The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Shakespeare & Company was founded in 1978 and since then they’ve been presenting world-class classical and contemporary theater with a focus on none other than The Bard of Avon in Lenox, MA.

The season includes three Shakespeare plays: The Merchant of Venice, The Two Gentlemen of Verona and Twelfth Night, plus Regional Premieres by three women playwrights: of Or, by Liz Duffy Adams; The Taming by Lauren Gunderson and Ugly Lies the Bone by Lindsey Ferrentino, a bracing drama fresh from an acclaimed Off-Broadway production.

Additional titles include Sotto Voce by Pulitzer Prize-winner Nilo Cruz, and the return of Stephan Wolfert in Cry "Havoc!", and a new adaption of Aphra Behn’s Emperor of the Moon by Jenna Ware.

Ariel Bock and Jonathan Croy are serving as co-interim Artistic Directors at Shakespeare & Company. They join us along with Daniella Varon who is directing Ugly Lies the Bone

Tony Award-winning Fiorello! is a big-hearted look at Mayor La Guardia and his battle for the people of New York City. With music and lyrics by Tony Award-winners Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick and book by Tony Award and Drama Desk-Winner George Abbott and Jerome Weidman, the Berkshire Theatre Group production is directed by Playwrights Horizons founder, Bob Moss. Fiorello! is one of only nine musicals to have been awarded the esteemed Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Berkshire Theatre Group presents Fiorello! through July 23rd on their Unicorn Theater in Stockbridge.

Cast members Katie Birenboim and Austin Lombardi join us now. They play Marie and the title character, Fiorello, respectively. 

  A year ago, the notion of a Donald Trump White House was little more than a lark. Things have changed.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Paul Tonko — a Democrat from the 20th district — talks politics with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

  Herbert Clark Hoover was the thirty-first President of the United States. He served one term, from 1929 to 1933. Often considered placid, passive, unsympathetic, and even paralyzed by national events, Hoover faced an uphill battle in the face of the Great Depression.

Many historians dismiss him as merely ineffective. But in Herbert Hoover in the White House,Charles Rappleye draws on rare and intimate sources—memoirs and diaries and thousands of documents kept by members of his cabinet and close advisors—to reveal a very different figure than the one often portrayed. The real Hoover, argues Rappleye, just lacked the tools of leadership.

  New England in the late nineteenth century was home to a set of high-spirited and ambitious writers who were, for the first time, creating a distinctly American literature. From this close-knit literary society emerged Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne, who were known to be friends. In The Whale: A Love Story, novelist Mark Beauregard explores the boundaries of this friendship.

Through a nuanced reading of Melville’s real letters and other original sources, Beauregard offers the fictionalized story of two men who shared a deep, emotionally charged bond that may have transformed the writing—and meaning—of Moby-Dick. Scholars, academics, and essayists have written about Melville and Hawthorne’s relationship, trying to suss out what may have really happened between them.

6/22/16 Panel

Jun 22, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond

Listener Essay - My Rock

Jun 21, 2016

  Jackie Mercurio lives with her husband, five children, and black Lab in New York. She is a freelance writer and editor, who teaches at Concordia College and the Sarah Lawrence College Writing Institute.

My Rock

When I plant flowers near my grandfather's grave, my trowel strikes rock, and I think of the many years I have planted flowers right here in this very spot and have never encountered it. I dig around the stone. I scoop it from the earth. I roll it onto my hand. The rock is smooth and round, slightly smaller than my open palm, and with my index finger I brush away dirt, wondering if it's been buried here all along, the same three decades as my grandfather.

  Her Again is an intimate look at the artistic coming-of-age of the greatest actress of her generation, from the homecoming float at her suburban New Jersey high school, through her early days on the stage at Vassar College and the Yale School of Drama during its golden years, to her star-making roles in The Deer Hunter, Manhattan, and Kramer vs. Kramer. 

New Yorker contributor Michael Schulman brings into focus Meryl’s heady rise to stardom on the New York stage; her passionate, tragically short-lived love affair with fellow actor John Cazale; her marriage to sculptor Don Gummer; and her evolution as a young woman of the 1970s wrestling with changing ideas of feminism, marriage, love, and sacrifice.

When our tech guru, Jesse Feiler is here – we talk quite a bit about Apple Technologies. This morning we are going to focus on news from Microsoft.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

  The Northeast has America’s oldest infrastructure.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock there is some good news on the rail front. 

Brilliant Traces, by Cindy Lou Johnson is a roller-coaster of a play about feelings of isolation and people's need to be understood. Both comic and anguished, Brilliant Traces is set in a recluse's cabin in an Alaskan blizzard where a runaway bride seeks shelter.

Performing Arts of Woodstock is opening a production of the play at the Mescal Hornbeck Community Center this week.

The production is directed by Sande Shurin and stars Maria Elena Maurin as Rosannah. They join us along with President of Performing Arts of Woodstock, Adele Calcavecchio.

 

Today's Book Picks list comes from Rachel Person of The Northshire Bookstore.

