin, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Jacqueline Kellachan from The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
Exit West by Moshin Hamid
Blitzed: Drugs in The Third Reich by Norman Ohler
South and West by Joan Didion
I Feel Bad. All Day. Every Day. About Everything by Orli Auslander
Radiant Child by Javaka Steptoe
Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets by Kwame Alexander, illustrated by Ekua Holmes

Barney: Grove Press and Barney Rosset, America’s Maverick Publisher and His Battle against Censorship by Michael Rosenthal
The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of The Wild Catskills by Leslie Sharpe

3/24/17 Panel

Mar 24, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, author and activist Barbara Smith, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

The New York State Brewers Association will be holding their fourth annual New York Craft Brewers Festival taking place this Saturday March 25th at the Desmond Hotel in Albany.

The New York Craft Brewers Festival brings together 50 New York Breweries (and brewers) from every region of the state featuring up to 100+ hard to find and award winning beers.

This is a great opportunity to meet the NYS brewers that make the beer, and the owners of the local food scene in the Capital District that are such an important part of the community.

We welcome - Paul Leone, Executive Director New York State Brewers Association. We also welcome Nikki Cavanaugh from Rushing Duck Brewing in Chester NY and Kevin Mullen with Rare Form Brewing.

David Salle is an internationally renowned painter whose work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Museum and National Galarie of Berlin, among many others.   He also has a long-standing involvement with performance working extensively over the last 25 years with choreographer Karole Armitage, creating sets and costumes for many of her ballets and operas.  Salle is also a prolific writer on art. His new book is How To See.

On Wednesday, March 23, he will be featured in the New York Writers Institute The Creative Life Series in conversation with Joe Donahue, live in the Recital Hall at UAlbany at 7pm. 

The Academy of Music Theatre is mounting a new work by playwright Carol Carpenter entitled Sweet, Sweet Spirit on March 24th and 25th at 7:30 p.m.  The play addresses gay bashing and child abuse within a West Texas conservative family whose gay teenage son is beaten into a coma by his father.

Carpenter takes her audience deeper into an exploration of a family struggling with their own fear and heart.  The son, Tyler, who is described as “different,” but not referred to by his family members as gay, affects each of the members of this Southern Christian family in disparate ways.

We are joined Debra J'Anthony, Academy of Music Theatre's Executive Director and Sheila Siragusa, director of Sweet, Sweet Spirit.

The Trump travel ban has been halted again.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Kedi

Upcoming:

·        Liz Longley - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 3/23, 7 PM

·        They Live - Madison Theater, Albany, Thursday-Sunday, 3/23-26, various times

·        Kate Campbell - The Eighth Step at Underground at Proctors, Friday 3/24, 7:30 PM

·        Capital Trash Invasion 2: featuring Tex Railer’s Doomtown, The Televisionaires, Harmonica Lewinsky, and more - The Fuze Box, Albany, Saturday 3/25, 8 PM

·        Mavis Staples - MASS MoCA, North Adams, Mass., Saturday 3/25, 8 PM

·        Hyperion String Quartet - de Blasiis Chamber Music Series/The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls, Sunday 3/26, 3 PM

·        New York Theatre Ballet’s Sleeping Beauty - The Egg, Albany, Sunday 3/26, 3 PM

·        Langhorne Slim - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Sunday 3/26, 8 PM

·        Mitsuko Uchida - Union College Memorial Chapel, Schenectady, Monday 3/27, 7 PM

·        Helena Byrne - Irish American Heritage Museum, Albany, Monday 3/27, 7 PM

New movies:

Wilson, Land of Mine, Power Rangers, The Last Word, CHiPs

3/23/17 Panel

Mar 23, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld, and corporate attorney Rich Honen.

3/22/17 Panel

Mar 22, 2017

In a shortened Roundtable Panel, Alan and Ray discuss what was learned yesterday in the Senate Judiciary Hearings on Judge Neil Gorsuch.

3/20/17 Panel

Mar 20, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain and WAMC Newsman, Ray Graf.

An Iliad At TheRep

Mar 17, 2017

Running now through April 2nd, Cap Rep’s production of An Iliad is a sprawling yarn based on Homer’s epic poem. This Obie Award-winning adaptation spins the familiar tale of gods and goddesses, undying love and battles of The Trojan War told through an original and immediate narrator -- whose knowledge cuts across time -- to bring the past and present together.

We are joined by actor David Barlow, cellist Kathleen Bowman, and director Margaret E. Hall.

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of discussions about women who influenced classical composers. This week we learn about Felix Mendelssohn and "The Swedish Nightingale," Jenny Lind.

Tickling Giants
Tickling Giants

Many Americans, if they’ve heard of the Egyptian Dr. Bassem Youssef, first learned about him on Jon Stewart’s Daily Show a few years ago. Youssef left his gig as a heart surgeon to launch a comedy show that soon got caught up in the turmoil and authoritarianism of the Middle East during the Arab Spring and its aftermath. That’s the subject of Daily Show senior producer Sara Taksler’s documentary Tickling Giants. The film is screening on Tuesday in cities across the U.S., including at The Spectrum in Albany at 7 p.m., as part of what Taksler is calling “Meet A Muslim at the Movies.”

