The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

2/16/18 Panel

Feb 16, 2018

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, and Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti .

A wise, warm, and witty gift for new (and gently used) parents seeking to raise positive, thoughtful children, this alphabet book brims with the advice only those who've been there can give. From "D is for Dog" (get one) to "P is for Praise" (do it often but appropriately) to "R is for Romance" (keep it alive after the kids come), each mini essay is coupled with a smart, letter-appropriate full-color photograph in these delightfully grown-up ABCs.

Deborah Copaken is an author and photojournalist. Her newest book is The ABC's of Parenthood: An Alphabet of Parenting Advice.

Democrats in Massachusetts will have their hands full trying to unseat Gov. Charlie Baker.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, wraps up his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: “Hostiles,” “Paddington 2”

Upcoming:

Time for Three - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Thursday 2/15, 7:30 PM

The Next Women of Country: Sara Evans featuring Raelynn & Kalie Shorr - Palace Theatre, Albany, Thursday 2/15, 8 PM

They Are Waiting for You: Laure Prouvost with Sam Belinfante & Pierre Droulers - EMPAC Theater, Troy, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Bridgman Packer Dance - The Egg, Albany, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Loudon Wainwright III - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Birdland All-Stars featuring Tommy Igoe - Proctors, Schenectady, Friday 2/16, 8 PM

Warren Miller’s Line of Descent - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Mass., Saturday 2/17, 7:30 PM

Eddie Izzard: Believe Me Tour - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Saturday 2/17, 8 PM

Bindlestiff Cirkus Cabin Fever Cabaret (Adult Oriented Show) - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Saturday 2/17, 9 PM

“Looney Tunes”: “Bugs, The Beginning and Beyond” - Capitol Theatre, Rome, Monday 2/19-Saturday 2/24 at 3 PM; Saturday also at 7 PM

New movies: “The Insult,” “Black Panther,” “Early Man”

2/15/18 Panel

Feb 15, 2018

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, Siena College Comparative Politics Professor Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and Editor of The Daily Gazette Judy Patrick.

Marilyn Yalom is a senior scholar at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University, and the author of "A History of the Wife," among other books.

In "The Amorous Heart," Marilyn Yalom tracks the heart metaphor and heart iconography across two thousand years, through Christian theology, pagan love poetry, medieval painting, Shakespearean drama, Enlightenment science, and into the present. She argues that the symbol reveals a tension between love as romantic and sexual on the one hand, and as religious and spiritual on the other.

Daphne de Marneffe, PhD, is a psychologist and the author of "Maternal Desire: On Children, Love, and the Inner Life." In her clinical practice, she offers psychotherapy to couples and individuals. She teaches and lectures widely on marriage, couple therapy, adult development, and parenthood. 

In her new book, "The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together," she explores the pushes and pulls of midlife marriage, where an individual's need to develop can crash headlong into the demands of a relationship.

Democrats are hoping to regain control of Washington this fall.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

After five years of war in Syria, the remaining citizens of Aleppo are getting ready for a siege. Through the eyes of volunteer rescue workers called the White Helmets, "Last Men in Aleppo" allows viewers to experience the daily life, death, and struggle in the streets, where they are fighting for sanity in a city where war has become the norm.

The film is nominated for a 2018 Academy Award for Best Documentary and is currently available to view on Netflix. It will also air on PBS on March 1. Director, Feras Fayyed, joins us.

2/14/18 Panel

Feb 14, 2018

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, and Berkshire Eagle Reporter Jenn Smith.

From an award-winning, “meticulously observant” (The New Yorker) writer, Helen Thorpe, comes a powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

The Newcomers follows the lives of twenty-two immigrant teenagers throughout the course of the 2015-2016 school year as they land at South High School in Denver, Colorado, in an English Language Acquisition class created specifically for them. Speaking no English, unfamiliar with American culture, their stories are poignant and remarkable as they face the enormous challenge of adapting. These newcomers, from fourteen to nineteen years old, come from nations convulsed by drought or famine or war. Many come directly from refugee camps, after experiencing dire forms of cataclysm. Some arrive alone, having left or lost every other member of their original family.

Helen Thorpe is an award-winning journalist who lives in Denver, Colorado. Her journalism has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and 5280.

This week's Book Picks come from Kira Wizner of Merritt Bookstore.

List:

All for Nothing” by Walter Kempowski, translated by Anthea Bell

Freshwater” by Akwaeke Emezi

The Friend, A Novel” by Sigrid Nunez

Eternal Life: A Novel” by Dara Horn

The Great Alone: A Novel” by Kristin Hannah

I Am, I Am, I Am: Seventeen Brushes with Death” by Maggie O'Farrell

Catnip: A Love Story” by Michael Korda

The YES Brain” by Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson

The Big Bed” by Bunmi Laditan, illustrated by Tom Knight

President Trump’s historically low approval ratings have been improving of late.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

"Before They Were Our Mothers: Voices of Women Born Before Rosie Started Riveting" was conceived when Patricia Nugent realized, at her mother’s funeral, that she knew very little about her mother’s life before her mother was her mother. She’d never asked; her mother had never offered. Nugent deeply regretted missing the opportunity to know her mother more fully. To inspire other families to share personal histories, she compiled this anthology of real-life stories about women before they were mothers.

