The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Today’s students face a challenging paradox: the digital tools they need to complete their work are often the source of their biggest distractions. Students can quickly become overwhelmed trying to manage the daily confluence of online interactions with schoolwork, extracurricular activities, and family life. Written by author and educator Ana Homayoun, "Social Media Wellness" is the first book to successfully decode the new language of social media for parents and educators and provide pragmatic solutions to help students focus and manage distractions. 

Ana Homayoun is a noted teen and millennial expert, author, school consultant, speaker and educator. Her newest book is "Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World."

The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway cover
Scribner

Ernest Hemingway is rightly celebrated for his indelible novels, but the 20th century titan was writing short stories from his high school days until almost the end. Many are well known to readers, like the Nick Adams stories and The Snows of Kilimanjaro. Others not as much. Like with his most famous novels, Hemingway was an inveterate editor of his short stories, often returning to revise the text after years. Now, you can see that rigorous process play out in the Hemingway Library edition of The Short Stories, published by Scribner. The book features a foreword by Seán Hemingway, the author’s grandson and a curator at The Met.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Black Panther"

Upcoming:
Troy Night Out: The Amazing Race Trivia Night - Downtown Troy, Friday 2/23, 5-9 PM
Mile Twelve - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Friday 2/23, 8 PM
Shemekia Copeland - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Friday 2/23, 9 PM
Shelby Lynne, Teddy Thompson - The Egg, Albany, Saturday 2/24, 8 PM
Sinkane - MASS MoCA, Club B10, North Adams, Mass., Saturday 2/24, 8 PM
Pretty Much the Best Comedy Show: Adrienne Iapalucci - Proctors, Schenectady, Saturday 2/24, 8 PM
Soovin Kim, violin; Paul Watkins, cello; Gloria Chen, piano - (Beethoven, Brahms, Pierre Jalbert) - Union College Memorial Chapel, Schenectady, Sunday 2/25, 3 PM
Dropkick Murphys, Agnostic Front, Bim Skala Bim - Albany Capital Center, Albany, Sunday 2/25, 7:30 PM
"Casablanca" - Palace Theatre, Albany, Monday 2/26, 7 PM
Staatskapelle Weimar with pianist Sunwook Kim - (Beethoven, Brahms, Wagner, Richard Strauss) - Troy Chromatics Concerts, Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Wednesday 2/28, 7:30 PM

New movies: "Annihilation," "Game Night," "Happy End," "Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool"

2/22/18 Panel

2 hours ago

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois and Chairman of Capital District Latinos Dan Irizarry.

BJ Leiderman
Mark Edward Atkinson

We’re about to talk to a person whose work is heard multiple times a day on WAMC — but rarely his voice. Until now. BJ Leiderman, the composer behind several public radio theme songs including those for Morning Edition, Marketplace, Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, is out with his first album, called BJ. The album is both funny and serious, cheeky and earnest. And it even features Bela Fleck on banjo.

Known as the king of the rant, Lewis Black uses his trademark style of comedic yelling and animated finger-pointing to skewer anything and anyone that gets under his skin. His comedic brilliance lies in his ability to make people laugh at the absurdities of life, with topics that include current events, social media, politics and anything else that exposes the hypocrisy and madness he sees in the world.

His new tour "The Joke's On Us" comes to UPAC in Kingston, New York, on Saturday, February 24.

The president has released his infrastructure plan.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch wraps up his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Nobody expected the vice president, a New York political hack, to be president. And after President James A. Garfield was shot in 1881, nobody expected Chester A. Arthur to become a strong and effective president, a courageous anti-corruption reformer, and an early civil rights advocate.

Despite his promising start as a young man, by his early fifties Chester A. Arthur was known as the crooked crony of New York machine boss Roscoe Conkling. For years Arthur had been perceived as unfit to govern, not only by critics and the vast majority of his fellow citizens but by his own conscience. As President James A. Garfield struggled for his life, Arthur knew better than his detractors that he failed to meet the high standard a president must uphold.

Scott S. Greenberger is a journalist, author and the executive editor of Stateline, the daily news service of The Pew Charitable Trusts. His newest book is "The Unexpected President: The Life and Times of Chester A. Arthur." Greenberger will be at Union College in Schenectady, NY on Thursday, February 22nd - to deliver the college’s Founders Day keynote address.

2/21/18 Panel

Feb 21, 2018

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultants Theresa Bourgeois and Joe Bonilla, and Berkshire Eagle reporter Jenn Smith.

  Despite the outpouring of books, movies, museums, memorials, and courses devoted to the Holocaust, a coherent explanation of why such ghastly carnage erupted from the heart of civilized Europe in the twentieth century still seems elusive even seventy years later. 

Peter Hayes' Why? dispels many misconceptions and answers some of the most basic, yet vexing, questions that remain: why the Jews and not another ethnic group? Why the Germans? Why such a swift and sweeping extermination? Why didn’t more Jews fight back more often? Why didn’t they receive more help?

Peter Hayes is professor of history and German and Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Professor of Holocaust Studies Emeritus at Northwestern University and chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

  This week's Book Picks come to us from Emily Crowe at The Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, Massachusetts.

