The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Bill Cosby, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

"Book Picks" lists are here.

  Historian Jonathan Schneer joins us to talk about his new book on Winston Churchill and the politics of the Second World War, Ministers at War.

Schneer says while Churchill’s most notable contribution was to rally his embattled country behind the war effort, he highlights yet another major achievement: the putting together and managing of the domestic coalition that allowed Britain to mobilize all of its resources for war.

The team he put together was extremely talented, but they were also ambitious, self-confident, and opinionated.

  Partisanship is at an all-time high in Washington.

But in today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that on energy efficiency, Congress is ready to cooperate.

camersonesposito.com

  Stand-up comedian, Cameron Esposito, will perform at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA at 8pm this coming Saturday.

Esposito has been named a "Comic to Watch" by LA Weekly, Time Out Los Angeles, Jezebel, Los Angeles Magazine and Cosmopolitan Magazine. She hosts Put Your Hands Together - a weekly stand-up showcase and podcast out of UCB in Los Angeles, and co-hosts Wham Bam Pow an action and scifi moviecast. Her recent album is entitled Same Sex Symbol.

Her bi-weekly column for The Onion’s AV Club is Who In The World Is Cameron Esposito?

  Lynsey Addario was just finding her way as a young photographer when September 11 changed the world. One of the few photojournalists with experience in Afghanistan, she got the call to return and cover the American invasion.

Addario finds a way to travel with a purpose. She photographs the Afghan people before and after the Taliban reign, the civilian casualties and misunderstood insurgents of the Iraq War, as well as the burned villages and countless dead in Darfur. She exposes a culture of violence against women in the Congo and tells the riveting story of her headline-making kidnapping by pro-Qaddafi forces in the Libyan civil war.

She writes about her experiences in her memoir, It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War.

5/4/15 Panel

May 4, 2015

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Editor of The Daily Gazette, Judy Patrick, and Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Scheduled topics include: Skelos Arrests, Ben Carson on President Obama, David Goldberg death, Baltimore Curfew.

  Stanford psychiatrist Dr. Irvin Yalom has practiced in the area of group psychotherapy for over 50 years, and often writes about his personal experiences with his patients.

In his new book Creatures of a Day: And Other Tales of Psychotherapy, he deals with questions of mortality, from his work with terminally ill patients to his own fear of dying.

He joins us to talk about his career as a psychotherapist and what he's learned from his patients in the process. 

  When Emma Sky volunteered to help rebuild Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003, she had little idea what she was getting in to. Her assignment was only supposed to last three months. She went on to serve there longer than any other senior military or diplomatic figure, giving her an unrivaled perspective of the entire conflict.

  We’re often told that the United States is, was, and always has been a Christian nation. But in One Nation Under God, historian Kevin M. Kruse reveals that the idea of “Christian America” is an invention—and a relatively recent one at that.

As Kruse argues, the belief that America is fundamentally and formally a Christian nation originated in the 1930s when businessmen enlisted religious activists in their fight against FDR’s New Deal. Corporations from General Motors to Hilton Hotels bankrolled conservative clergymen, encouraging them to attack the New Deal as a program of “pagan statism” that perverted the central principle of Christianity: the sanctity and salvation of the individual. Their campaign for “freedom under God” culminated in the election of their close ally Dwight Eisenhower in 1952.

  Some Congressional Democrats are at odds with the White House over the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he opposes the deal.

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