Town meetings have become the new political battleground.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he appreciates the energy.

Mark Ruffalo and Jessica Hecht in The Roundabout Theatre Company revival of 'The Price'
Joan Marcus

  Last night in New York City, the Roundabout Theatre Company revival of Arthur Miller’s The Price opened on Broadway at the American Airlines Theatre. It will run through May 7.

 

The Price deals with familial resentment, lies, misunderstandings and the lasting generational repercussions of The Great Depression through Miller’s signature and definitive playwriting.

Terry Kinney directs the four actor cast -- Mark Ruffalo, Tony Shaloub, Danny Davito (making his Broadway debut), and friend of WAMC, Jessica Hecht.

3/17/17 Panel

Mar 17, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, author and activist Barbara Smith, and Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Listener Essay - I Was Wrong

Mar 16, 2017

Steven Lewis is a former Mentor at SUNY-Empire State College, current member of the Sarah Lawrence College Writing Institute faculty, and longtime freelancer. His new novel, Loving Violet, will be published by Cohill Press in summer 2017.

I Was Wrong

I am beginning this piece in the early days of the United States’ descent into the Dystrumpian Future. So many among us holding our breaths, preparing for the coming repressions, the planetary insults to reason and civilized behavior, the Armageddon-Sans-Rapture that awaits this great country. And it’s already far worse than many of us feared.

Until the late 1960s, tens of thousands of American children suffered crippling birth defects if their mothers had been exposed to rubella, popularly known as German measles, while pregnant; there was no vaccine and little understanding of how the disease devastated fetuses. In June 1962, a young biologist in Philadelphia, using tissue extracted from an aborted fetus from Sweden, produced safe, clean cells that allowed the creation of vaccines against rubella and other common childhood diseases. Two years later, in the midst of a devastating German measles epidemic, his colleague developed the vaccine that would one day wipe out homegrown rubella. The rubella vaccine and others made with those fetal cells have protected more than 150 million people in the United States, the vast majority of them preschoolers. 

Meredith Wadman covered biomedical research politics from Washington for twenty years. She is a reporter at  Science and has written for NatureFortune, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. A graduate of Stanford and Columbia, she began medical school at the University of British Columbia and completed her medical degree as a Rhodes scholar at the University of Oxford.

Her new book is The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease

This Friday and Saturday, The Theatre Institute at Sage will present a staged reading of the rarely-produced play Greenwood: An American Dream Destroyed by Celeste Bedford Walker. The reading is directed by Lynnie Godfrey, the inaugural artist of the Scrimshaw Distinguished Visiting Artist Fund. Godfrey, an actress, singer, director and producer based in New York City, is at Sage for a week-long residency thanks to the generous support of the fund established by The Sage Colleges President Susan Scrimshaw.

Greenwood: An American Dream Destroyed is a drama that tells the story of events surrounding the 1921 race disaster in Greenwood, Oklahoma. Greenwood, the premier Black Boomtown of its era, was referred to as the “Negro Wall Street”, and had successfully achieved complete economic independence from its neighbor Tulsa, Oklahoma. That all ended when 14 blocks of the town were burned down in one night. Follow the progress, success, joy and prosperity of the township of Greenwood and eventually the story of its demise.

Here to tell us more are aforementioned director Lynnie Godfrey and Theare Institute at Sage Artistic Director, Leigh Strimbeck. 

The production of culture was once the domain of artists, but beginning in the early 1900s, the emerging fields of public relations, advertising and marketing transformed the way the powerful communicate with the rest of us. A century later, the tools are more sophisticated than ever, the onslaught more relentless. 

In Culture as Weapon, acclaimed curator and critic Nato Thompson reveals how institutions use art and culture to ensure profits and constrain dissent--and shows us that there are alternatives.

  Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Garth Brooks at the TUC (Sunday)

Upcoming:

·         Blue Velvet - Madison Theater, Albany, Thursday 3/16-Sunday 3/19, various times

·         Photography Regional Select - Albany Center Gallery, opening reception Friday 3/17, 5-9 PM, through April 21

·         David Lindley, Chris Smither - The Egg, Albany, Friday 3/17, 7:30 PM

·         Brian Regan - Palace Theatre, Albany, Friday 3/17, 8 PM

·         Shawn Wayans - The Funny Bone, Albany, Friday 3/17, 7:30 & 10 PM; Sat 3/18, 7 & 9:45 PM

·         Lunasa - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Saturday 3/18, 8 PM

·         Jimmy Webb: The Glen Campbell Years - Colonial Theatre, Pittsfield, Mass., Saturday 3/18, 8 PM

·         Barbara Nissman (pianist; Ginastera, Prokofiev, Liszt, Bartok) - Troy Chromatic Concerts/Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Sunday 3/19, 3 PM

·         Albany Symphony Orchestra: Captain American, Musical Avenger - Palace Theatre, Albany, Sunday 3/19, 3 PM

·         The Red Shoes - GE Theatre at Proctors, Monday 3/20, 1:30, 4:15 and 7 PM

New movies: Beauty and the Beast, The Sense of an Ending

3/16/17 Panel

Mar 16, 2017

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois, and Editor of The Daily Gazette, Judy Patrick.

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