The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Bill Cosby, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

"Book Picks" lists are here.

  Stanford psychiatrist Dr. Irvin Yalom has practiced in the area of group psychotherapy for over 50 years, and often writes about his personal experiences with his patients.

In his new book Creatures of a Day: And Other Tales of Psychotherapy, he deals with questions of mortality, from his work with terminally ill patients to his own fear of dying.

He joins us to talk about his career as a psychotherapist and what he's learned from his patients in the process. 

  When Emma Sky volunteered to help rebuild Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003, she had little idea what she was getting in to. Her assignment was only supposed to last three months. She went on to serve there longer than any other senior military or diplomatic figure, giving her an unrivaled perspective of the entire conflict.

  We’re often told that the United States is, was, and always has been a Christian nation. But in One Nation Under God, historian Kevin M. Kruse reveals that the idea of “Christian America” is an invention—and a relatively recent one at that.

As Kruse argues, the belief that America is fundamentally and formally a Christian nation originated in the 1930s when businessmen enlisted religious activists in their fight against FDR’s New Deal. Corporations from General Motors to Hilton Hotels bankrolled conservative clergymen, encouraging them to attack the New Deal as a program of “pagan statism” that perverted the central principle of Christianity: the sanctity and salvation of the individual. Their campaign for “freedom under God” culminated in the election of their close ally Dwight Eisenhower in 1952.

  Some Congressional Democrats are at odds with the White House over the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he opposes the deal.

Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we are talking with John Sisko, Professor of Philosophy and Faculty Fellow in the Humanities and Social Sciences at The College of New Jersey, who has been co-directing a yearlong program exploring the topic of economic justice. The program is entitled Exploring Economic Justice: New Jersey, the Nation, and the World.

Dr. Sisko's project has been supported by a grant from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, which has allowed a number of political scientists, economists, philosophers, historians, and other humanities scholars, as well as local communities, to weigh in on the topic, leading to conversations, not only about our society's basic values, but also about the ways in which our norms and policies for determining the distribution of economic resources may impact and shape the long-term welfare of our society.

Twenty years old and in love, Phyllis Chesler embarked on an adventure that lasted more than a half-century. Shortly after arriving in Afghanistan with her Afghan bridegroom, the authorities took away her American passport, and she became the property of her husband’s family.

5/1/15 Panel

May 1, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  In That’s Not English by Erin Moore, the seemingly superficial differences between British and American English open the door to a deeper exploration of a historic and fascinating cultural divide.

American by birth, Moore is a former book editor who specialized in spotting British books—including Eats, Shoots & Leaves—for the US market. She’s spent the last seven years living in England with her Anglo American husband and a small daughter with an English accent.

  Mary Higgins Clark has been publishing bestsellers for 40 years. 2015 marks the 40th anniversary of the publication of Where are the Children?, the book that launched her career. She is celebrating by releasing a record-breaking three books beginning with the novella, Death Wears A Beauty Mask.

The book is a compilation that revisits the short stories from Clark’s career, from her first-ever published story – 1956’s “Stowaway” – to classic tales featuring Alvirah and Willy, My Gal Sunday and more.

  The Thomas Cole National Historic Site and The Olana Partnership/Olana State Historic Site announced today that they will co-host a landmark exhibition of contemporary art to highlight the pivotal role that the two historic properties – and the artists who lived and worked there – played in shaping America’s culture of contemporary art. The exhibition – “River Crossings: Contemporary Art Comes Home” – will open on May 3rd and run through November 1st.

  The exhibition is curated by Stephen Hannock, the celebrated painter, and Jason Rosenfeld, PhD, the art historian who recently curated two enormously popular exhibitions at Tate Britain in London and the National Gallery in Washington, DC.

Here to tell us more are Betsy Jacks, Director of the Thomas Cole National Historic Site and Mark Prezorski, Landscape Curator at Olana.

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