In addition to deeply evocative first-person accounts, "Before They Were Our Mothers" offers readers a personal glimpse of world events from the late 1800s to the mid-1900s, as written in that moment by current-day descendants. We are joined by Patricia Nugent (editor), Sue Van Hook (author) and Crystal Hamelink (author). There will be a reading from the book at Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY on Thursday, February 15 at 7 p.m.

2/13/18 Panel

Feb 13, 2018

         The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain and the Empire Report’s J.P. Miller.

The 5th Annual New York Craft Brewers Festival will take place on Saturday, March 3 at the Desmond Hotel in Albany, New York. The Festival brings together over 60 New York Breweries (and brewers) from every region of the state featuring up to 150+ hard to find and award winning beers.

To tell us more about the festival and craft beer in general we welcome two of the participants: John Fischer from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park and Kevin Mullen from Rare Form Brewing.

Hudson Jazz Festival

Feb 12, 2018

Hudson Hall is presenting the inaugural Hudson Jazz Festival February 16-18 in their upstairs theater.

The HJF is curated by Hudson-based jazz pianist Armen Donelian, and has a real international flair. Jazz matriarch Sheila Jordan and Dominique Eade headline Saturday evening, preceded by the 2018 NEA Jazz Master JoAnne Brackeen earlier in the day. The festival opens with the Middle Eastern sounds of The Ara Dinkjian Quartet, and closes with the fiery, Quarterto Moderno.

The festival also features a free documentary screening and a hands-on jazz workshop. To tell us more, we welcome Armen Donelian and Sheila Jordan.

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

A lot of questions accompany tax season.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, concludes his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

At this moment of rhetoric and fury around the U.S. - Mexico border, writer and former U.S. Border Patrol agent Francisco Cantú has written the new book - "The Line Becomes a River." The book is Cantú’s personal exploration of the border - its politics, gatekeepers, and victims on both sides of the line.

Cantú is the Mexican-American grandson of border-crossers, raised in Arizona by his mother, a park ranger and the daughter of a Mexican immigrant. Haunted by the landscape of his youth, Cantú joined the Border Patrol. He and his partners learned to track other humans under blistering sun and through frigid nights.

Cantú never imagined the number of bodies he would have to collect of people who died trying to cross the desert in the middle of the scorching summer. And he hadn’t expected the relentless teeth-gnashing nightmares that would plague him for years, nightmares so terrifying that they forced him to quit the Patrol.

2/12/18 Panel

Feb 12, 2018

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, communications consultant Theresa Bourgeois, political consultant Libby Post.

Jimmy Webb’s words have been sung to his music by a rich and deep roster of pop artists, including Glen Campbell, Art Garfunkel, Frank Sinatra, Donna Summer and Linda Ronstadt. He’s the only artist ever to win Grammy Awards for music, lyrics, and orchestration, and his chart-topping career has, so far, lasted fifty years, most recently with a Kanye West rap hit and a new classical nocturne.

He joined us to talk about his memoir, "The Cake and The Rain." 

In The Once and Future Liberal, Mark Lilla offers an impassioned, tough-minded, and stinging look at the failure of American liberalism over the past two generations. Although there have been Democrats in the White House, and some notable policy achievements, for nearly 40 years the vision that Ronald Reagan offered—small government, lower taxes, and self-reliant individualism—has remained the country’s dominant political ideology. And the Democratic Party has offered no convincing competing vision in response.

Mark Lilla is a political scientist, journalist and professor of humanities at Columbia University. His newest book is The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics.

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

It may be 2018, but 2016 looms large in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

From the beet fields of North Dakota to the National Forest campgrounds of California to Amazon’s CamperForce program in Texas, employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that social security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road by the tens of thousands in late-model RVs, travel trailers, and vans, forming a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves “workampers.”

On frequently traveled routes between seasonal jobs, Jessica Bruder meets people from all walks of life: a former professor, a McDonald’s vice president, a minister, a college administrator, and a motorcycle cop, among many others―including her irrepressible protagonist, a onetime cocktail waitress, Home Depot clerk, and general contractor named Linda May.

Jessica Bruder is a journalist who reports on subcultures and economic justice. Her newest book is Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century

2/9/18 Panel

Feb 9, 2018

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, corporate attorney Rich Honen, and counter-terrorism expert Malcolm Nance.

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