List:
“Only Child: A Novel” by Rhiannon Navin
“I Am, I Am, I Am: Seventeen Brushes with Death” by Maggie O’Farrell
“Things That Make White People Uncomfortable” by Michael Bennett
“LOVE” by Matt de la Pena, illustrated by Loren Long
“The Dangerous Art of Blending In” by Angelo Surmelis
“Anatomy of a Miracle: A Novel” by Jonathan Miles
“Islandborn” by Junot Diaz, illustrated by Leo Espinosa

The Green Mountain State recently lost a giant.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Adam Winkler is a professor at UCLA School of Law, where he specializes in American constitutional law. His scholarship has been cited by the Supreme Court of the United States and his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, New Republic, Atlantic, Slate, and Scotusblog.

In "We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights," Winkler reveals how American businesses won equal rights and transformed the Constitution to serve the ends of capital. Corporations - like minorities and women - have had a civil rights movement of their own, and now possess nearly all the same rights as ordinary people.

2/20/18 Panel

Feb 20, 2018

         The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain and the Empire Report’s J.P. Miller.

George Saunders is the author of eight books, including the story collections “Pastoralia” and “Tenth of December,” which was a finalist for the National Book Award. His first novel, “Lincoln in the Bardo,” was released last year and won the Man Book Prize.

The book visits the cemetery where President Abraham and First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln’s son, Willie, has just been entombed. The other characters are the less-recently dead who encourage the boy to cross over. “Lincoln in the Bardo” is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. 

W.E.B. Du Bois was one of the most important African-American activists during the first half of the 20th century. He co-founded the NAACP, supported Pan-Africanism, and was the first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Du Bois was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts 150 years ago this month and Great Barrington's Du Bois anniversary celebration began on January 15 and will continue throughout 2018.

Here to tell us more are Dennis Powell, President of the Berkshire County Branch NAACP;and member of the Steering Committee Du Bois Lecture Series; Professor Dr. Whitney Battle-Baptiste, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Du Bois Center at UMass Amherst; Ted Thomas, poet and teacher who directs the student Du Bois spoken word programs; and Barbara Dean, musician, performer, and radio DJ who has worked on Du Bois issues and promotion in Great Barrington for about three decades.

It’s a busy time in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Joseph Califano, Jr. spent thirty years in Washington at the top of the Pentagon, on the White House staff as chief domestic advisor to the President, and in the Cabinet. He worked as an attorney for The Washington Post during Watergate and has represented clients as varied as the Black Panthers and Coca Cola.

His new book, “Our Damaged Democracy: We the People Must Act,” is a primer on the three branches of government that reveals the political, cultural, constitutional, technological, and institutional changes that he believes render our government completely dysfunctional. He says there is an urgent need to fix our democracy before it’s too late.

2/16/18 Panel

Feb 16, 2018

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, and Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti .

A wise, warm, and witty gift for new (and gently used) parents seeking to raise positive, thoughtful children, this alphabet book brims with the advice only those who've been there can give. From "D is for Dog" (get one) to "P is for Praise" (do it often but appropriately) to "R is for Romance" (keep it alive after the kids come), each mini essay is coupled with a smart, letter-appropriate full-color photograph in these delightfully grown-up ABCs.

Deborah Copaken is an author and photojournalist. Her newest book is The ABC's of Parenthood: An Alphabet of Parenting Advice.

Democrats in Massachusetts will have their hands full trying to unseat Gov. Charlie Baker.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, wraps up his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: “Hostiles,” “Paddington 2”

Upcoming:

Time for Three - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Thursday 2/15, 7:30 PM

The Next Women of Country: Sara Evans featuring Raelynn & Kalie Shorr - Palace Theatre, Albany, Thursday 2/15, 8 PM

They Are Waiting for You: Laure Prouvost with Sam Belinfante & Pierre Droulers - EMPAC Theater, Troy, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Bridgman Packer Dance - The Egg, Albany, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Loudon Wainwright III - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Birdland All-Stars featuring Tommy Igoe - Proctors, Schenectady, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Warren Miller’s Line of Descent - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Mass., Saturday 2/17, 7:30 PM

Eddie Izzard: Believe Me Tour - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Saturday 2/17, 8 PM

Bindlestiff Cirkus Cabin Fever Cabaret (Adult Oriented Show) - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Saturday 2/17, 9 PM

“Looney Tunes”: “Bugs, The Beginning and Beyond” - Capitol Theatre, Rome, Monday 2/19-Saturday 2/24 at 3 PM; Saturday also at 7 PM

New movies: “The Insult,” “Black Panther,” “Early Man”

2/15/18 Panel

Feb 15, 2018

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, Siena College Comparative Politics Professor Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and Editor of The Daily Gazette Judy Patrick.

Marilyn Yalom is a senior scholar at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University, and the author of "A History of the Wife," among other books.

In "The Amorous Heart," Marilyn Yalom tracks the heart metaphor and heart iconography across two thousand years, through Christian theology, pagan love poetry, medieval painting, Shakespearean drama, Enlightenment science, and into the present. She argues that the symbol reveals a tension between love as romantic and sexual on the one hand, and as religious and spiritual on the other.

Daphne de Marneffe, PhD, is a psychologist and the author of "Maternal Desire: On Children, Love, and the Inner Life." In her clinical practice, she offers psychotherapy to couples and individuals. She teaches and lectures widely on marriage, couple therapy, adult development, and parenthood. 

In her new book, "The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together," she explores the pushes and pulls of midlife marriage, where an individual's need to develop can crash headlong into the demands of a relationship.

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