The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

  In Mastering Homebrew: The Complete Guide to Brewing Delicious Beer, Randy Mosher lays out what it takes to create stellar beers at home.

Leveraging his wide experience as a homebrewer, lecturer at the Siebel Institute brewing school and now as a creative consultant and partner in several commercial breweries, Mosher has created a comprehensive homebrewing book that will enlighten, entertain, provoke and most of all help you brew fantastic beer.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock speaks with Yehuda Hanani about his busy summer in the Catskills and in China.

  For the fourth straight year, Basilica Hudson’ s Founders and Creative Directors Melissa Auf der Maur and Tony Stone are working in collaboration with Pitchfork Managing Editor Brandon Stosuy and Brian DeRan of Leg Up Management to program Basilica SoundScape.

Basilica SoundScape is a carefully curated weekend that’s been called “the anti­festival” for offering of a thoughtful mix of music, visual art, and literature.

SoundScape runs from September 11th through 13th at Basilica Hudson. Melissa Auf der Maur and Brandon Stosuy join us this morning to tell us more. In addition to his work on Basilica SoundScape - is Managing Editor at Pitchfork, a Music Curator for MoMA/PS1.

  Hudson Valley World Affairs Council will be hosting a lecture at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum on Wednesday, September 9th featuring Tom Nichols - Professor of National Security Affairs at the US Naval War College in Newport, R.I.

He will speak on "The U.S. and Russia Today: New Cold War, Hot War, or Reconciliation?” The discussion will be about US-Russian relations, focusing on the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, the conflict in Syria, the Iran nuclear deal and the future of NATO.

He is also a five-time undefeated Jeopardy! champion, and as one of the all-time top players of the game, he was invited back to play in the 2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions.

  Legendary "space statesman" Buzz Aldrin is a vital advocate for the continuing quest to push the boundaries of the universe as we know it.

As a pioneering astronaut who first set foot on the moon during mankind's first landing of Apollo 11--and as an aerospace engineer who designed an orbital rendezvous technique critical to future planetary landings--Aldrin has a vision, and in his new book, Mission to Mars: My Vision for Space Exploration, he plots out the path he proposes, taking humans to Mars by 2035.

  In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States.

Award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us that Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day.

9/4/15 Panel

5 hours ago

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Listener Essay - No Flies On Me

Sep 3, 2015

  This listener essay is by C.D. Nelsen.

How much do we think we know about the First Amendment? How many of us have looked at and considered the full text? More than likely we rely not on our own reading of the document and its various clauses, but on our Supreme Court’s interpretations and rulings to flesh out its true intent. But, what if the Supreme Court got it wrong?

Burt Neuborne, a former legal director of the ACLU, who has argued many cases before the Supreme Court, contends that oftentimes they have gotten it wrong. In his new book, Madison's Music: On Reading the First Amendment, Neuborne demonstrates that by failing to relate to the text as a coherent whole, the court has incrementally and collectively warped the original intent of the First Amendment.

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