The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Bill Cosby, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

"Book Picks" lists are here.

apple.com

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools. His books include: Swift for Dummies and iOS App Development for Dummies.

He is our tech guru and joins us today to talk about wearable technology.

  For a long time, veteran environmental journalist Fred Pearce thought in stark terms about invasive species: they were the evil interlopers spoiling pristine “natural” ecosystems. Most conservationists and environmentalists share this view. But what if the traditional view of ecology is wrong—what if true environmentalists should be applauding the invaders?

In The New Wild, Pearce goes on a journey across six continents to rediscover what conservation in the twenty-first century should be about. The case for keeping out alien species, he finds, looks increasingly flawed. As Pearce argues, mainstream environmentalists are right that we need a rewilding of the earth, but they are wrong if they imagine that we can achieve that by reengineering ecosystems.

  The impacts of 9/11 are still felt 14 years later.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about his work to keep first responders in good health.

  Sir Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential educators. Listed by Fast Company as “one of the world’s elite thinkers on creativity and innovation,” he advises governments, corporations, and leading cultural institutions.

In his new book, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education, he shows parents, educators and administrators how they can transform the way our schools work. He says - by focusing first on the students and teachers (not test scores), schools can evolve into the organic, personal learning environments they deserve to be.

  Jacqueline Kellachan from The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
On The Move by Oliver Sacks
Man in Profile: Joseph Mitchel of The New Yorker by Thomas Kunkel
The Year My Mother Came Back by Alice Eve Cohen (Author event, Saturday, May 2nd, 5PM)
Waking Up To The Dark: Ancient Wisdom For A Sleepless Age by Clark Strand (Author event at Kleinert/James Arts Center, Saturday, May 2, 7PM)
The Secret History of Kindness: Learning From How Dogs Learn by Melissa Holbrooke Pierson (Author event, Saturday, May 9th, 4PM)
Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure by Nadia Spiegelman & Sergio Garcia Sanchez
The Farmer and The Clown by Marla Frazee

4/28/15 Panel

3 hours ago

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

Scheduled topics include: Baltimore Violence; Nepal; SCOTUS on Same-Sex Marriage; Pope on Climate Change; Japan & US Cooperation.

We hear all the time about weight gain, weight loss, how Americans are the heaviest we have ever been, and myriad plans for remedying our egregious fatness. Yet, what if much of what we are told, and what we believe, simply is not true?

Writer Harriet Brown set out to explore our relentless obsession with weight and thinness in the new book Body of Truth: How Science, History, and Culture Drive Our Obsession with Weight--and What We Can Do about It.

We’re constantly warned about the dangers of being overweight or obese; even the government has proclaimed a war on obesity, demanding that steps be taken to end the epidemic. Our society glorifies the slender and super-fit and our concerns over body image boosts a $54 billion diet industry. Yet, according to the new science of obesity, the lean models and the mean athletes may be heading to an early grave.

In his new book, The Obesity Paradox: When Thinner Means Sicker and Heavier Means Healthier, cardiologist and researcher, Carl J. Lavie, reveals the truth behind body fat’s effect.

  

  April 1975. During the chaotic final days of the Vietnam War, as the North Vietnamese Army closed in on Saigon, South Vietnamese resistance crumbled. City after city and village after village fell to the North while the few U.S. diplomats and military operatives still in the country contemplated withdrawal.

With the lives of thousands of South Vietnamese hanging in the balance, those in control faced an impossible choice--who would go and who would be left behind to face brutality, imprisonment or even death. Directed by Rory Kennedy and airing in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, Last Days in Vietnam premieres on American Experience tomorrow night from 9:00-11:00 p.m. on PBS.

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