The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

"Book Picks" lists are here.

  Yesterday marked the 125th anniversary of the death of artist Vincent van Gogh.

For van Gogh, nature was the defining subject of his art. Over the course of his short but intense working life, Van Gogh studied and depicted nature in all its forms and there is a fantastic and extensive exhibition of this work at The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown Massachusetts through September 13th.

The exhibition is curated by Richard Kendall - our guide on this audio tour.

hbo.com

  America is the most punitive nation in the world, handing out historically harsh sentences that largely dispense with the concept of rehabilitation.

Alan and Susan Raymond - Oscar and Emmy winners for HBO’s I Am a Promise: The Children of Stanton Elementary School - explore the reality of “the other death penalty” in Toe Tag Parole: To Live and Die on Yard A.

Featuring exclusive, unprecedented access, Toe Tag Parole: To Live And Die On Yard A was shot entirely at California State Prison, Los Angeles County, a maximum-security facility in the Mojave Desert. The documentary debuts on Monday, August 3rd at 9PM on HBO.

  The Supreme Court wrapped up its term last month by deciding several important cases.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays delves into the decisions with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Do you believe that "winners never quit and quitters never win"? Do you tend to hang in longer than you should, even when you're unhappy?

Our culture usually defines quitting as admitting defeat, but persistence isn't always the answer: When a goal is no longer useful, we need to be able to quit to get the most out of life. In Quitting, bestselling author Peg Streep and psychotherapist Alan Bernstein reveal simple truths that apply to goal setting and achievement in all areas of life, including work, love, and relationships.

  Dan-el Padilla Peralta is one of millions of young undocumented men and women brought to the country as children. He is also a gifted scholar who made his way to some of the world’s most elite schools.

Peralta’s new book is: Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey From A Homeless Shelter To The Ivy League evocatively recounts Peralta’s journey from the New York City shelter system to the Ivy League.

7/30/15 Panel

8 hours ago

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  At their childhood home after their mother’s funeral, Nate gets high and Jeremy focusses on work waiting for him in the city -- both brothers trying to send their minds anywhere but where they are.

This is the starting point of A Little More Alive - a Musical Theatre Lab production currently running on Barrington Stage Company’s St. Germain Stage in Pittsfield, MA through August 8th.

The musical, directed by Sheryl Kaller and featuring actors Van Hughes, Daniel Jenkins, Nicolette Robinson, Michael Tacconi, and Emily Walton, tells the story of dealing not only with the devastation of loss but the revelation that the person who has died had a secret. A secret that warps all of their memories of her and both monumental and mundane moment in their lives.

Nick Blaemire wrote the show - book, music, and lyrics. We speak with him here about the process.

 Jackie Mercurio lives with her husband, five children, and black Lab in New York. She was recently named Winner of the Good Housekeeping Memoir Contest (2014). Her website iswww.jackiemercurio.com

  I Saw My Neighbor On the Train and I Didn’t Even Smile is a world premiere play by Suzanne Heathcote currently running at The Berkshire Theatre Group’s Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge, MA. The production is directed by Jackson Gay world premiere, co-produced by New Neighborhood.

This is Rebecca’s life: she wakes up, eats a sensible breakfast, wraps herself in three layers, drives to the train station, commutes to her bookkeeping job in the city, watches the clock, goes home, cooks dinner for her domineering mother, watches TV, and falls asleep grieving for her dead dog. Every day is the same as the next until Rebecca’s underachieving brother begs her to take care of her troubled niece—and she does what she always does—she lets it happen. In an unforgivingly bitter month, three generations of women with nothing in common, except a deeply buried ache, try to keep the cold away.

I Saw My Neighbor On the Train and I Didn’t Even Smile features longtime BTG artist Keira Naughton as Rebecca, as well as Linda Gehringer, and Ariana Venturi who join us.

*The audio for this interview is lower quality than our other posts. Our first recording failed and we had to retrieve this from a back-up source. 

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