List:
They May Not Mean To, But They Do by Cathleen Schine
Be Frank With Me by Julia Claiborne Johnson
The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick
Cook Korean! A Comic Book with Recipes by Robin Ha (to be released 7/5)
Just My Luck by  Cammie McGovern
The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle
The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubraker Bradley

6/21/16 Panel

Jun 21, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond

WAMC Podcasts

Jun 20, 2016

  On-demand isn't all there is - but it is important. We're making sure that WAMC is on track in providing our radio content - and more - to you when and where you choose. 

Patrick Garrett and Ashleigh Kinsey join us to tell us more about WAMC Podcasts - which you can find on iTunes, Stitcher , and the Google Play store.

It's 2016 and podcasts have been out for over a decade. What makes a podcast a podcast? We delve into that and more with WNYC's Chief Content Officer Dean Capello. 

The Mount
David-Dashiell / edithwharton.org

  The Mount is a turn-of-the-century home, designed and built by Edith Wharton in 1902 in Lenox, MA. A National Historic Landmark, today The Mount is a cultural center that celebrates the intellectual, artistic and humanitarian legacy of Edith Wharton.

The Mount’s executive director, Susan Wissler, joins us now to tell us what they have coming up this summer. 

  We’re still learning about the victims of the Orlando shooting at a gay nightclub.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the U.S. should be proud of its recent record on LGBT rights. 

  The Boys in the Boat: The True Story of an American Team's Epic Journey to Win Gold at the 1936 Olympics by Daniel James Brown tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

First released in 2013, the best-selling book has been released in a Young Readers Adaptation by Viking Books.

Berkshire Sculling Association in Pittsfield is hosting John Biglow, member of the 1984 Olympic rowing team. John has developed a talk around the The Boys in the Boat book, which he’ll be presenting at the Duffin Theater in Lenox on Sunday June 26 at 2:30.

  Now in his mid-seventies, Russell Banks has indulged his wanderlust for more than half a century.

In Voyager, Russell Banks, a lifelong explorer, shares highlights from his travels: interviewing Fidel Castro in Cuba; motoring to a hippie reunion with college friends in Chapel Hill, North Carolina; eloping to Edinburgh, with his fourth wife, Chase; driving a sunset orange metallic Hummer down Alaska’s Seward Highway.

Russell Banks will be at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs on Friday, June 24th.

6/20/16 Panel

Jun 20, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The Fenimore Art Museum is currently filled with a wide-range of exciting exhibits featuring world-renowned artists such as Ansel Adams, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler among others.

The exhibitions include: Ansel Adams: Early Works (through September 18th), Traditions of Celebration and Ritual: The Thaw Collection of American Indian Art & A New York View: Country Landscapes by Robert Schneider (both through December 31st.) And Project 562: Portraits of Native America Now (through September 19th).

The summer season is highlighted by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec in Bohemian Paris (which includes La Boheme costumes from The Metropolitan Opera, through September 5th), The Perfection of Harmony: The Art of James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Featuring Lithographs from the Steven Block Collection at the Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky (through October 2nd), Scott McKowen’s Shakespeare Illustrations (through – September 5th.)

Fenimore Art Museum curators Michelle Murdock and Chris Rossi join us this morning to tell us more.

  John Quincy Adams was the last of his kind—a Puritan from the age of the Founders who despised party and compromise, yet dedicated himself to politics and government. The son of John Adams, he was a brilliant ambassador and secretary of state, a frustrated president at a historic turning point in American politics, and a dedicated congressman who literally died in office—at the age of 80, in the House of Representatives, in the midst of an impassioned political debate.

In John Quincy Adams, scholar and journalist James Traub draws on Adams’ diary, letters, and writings to evoke a diplomat and president whose ideas remain with us today.

  The Orlando shooting has particular resonance in our region.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that she knows what Florida is going through because of Sandy Hook. 

Havana
Mark Williamston / Getty Images

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the uncertainties facing Cuba’s young people in 2016, and about a public lecture happening next week in Charlemont, Massachusetts on Cuban immigration and on the recent rapprochement between the U.S. and Cuba.

Peter Purdy of the Charlemont Forum joins us this morning. Also here is Carlos Eire, the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of Religion and History at Yale University and the author of Learning to Die in Miami: Confessions of a Refugee Boy. Carlos will be speaking at The Charlemont Forum in Charlemont, MA, on Wednesday, June 22nd. The speech is entitled: “Migration, Resistance or Reform: Cuba’s Uncertain Future." 

Our region gets to bid farewell to one of popular music’s most beloved albums this weekend, at least on the stage. Brian Wilson and his impeccable band are coming to Tanglewood on Sunday afternoon. The tour is billed as a 50th anniversary celebration — and final concert performance in its entirety — of Pet Sounds. There are two fellow Beach Boys on tour with Wilson, including Blondie Chaplin and longtime collaborator and original member Al Jardine.

6/17/16 Panel

Jun 17, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

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